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six501
04-28-2017, 09:00 PM
I got a wine fridge from my father that I just need to replace a quick part on and it should be good to go. Unfortunately I am seeing that it the lowest temp might be 45 degrees on it. Is that too high? I think that is too high.

c farmer
04-28-2017, 09:10 PM
You doing real dry curing with cure #2??

I keep my chamber at 50 degrees.

six501
04-28-2017, 09:12 PM
You doing real dry curing with cure #2??

I keep my chamber at 50 degrees.

Was just going to make an attempt at some dry aged rib eyes or ny strip. Pretty much going from this : http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/03/the-food-lab-complete-guide-to-dry-aging-beef-at-home.html

c farmer
04-28-2017, 09:22 PM
Was just going to make an attempt at some dry aged rib eyes or ny strip. Pretty much going from this : http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/03/the-food-lab-complete-guide-to-dry-aging-beef-at-home.html

Cant help with that type of dry curing.

Sorry

Norm
04-28-2017, 10:02 PM
I dry age my whole ribeyes at 34F for 40 days in a college fridge I've added insulation to. Works well for me.

Mrshaunyd
04-28-2017, 10:07 PM
When i ferment for homebrewing i used a fridge plugged into an stc-1000 temp control and a paint bucket heater to hold heat seams like that could work for holding temps in this situation.

Mrshaunyd
04-28-2017, 10:10 PM
You can look up stc 1000 for the build just have to convert from c to f but it sets temps pretty good

SDAR
04-28-2017, 10:11 PM
You can do it at that temp. Just not as long as 30-35.

mtime7
04-28-2017, 10:20 PM
If you are going to dry age beef, you should really buy the proper equipment, that is designed to keep proper temp and humidity. If your not, just wet age the meat

Bbq_lover
04-29-2017, 11:22 PM
I use this with really good results.
https://www.drybagsteak.com

gtr
04-30-2017, 12:04 AM
I've been doing it every Christmas for the past several years - at least 6 or so.

I have a second fridge that doesn't get a lot of traffic. I stick a rib roast in there - I used to do it just on a wooden cutting board, but now do it on a wire rack over a pan. I have a therm in there and make sure it's between 34-38 degrees. I've done 'em from 20 or so days up to around 45 days. I'll just cut off whatever doesn't look like food the night before of the cook and cook it with fantastic results.

six501
04-30-2017, 06:29 AM
You can do it at that temp. Just not as long as 30-35.

Can you elaborate? How long would be good? Debating on hitting up RD next weekend to try it on a whole strip

Wolverine
04-30-2017, 06:56 AM
The UMAI dry bags work great, same here small fridge keep her cool, cut off the crust, and wow what a difference, put a lock on the fridge door so your peeps aint a peeking

EdF
04-30-2017, 09:54 AM
I use this with really good results.
https://www.drybagsteak.com

I'm using that now for the first time on a prime rib roast. About 2-3 weeks in, and it's looking good.

ncmoose
04-30-2017, 10:03 AM
I'm asking here.

My understanding is that there is some trimming involved after dry aging and that, in order for this to not result in too much waste, it is usually done on the carcass, primal or sub primal level.

T or F?

Bbq_lover
04-30-2017, 01:36 PM
I'm asking here.

My understanding is that there is some trimming involved after dry aging and that, in order for this to not result in too much waste, it is usually done on the carcass, primal or sub primal level.

T or F?

There will be some waste. As the meat drys the outer layer turns dry and waxy and I trim it off. I usually do the full sub primal rib eye roast. Waiting 6 weeks for 1 steak isn't worth it to me. Spent the money in the subprimal, dry age, trim, and cut into steaks. Cook however many you want that night, and then vac seal and freeze the rest and you will always have a good dry age steak anytime you want!!

SDAR
04-30-2017, 02:52 PM
Can you elaborate? How long would be good? Debating on hitting up RD next weekend to try it on a whole strip

I'm just saying some really good steak houses dry age at warmer than 35 degrees. They don't dry age for 30 days at higher than that though. You are really just wanting the enzymes to do their work on the meat. Happens faster the hotter you get.

EdF
04-30-2017, 05:33 PM
I'm asking here.

My understanding is that there is some trimming involved after dry aging and that, in order for this to not result in too much waste, it is usually done on the carcass, primal or sub primal level.

T or F?

For people at home, it tends to be at the sub-primal level - like full or half rib roast or loin section. Don't trim too much or you'll be throwing away some of the best part of it.