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Telescopist
06-11-2017, 12:19 PM
Had a fine time smoking 2 butts yesterday. Stall lasted about an hour more then I might have liked but we got through it. I finally figured out that the Food Saver method (vacuum freezing) pork is not the way to go. The vacuum sucks all of the moisture out of the meat. Anyone had the same experience? We need to freeze most of this yield - it's just the two of us. We'll give some away for sure. Looking for suggestions other than vacuum sealing the meat that won't cause freezer burn. Thanks.

sturev
06-11-2017, 12:25 PM
I divide things up in small dishes, throw in the freezer for a couple of hours then pull them out and vac seal them. Works great for sauces also. Just put things in the shape you want so they'll fit in the bags and you're set.

jasonjax
06-11-2017, 12:36 PM
Vacuum sealers works perfectly for me. I set it to "moist" and very little of the juice is pulled out during the vacuum and sealing.

I then reheat the pork in a pot of boiling water in the bag, and tons of juice is still there. I will occasionally add some sauce and or apple juice/apple cider vinegar when reheating.

Cook
06-11-2017, 01:52 PM
Vac bag it only after it's cooled to temp in the fridge. Problem solved.

Reheat in simmering water. Done.

Westx
06-11-2017, 01:58 PM
I vacuum seal all mine after it has set in the fridge overnight so the moisture is setup. Works great for me. Also another trick is to roll up a paper towel and place in the top of the bag to keep the liquid from sucking in to the vacuum chamber.

Q_Done_Right
06-11-2017, 02:04 PM
Vacuum sealers works perfectly for me. I set it to "moist" and very little of the juice is pulled out during the vacuum and sealing.

I then reheat the pork in a pot of boiling water in the bag, and tons of juice is still there. I will occasionally add some sauce and or apple juice/apple cider vinegar when reheating.

This. My vacuum packed pulled pork comes out perfectly every time.

Telescopist
06-11-2017, 02:08 PM
Vacuum sealers works perfectly for me. I set it to "moist" and very little of the juice is pulled out during the vacuum and sealing.

I then reheat the pork in a pot of boiling water in the bag, and tons of juice is still there. I will occasionally add some sauce and or apple juice/apple cider vinegar when reheating.

There is a moist setting on your machine? Whoa. Wait. I'm gonna check mine. I have a Nesco VS-02. Got it off of Amazon. It has 2 vacuum options: 'extended' & 'normal'. I have it set for 'normal'. No "moist" setting.

Sounds like I've gone about this all wrong. I've always taken the meat out of the bag and then heated up. Never thought to try your approach. Boiling in the bag probably has the effect of re-hydrating the meat? It sure seems a bit dry when I open the vacuumed sealed bags.

Telescopist
06-11-2017, 02:09 PM
I vacuum seal all mine after it has set in the fridge overnight so the moisture is setup. Works great for me. Also another trick is to roll up a paper towel and place in the top of the bag to keep the liquid from sucking in to the vacuum chamber.

Cool tip about the paper towel. I am definitely going to try that. Do you moisten the paper towel first?

Westx
06-11-2017, 02:12 PM
No sir. Just roll it up and stick in the bag.

Telescopist
06-11-2017, 02:13 PM
No sir. Just roll it up and stick in the bag.

Gotcha.

dadsr4
06-11-2017, 02:35 PM
I just put it into a ziplock bag, express as much air out as possible, seal, and flatten it out on the counter, and freeze. I then break off the size portion I need, express as much air as possible from the bag, and reseal. Never had a problem with freezer burn or drying out. My theory is that the fat content seals the meat against drying out.

Telescopist
06-11-2017, 02:41 PM
I just put it into a ziplock bag, express as much air out as possible, seal, and flatten it out on the counter, and freeze. I then break off the size portion I need, express as much air as possible from the bag, and reseal. Never had a problem with freezer burn or drying out. My theory is that the fat content seals the meat against drying out.

Good thought about the fat content. I may do a 'test' with this batch. Half in freezer lock zip bags. The other using the insert paper towel/boil in sealed bag method. The I will report back to this group with my extremely important findings. I might be 'known' thereafter as the Myron Mixon of freezing Q.

dadsr4
06-11-2017, 02:46 PM
Good thought about the fat content. I may do a 'test' with this batch. Half in freezer lock zip bags. The other using the insert paper towel/boil in sealed bag method. The I will report back to this group with my extremely important findings. I might be 'known' thereafter as the Myron Mixon of freezing Q.

