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el luchador
11-21-2017, 03:46 PM
my personal experience is that humidity in the cook chamber slows down cook time.

This is the same experience that Aaron Franklin has,

but, I have seen the science that says humidity is supposed to speed up cook time?

which is it?

CptKaos
11-21-2017, 05:32 PM
Technically humid air transfers heat better but takes more energy

Larry

angryelfFan
11-21-2017, 05:45 PM
^^^Theoretically agree with the Cpt^^^

pjtexas1
11-21-2017, 06:00 PM
Glad y'all cleared that up???

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CptKaos
11-21-2017, 06:04 PM
Glad y'all cleared that up???

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk

HAHAHAHA. I guess not.
If you can make your fire hot enough to reach the same temp then yes, the humid cook will be faster.

Larry

el luchador
11-21-2017, 09:05 PM
HAHAHAHA. I guess not.
If you can make your fire hot enough to reach the same temp then yes, the humid cook will be faster.

Larry

this page disagrees with that conclusion

http://www.genuineideas.com/ArticlesIndex/humidcooking.html

humidity in the cooking chamber actually increased the amount of time that it took for the "meat" to get to its desired temp

CptKaos
11-21-2017, 09:21 PM
this page disagrees with that conclusion

http://www.genuineideas.com/ArticlesIndex/humidcooking.html

humidity in the cooking chamber actually increased the amount of time that it took for the "meat" to get to its desired temp

Not really, it actually supports my argument, a smoker works more like a convection than regular oven, so if you could imagine the combination of convection and higher humidity the temp stalls higher, shorter and rises more smoothly in a shorter time

Larry

el luchador
11-21-2017, 09:47 PM
Not really, it actually supports my argument, a smoker works more like a convection than regular oven, so if you could imagine the combination of convection and higher humidity the temp stalls higher, shorter and rises more smoothly in a shorter time

Larry

not quite. look at the final chart. convection vs 8% humidity and convection. the 8% rh+conv took longer to get to 200į it

CptKaos
11-21-2017, 10:24 PM
Do you cook all the way to 200 unwrapped? I don't, I like to wrap at about 160 which speeds up last part of the cook.
Their charts and all are pretty but they're cooking a sponge in an electric oven, I'm talking about cooking a brisket in my reverse flow offset. This is all just my opinion, YMMV

Larry

Fillmore Farmer
11-22-2017, 02:17 AM
HAHAHAHA. I guess not.
If you can make your fire hot enough to reach the same temp then yes, the humid cook will be faster.

Agreed...

not quite. look at the final chart. convection vs 8% humidity and convection. the 8% rh+conv took longer to get to 200į it

Not a fair comparison....convection is moving the air around to keep the heat on the meat.

Just like in real life, the more humid areas during summer are harder on us. I'm in L.A. and I'll take 100-degree dry heat over East coast 85-degrees with humidity any day!

The humidity keeps the heat on the meat.....BUT yeah, the water is constantly changing from liquid to gas and so more energy needs to be added to keep the temp up. That's fine, AF says a hot fire makes better smoke so I'd rather keep a hot fire running a moist smoker then a few simmering charcoals sustaining a dry chamber.

guero_gordo
11-22-2017, 02:43 AM
Takes more energy to heat moist air to a given temp than dry air.
For a given temp, moist air contains more energy.

Bill-Chicago
11-22-2017, 07:50 AM
If you do wrap in foil at the tail end of the cook, make sure you wrap the meat shiny side in towards the meat as the more humid air has a harder time adhering to the shiny side.

You want the dull side out to promote equal heat transfer

el luchador
11-22-2017, 09:22 AM
Agreed...



Not a fair comparison....convection is moving the air around to keep the heat on the meat.

.

in ANY comparison, convection or not, the humid chamber cooked slower above 150į

Springram
11-22-2017, 09:28 AM
If you do wrap in foil at the tail end of the cook, make sure you wrap the meat shiny side in towards the meat as the more humid air has a harder time adhering to the shiny side.

You want the dull side out to promote equal heat transfer

I am sorry but my legs do not need pulling. They are long enough. :-P

pjtexas1
11-22-2017, 09:33 AM
If you do wrap in foil at the tail end of the cook, make sure you wrap the meat shiny side in towards the meat as the more humid air has a harder time adhering to the shiny side.

You want the dull side out to promote equal heat transferI double wrap. 1 shiny side out, 1 shiny side in. Best of both worlds. :pound:

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SirPorkaLot
11-22-2017, 09:43 AM
this page disagrees with that conclusion



http://www.genuineideas.com/ArticlesIndex/humidcooking.html



humidity in the cooking chamber actually increased the amount of time that it took for the "meat" to get to its desired temp



Sigh.....

Iím not a thermodynamics scientist, so I canít answer this question scientifically.

What I do know is that the source at your link is the same pseudo-scientist that is behind meatheads many questionable scientific bbq studies.
So the source alone has me questioning any supposed results.

From experience I can tell you that water does in fact act as a heat sink. You will need more fuel to maintain a certain temperature, but that temperature will be more consistent (less spikes in temp).

Consistent temps will help meat cook quicker, but at a cost.

el luchador
11-22-2017, 09:46 AM
Sigh.....

Iím not a thermodynamics scientist, so I canít answer this question scientifically.

What I do know is that the source at your link is the same pseudo-scientist that is behind meatheads many questionable scientific bbq studies.
So the source alone has me questioning any supposed results.

From experience I can tell you that water does in fact act as a heat sink. You will need more fuel to maintain a certain temperature, but that temperature will be more consistent (less spikes in temp).

Consistent temps will help meat cook quicker, but at a cost.

out of curiosity, what questionable studies are you referring to?

thanks.