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View Full Version : Anyone cooked a whole steamship round on the smoker?


jasonjax
01-02-2017, 01:04 PM
I'm thinking about doing one of these for a large party.

I'll have plenty of room on the FEC-100 for it if I move some shelves around.

Any tips or thoughts about cooking something that big on the smoker? Makes a brisket look like child's play!

Thanks.

daninnewjersey
01-02-2017, 01:06 PM
What is a steamship round?

sturev
01-02-2017, 01:22 PM
:shock:

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-I6NchxhvzxA/U2PHUgdnhSI/AAAAAAAA2qQ/mW2yNQK9sU0/s1600/DSC_0066.JPG

daninnewjersey
01-02-2017, 01:27 PM
Holy sh*t.....:shock::shock:

Actually I just looked up on Google. Man....I thought a whole chuck roll was big....WOW. Strangely....I'm feeling an uncontrollable urge to text my butcher and see if he can get one...:mrgreen::mrgreen:

Will be VERY interested in following this thread....

McSpazatron
01-02-2017, 01:28 PM
Is that an entire cow's hind quarter? I call that lazy butchering :)

HunkyDory
01-02-2017, 01:47 PM
First you need a cooker the size of a coal fired furnace, like a steamship would have. Then you need a cow, then a wheelbarrow each of salt and pepper. A meat thermometer with about a 10 inch probe would be helpful. Since it is a "round" cut I would aim for rare on the inside or that thing might be tougher than heck. Not much connective tissue to render in a hind quarter.

I've done a few mutton legs on a Santa Maria grill in my time but this is something else. I will stay tuned for the play by play.

dadsr4
01-02-2017, 03:11 PM
Posts from here.
https://www.google.com/search?q=steamship+round+site%3Ahttp%3A%2F%2Fwww.b bq-brethren.com&oq=steamship+round+site%3Ahttp%3A%2F%2Fwww.bbq-brethren.com&gs_l=serp.12...12977.20873.0.22189.7.7.0.0.0.0.147 .974.0j7.7.0....0...1c.1j2.64.serp..0.6.855...0j0i 22i30k1j33i160k1j33i21k1.xm5BDOuMrGw

jasonjax
01-02-2017, 03:45 PM
Posts from here.
https://www.google.com/search?q=steamship+round+site%3Ahttp%3A%2F%2Fwww.b bq-brethren.com&oq=steamship+round+site%3Ahttp%3A%2F%2Fwww.bbq-brethren.com&gs_l=serp.12...12977.20873.0.22189.7.7.0.0.0.0.147 .974.0j7.7.0....0...1c.1j2.64.serp..0.6.855...0j0i 22i30k1j33i160k1j33i21k1.xm5BDOuMrGw

I actually started one of those threads. I'm ready for a fresh take with new blood. I did the clod, but I still haven't tried a steamship round, and I want to!

I found some great advice in some of those threads, but a lot of it discussed rotisserie.

I'd be throwing this in a FEC-100 and cooking @ around 350* .... 400 would be getting close to the thermal limit of the FEC-100.

And if you're a beef fan like me check out this video. Very cool. Chef Schneller Breaks Down a Beef Round - YouTube

RolandJT
01-02-2017, 04:10 PM
I seem to recall that these are normally cooked to med rare and served in sort of thin roast beef slices--the slices are huge so I have seen them divided into a rare/med rare half from the part near the center and the big bone and a med half from the part nearer the outside.

Imagine that that thing will take a while to cook at 275!!

pcshrews
01-02-2017, 04:29 PM
Thks for posting and not quite sure what to say about this other than....bring it on!!! I would love to see the cook if you end up doing this. Good luck and I'm subscribed in!:-D

Big George's BBQ
01-02-2017, 04:36 PM
If you do it I will definitely be interested in following it

thunderalley3
01-02-2017, 04:47 PM
I have done a few in an Alto Sham cook and hold cabinet. I did mine standing straight up, it has been awhile and I do not remember the temperature sequence, I followed the Alto Sham instructions for time and temp, but I do remember putting it in right after lunch service, which would have been about 2 so it would be ready for the next day lunch which started at 11:30, and it had about an hours rest before carving so it came out about 10:30, med rare only, anymore than that and it becomes very tough.

I do remember using a boning knife and making straight in cuts at different depths and pushing whole peeled garlic cloves in the cuts, they were usually about 60 pound steamships and I would put about 16-20 garlic cloves in and then just a sea salt and pepper rub on it.

They are delicious, I always liked doing the carving and you really could see the structure of the meat. I was always amazed that the garlic would stay whole and when you would carve just a little flick of the knife and they would fall to the carving board. Many liked to have a clove or two to add to their meat.

I always trimmed the rest when lunch service was over and would make vegetable beef soup the next day. The bones are amazing, I have English Mastiff's and they always got the bone.

pitbossJB
01-02-2017, 04:55 PM
WOW!!! That's as big as my smoker!

mjpmap
01-02-2017, 05:02 PM
I haven't heard anyone talk about a steamship round in decades. I admire you for taking it on. It's definitely meant for a LARGE group of healthy eaters. As I recall, you typically offer a choice of au jus or horseradish sauce to accompany. I also recall that the quarter was hung in a cooler for an extended time before the round was taken. Between the fat cap on the outside, and the bone on the inside, it should be great!!!

LYU370
01-02-2017, 05:04 PM
I can ask a friend of mine. He orders & cooks a corned Steamship round every year at his bar for St. Patrick's day. Always comes out fantastic. I go there every year just for the corned beef.

qapla
01-02-2017, 06:45 PM
I can't offer any advise on how you should cook that monster .... but -, when you decide to cook that thing, keep in mind ... I live just down the road (near Starke) and work in Jax regularly.

gtsum
01-02-2017, 07:04 PM
In for the details


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

LYU370
01-02-2017, 07:21 PM
From my friend who cooks a corned one every year at his bar for St. Pats:

"First put your rub on it, let it sit out at room temp, at least 2 hrs, I roast it at 300 for approximately 14 hrs that should give you a nice medium rare. Good luck, you must have a big smoker!! Anything else let me know.

The steamships I roast are at least 80lbs"

gcs
01-03-2017, 01:32 PM
Never saw a bone in roast like that, would be great at a Viking feast! closest thing around "here" would be a whole top round that's cut thin at a buffet, med, med rare.

jasonjax
01-03-2017, 04:08 PM
I can't offer any advise on how you should cook that monster .... but -, when you decide to cook that thing, keep in mind ... I live just down the road (near Starke) and work in Jax regularly.

Haha ...will do.

I'm still searching for the right party to do this. I have a couple in mind though.

thanks for all the advice folks!

Demosthenes9
01-06-2017, 09:39 PM
Stemship is indeed the entire hind quarter and consists of the top(inside) round, bottom round, eye of round and the sirloin tip. I'd cook it @ 225 or even lower to get a nice consistent edge to edge temp gradient/color and to make it more tender. If your heat source is truly indirect, the height or width of the Round won't matter, rather, the thickness (shortest dimension) of the round will determine how long it will take to cook.

I'd take it to mid rare preferably and medium at most. Have a hot pan of au jus at the ready for those who want their meat to be mid well.