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View Full Version : (sous vide, pressure cooker) (brisket, pork shoulder) pick one from each and smoke?


airedale
02-01-2017, 02:45 PM
I bought my wife an Instant Pot pressure cooker a couple of years ago (before they were a fad!) and we use it regularly. I bought an Anova Sous Vide cooker about six months ago and we like that too.

Maybe a year ago I did a pork shoulder in the pressure cooker; IIRC it took an hour. Pulled it, added vinegar finishing sauce, and it was quite good though no smoke, of course.

The pressure cooker and the sous vide gadget both offer the opportunity to cook good tender meat without all the hassle of monitoring on a smoker, thermometers, foil, etc.

So it seems logical to try for a hybrid recipe that involves smoking the meat before or after cooking it with one of the electrical gadgets. This can't be a new idea. Have any of you tried this? Tips? Warnings?

Fatback Joe
02-01-2017, 02:51 PM
I have done smoke first and sous vide. Most recently on my face bacon. That was a cold smoke, but you can hot smoke as well.

Bubblehead
02-04-2017, 12:23 PM
I use my sous vide to complete BBQ cooks quite regularly. So much that friends have started calling it "aqua-que". It's takes a few times to figure our how you like the finished product but it's worth the time to figure out.

RolandJT
02-04-2017, 12:31 PM
I've done a cold smoke followed by oven due to time available. Worked well, so I think your idea should too.

Always smoke first as the more cooked your meat the less smoke it will absorb.

airedale
02-04-2017, 12:55 PM
I use my sous vide to complete BBQ cooks quite regularly. So much that friends have started calling it "aqua-que". It's takes a few times to figure our how you like the finished product but it's worth the time to figure out.Glad to hear. Can you give me some details? Type of meat, sous vide before or after smoke? Temp?

I'm especially interested in brisket, where I'd like to sous vide long enough to make it tender without having to take it to 205deg or go through all the probing. Hard to probe a sous vide bag.

Seems like smoking after sous vide would make the most sense. Maybe even be able refrigerate after sous vide if necessary, then warm up in the smoke? Or if its warm/straight from the water bath it seems like the smoke would diffuse into the meat faster -- less time needed.

EdF
02-04-2017, 01:52 PM
I've done butt with a variation of this. Smoked 3 hours at 225-ish, then sv at 176 for 18 hours. Came out great, but not much in the way of bark left. So a few hours smoking after sv might help in that regard.

Kenji recommends 165 for 18-24 hours after smoking to 140 internal temp. Maybe finish with a sear under the broiler or on the grill..

Smoke first reasoning is that it will pick up more smoke flavor than the other way around. The other way around favors the bark condition.

If you're doing SV followed by smoke, ice it before smoking, then pull it when you have the color an bark you're after.

(except for the first suggestion, the others are advice from more experienced guys).

- Ed

WareZdaBeef
02-04-2017, 06:28 PM
If you dont mind having a Instant Pot just for smoked foods then its the best way to go in terms of quick less hassle and good results. But once you go this route, theres no turning back unless you want all your foods to smell smoked.

I like to smoke 1/2 racks of ribs for an hour hot n fast then finish off in the pressure cooker, then slathered in a nice sticky sweet bbq sauce. Fall off the bone in less then two hours total.

EdF
02-04-2017, 06:49 PM
Yeah, a pressure cooker is a mighty fine tool to have around. Try your rice in it if you haven't. Brown the rice in butter in it (until translucent), then 1-1/2 water to 1 rice by volume and an appropriate amount of salt. Pressure on high for 3 minutes. Shut it down and let it sit for 7. Release the pressure and enjoy. I haven't found a better way.

airedale
02-04-2017, 07:19 PM
... once you go this route, theres no turning back unless you want all your foods to smell smoked. ... The thick silicone lid seal is known to pick up flavors. Some people have two or more seals, like one for fish and one for dead mammal. We have not tried this.

When you say that the smoke flavor stays, are you using a different seal ring for smoked foods? It doesn't seem like the stainless would hold flavors but there are a few nooks and crannies in the lid. Do you think that's a factor?

Actually what I am thinking about trying is to smoke a shoulder or part of a shoulder for a few hours, then to pressure cook it for maybe an hour. We did pressure cook an unsmoked piece of shoulder for 45 minutes and it was quite good and did pull ok, but wasn't totally falling apart. If I do try this, I guess I'll have to buy a second lid seal or maybe even two.