I bag it by the gallon. Lasts months this way.

Lowki
06-12-2017, 09:08 AM
+1 for cool or freeze first then vacuum seal. Makes re-heating a breeze. Just don't boil your water, if you use cheap bags (like i do) this can melt the bag. Just barely simmer some water, drop it in and let it go for 30-45 mins. perfect every time.

AceQue
06-12-2017, 10:19 AM
I guess I will parrot what most of the other folks said already that I usually let it cool completely before vac sealing, then boil in the bag when I pull some out of the freezer. Never had an issue with moisture doing it this way. If you still find yours a bit dry, add in some apple juice or apple cider vinegar when you reheat it and it should be good to go.

Telescopist
06-12-2017, 11:57 AM
I guess I will parrot what most of the other folks said already that I usually let it cool completely before vac sealing, then boil in the bag when I pull some out of the freezer. Never had an issue with moisture doing it this way. If you still find yours a bit dry, add in some apple juice or apple cider vinegar when you reheat it and it should be good to go.

Thanks for taking the time to respond. Majority rules. Vacuumed up in @ 1# increments. The yield from butts was @ 6#. A lot of fat got rendered out during the crawl up to 195. Smoked with oak. Wish I had some pecan. I'll boil the pkgs. when I take them out of the freezer. Add apple cider vinegar on an as-need basis.

dadsr4
06-12-2017, 12:09 PM
I think it also matters how you choose to use it. I use it on pizzas, in eggs, in place of bacon, as well as in sandwiches. Vacuuming in 1 lbs packages would not work for me. Just another viewpoint. Maybe some of both would be the answer.

sniperfx
06-12-2017, 12:12 PM
Add some sauce and vac seal. It will last a long time in the freezer.

IamMadMan
06-12-2017, 01:37 PM
Had a fine time smoking 2 butts yesterday. Stall lasted about an hour more then I might have liked but we got through it. I finally figured out that the Food Saver method (vacuum freezing) pork is not the way to go. The vacuum sucks all of the moisture out of the meat. Anyone had the same experience? We need to freeze most of this yield - it's just the two of us. We'll give some away for sure. Looking for suggestions other than vacuum sealing the meat that won't cause freezer burn. Thanks.

I think you're doing it the wrong way..........

I vac-seal at least 2 three pound bags a week and have never had any dry pulled pork.

When cooking the pork, I catch the drippings. When the pork is done cooking and holding in the Cambro/Insulated Cooler, I chill the drippings to remove the solidified fat. Once the hold is over and I am ready to pull, I will add the drippings (minus the fat I removed) back to the meat. If I know I am only serving half of the meat, I'll set half of the pulled pork aside as well as half of the drippings and refrigerate them both (separately). You can even pour the warm drippings into your vac-seal bag before refrigerating.

Once the juices have been chilled the proteins will for a gelatinous goo and will prevent air from staying in the lower corners of the bag. I then add the chilled pulled pork and 1/4 cup of apple juice for every pound of pork. Seal the bag, and with most foodsavers a double seal is a great thing to keep the seal intact.

The key is also in reheating the pork...... Bring a pot of water to a full boil, turn off the flame, and then drop the bag of pulled pork into the water. Let stand 15 to 20 minutes to bring to a safe serving temperature. If you boil the bag of pork it will begin to cook, rather overcook, and become dry and unable to hold any moisture in the cell structure of the meat. By setting in the hot water the temperatures will equalize around 160, where as the recomended safe serving temperature for reheated food is 145.


.

Telescopist
06-12-2017, 03:18 PM
I think you're doing it the wrong way..........

I vac-seal at least 2 three pound bags a week and have never had any dry pulled pork.

When cooking the pork, I catch the drippings. When the pork is done cooking and holding in the Cambro/Insulated Cooler, I chill the drippings to remove the solidified fat. Once the hold is over and I am ready to pull, I will add the drippings (minus the fat I removed) back to the meat. If I know I am only serving half of the meat, I'll set half of the pulled pork aside as well as half of the drippings and refrigerate them both (separately). You can even pour the warm drippings into your vac-seal bag before refrigerating.

