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ColdFusion71
06-04-2017, 03:57 PM
144450

So I wanted to share my first ever attempt to smoke meat on my 18" Weber kettle. I used the minion method and smoked it for about 7 hours and it got up to 190.

It tasted amazing but I was under the impression that it needed to smoke longer to get that pull apart texture. I had problems keeping the heat down at 250.

I just used generic Kingsford briquettes and some apple wood chips.

I've been reading so much online about the snake method, wood chunks vs wood chips, lump charcoal vs briquettes.

I want to try another shoulder and possibly ribs and brisket in the future. So if any other kettle smokers have experience with such things I would be really grateful for the knowledge you'd pass on.

SmittyJonz
06-04-2017, 03:58 PM
275* is where it's at, most go till bone wiggles like a loose tooth. 198-200-203-205* each butt is different.

SmittyJonz
06-04-2017, 03:59 PM
Eyeball this.......

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=129246
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ShadowDriver
06-04-2017, 04:04 PM
Welcome, brother.

I'd like to offer the suggestion of some firebricks to help create a nice indirect shield from those banked lit briquettes. That's worked well for me in my 22.5, though I have to stagger them a little (that's OK). I've never tried the snake, etc...

Smitty speaks truth on the cook until the bone wiggle. Temps aren't as important as "when it's done, it's done." Pork is very forgiving... if you over cook it, it just gets more tender (fall apart).

Cook where your kettle settles-in... 250-275-300... it's OK.

Thanks for sharing the cook!

ColdFusion71
06-04-2017, 04:09 PM
So what I'm learning is just try different things until you find what works for you.

mcyork28
06-04-2017, 04:15 PM
Is there a particular type of fire brick that should or shouldn't be used in a grill?

UOTE=ShadowDriver;3806934]Welcome, brother.

I'd like to o3ffer the suggestion of some firebricks to help create a nice indirect shield from those banked lit briquettes. That's worked well for me in my 22.5, though I have to stagger them a little (that's OK). I've never tried the snake, etc...

Smitty speaks truth on the cook until the bone wiggle. Temps aren't as important as "when it's done, it's done." Pork is very forgiving... if you over cook it, it just gets more tender (fall apart).

Cook where your kettle settles-in... 250-275-300... it's OK.

Thanks for sharing the cook![/QUOTE]

mtime7
06-04-2017, 04:19 PM
you don't have to have pull apart pork, a lot of people like sliced

dadsr4
06-04-2017, 04:22 PM
So what I'm learning is just try different things until you find what works for you.

That's how I do it. I keep a spiral notebook where I note down what I try. When it works, I copy it into a 3-ring binder for future reference. Your setup, with firebricks to allow more charcoal for the cook, is how I've done it for decades.

ShadowDriver
06-04-2017, 06:01 PM
Is there a particular type of fire brick that should or shouldn't be used in a grill?


Shoot. I just grabbed whatever the local Ace Hardware had (I think it was like a box of 8-10... $25-30? Nothing wrong with a couple extra on-hand).

Do make sure it's no-kidding "firebrick" vs. you just grabbing "brick," as those can possibly explode, and that'd sure mess up a good looking rack of ribs in a hurry.

Here's a link to Ace. (http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId=1366795)

Also, I like to double-up on the bricks in the kettle (that's 2 back-to-back, then same-same on the other side). My kettle's a little larger than yours... you're the expert. I'll be interested to see/hear what you try (heck, even if it's something else entirely), and how it works for you.

pjtexas1
06-04-2017, 06:27 PM
Your local brick supplier has firebrick for less than $2 each. Until then you can take foil folded in an "L" shape to make a heat barrier with coals banked to one side.