This sounds like quite a bit of work. I'm not sure that I am up to the task. Maybe if I was smoking 6#'s of meat a week, I'd go about doing this.

Once the juices have been chilled the proteins will for a gelatinous goo and will prevent air from staying in the lower corners of the bag. I then add the chilled pulled pork and 1/4 cup of apple juice for every pound of pork. Seal the bag, and with most foodsavers a double seal is a great thing to keep the seal intact.I like the idea of adding a 1/4 cup of apple juice to each pound. Wouldn't that serve the same purpose of preventing air from staying in the lower corners of the bag during the sealing phase?

The key is also in reheating the pork...... Bring a pot of water to a full boil, turn off the flame, and then drop the bag of pulled pork into the water. Let stand 15 to 20 minutes to bring to a safe serving temperature. If you boil the bag of pork it will begin to cook, rather overcook, and become dry and unable to hold any moisture in the cell structure of the meat. By setting in the hot water the temperatures will equalize around 160, where as the recomended safe serving temperature for reheated food is 145.Good advice. I was planning on simply dumping a bag in the boiling water without a clue about how long to leave it in there. I've copied this. Appreciate your advice.

EdF
06-12-2017, 03:41 PM
Or keep the water temp lower, say around 145-150. This is where I use the SV.

THoey1963
06-12-2017, 05:15 PM
Yes, capture the juices and add back into the pulled pork with a little more rub. I do that whether I am freezing it or serving it right away. Always turns out juicy and flavorful. I pan my butts when they get a nice bark and then wrap in foil. Cook until the bone wiggles. Let them rest until I can handle the hot meat, pull the pork, add rub and fatty juices (I like the pork fat), mix, taste, repeat as needed.

If I am bagging any of the meat, I usually do that after I eat, so it's cool and most of the juices have been absorbed or clinging to the meat.

As far as how to heat the bag, I let it thaw in the fridge over night or in a sink of cold water if it is a last minute decision. I put the cold bag into a pot with cold water. Bring it up to a boil over high heat, remove from heat, cover with a lid, and wait 20 minutes. Cut open the bags and enjoy.

IamMadMan
06-12-2017, 05:31 PM
When cooking the pork, I catch the drippings. When the pork is done cooking and holding in the Cambro/Insulated Cooler, I chill the drippings to remove the solidified fat. Once the hold is over and I am ready to pull, I will add the drippings (minus the fat I removed) back to the meat. If I know I am only serving half of the meat, I'll set half of the pulled pork aside as well as half of the drippings and refrigerate them both (separately). You can even pour the warm drippings into your vac-seal bag before refrigerating.

Once the juices have been chilled the proteins will for a gelatinous goo and will prevent air from staying in the lower corners of the bag. I then add the chilled pulled pork and 1/4 cup of apple juice for every pound of pork. Seal the bag, and with most foodsavers a double seal is a great thing to keep the seal intact..

This sounds like quite a bit of work. I'm not sure that I am up to the task. Maybe if I was smoking 6#'s of meat a week, I'd go about doing this.

I know not everybody cooks in the same manner and it doesn't make any method better or worse than the other.

Don't you collect the drippings to add the flavor back into the meat? It's like the Au Jus for beef....

The holding/rest (above 180) of the pork is to help further breakdown the connective tissue into liquid collagen. While the meat rests, the liquids sits in the refrigerator for 5 minutes to solidify the fat to be removed in one solid chunk.

I like the idea of adding a 1/4 cup of apple juice to each pound. Wouldn't that serve the same purpose of preventing air from staying in the lower corners of the bag during the sealing phase? it will, but the gelatinous proteins are solid in the cold state, so the cold refrigerated pork absorbs the apple juice leaving no liquid to be sucked into the sealer. When reheating the liquids will equalize spreading flavors throughout the pork.

Good advice. I was planning on simply dumping a bag in the boiling water without a clue about how long to leave it in there. I've copied this. Appreciate your advice.

Keep in mind that it is already cooked, you are just gently heating it to serve. You can serve right from the bag.