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View Full Version : Another XMas Prime Rib Question


Bigjohnb20
12-20-2016, 03:06 PM
So, I know there are numerous prime rib threads already, but I have specific question I have not seen addressed.

I am doing a prime rib for the fam for Christmas, that much is certain. I am struggling with how I want to cook it. I have available: an oven, a 22in kettle, rotisserie attachment for said kettle, and an Anova sous vide.

Last year I did a reverse sear of sorts on the kettle with some wood during the slow part. Turned out good, but not great. Decided I don't like a lot of smoke for prime rib. This year I had all but decided it was rotisserie time, likely using lump/kingsford comp without additional wood.

However, looking around I have seen a few of the rotisserie roasts and while the exterior crust looks fantastic, it seems most end up with quite the "bullseye" effect. IE well done outside with a temp gradient into the med rare center. So as I see it my options are:
Oven/Sous Vide reverse sear - Perfect edge to edge, lacking crust and any grilled flavor
Kettle reverse sear - Perfect edge to edge (if I can keep temp low at first), decent crust and grill flavor
Rotisserie - Potential "gradient" doneness, best crust and grilled flavor. Also get to use my newish toy:wink:
Wildcard - Remove deckle, rotisserie the "eye" roast and then Sous vide/sear the deckle separately. Best of both worlds? but more work/complication.

Ok, so after all that not sure I even proposed a question....:blah: but I guess looking for opinions on what route YOU would go and WHY. Thanks,

MrStik
12-20-2016, 03:13 PM
I vote for Kettle Reverse Sear.

wormy
12-20-2016, 03:19 PM
Check out this document. This is the way I cooked it for Thanksgiving and it was a HOMERUN!!!!!!

If I'm not mistaken I got this recipe from an old post by one of the Brethren

Gore
12-20-2016, 03:25 PM
Your bullseye effect should not be the result of using a rotisserie. Its cause has more to do with cooking at higher temperature. If you cook (or reverse sear) around 220*, you should achieve a more even cook, pink all the way through if you like. If you raise the temperature you'll create a greater temperature gradient and have a more well-done outside.

For the record, there is no right or wrong way, only a matter of preference. I like these just as well cooked at higher temperature.

daninnewjersey
12-20-2016, 03:44 PM
The least complicated might be the kettle if you can keep the temps from running away. You'll get a killer roast, nice crust, and you can sear it, too...

Jrogers84
12-20-2016, 04:18 PM
Why not go kettle with less smoke? If that was your only issue before that is easily fixed. I usually use one hunk of oak or similar for smoke to give it a light flavor.

Bigjohnb20
12-20-2016, 05:04 PM
Yeah thanks for the responses guys.

I guess the bigger issue is that I kinda WANT to use the rotisserie if nothing more than for the novelty. I just got it this summer and havent been able to use it as much as I liked. Basically only done a couple chickens. Maybe the real question is has anyone done a rotisserie prime rib at the lower temps? Do you still achieve what I would anticipate to be the superior crust without the higher temps. On the kettle it is a little more difficult to do a lower temp roti than say on a gasser roti, but I know it can be done.

Honestly, I don't think I would mind a small gradient in the doneness. I think my issue is that all the images I get back for rotisserie prime rib on a goodle search show the deckle muscle, basically the best part of the roast, is pretty well done. Hence my wildcard option in the OP. But then I just start to think its a lot of effort and I will likely have a lot going on.

For the record, I have read all threads (well most I'd guess) here on prime rib. I am very familiar with the "traditional" ways to cook them and what effects different temps/etc. will have on the final product. I just don't see a lot of people talking about doing them on the rotisserie

smoke ninja
12-20-2016, 05:32 PM
I like the results a low temp cook gives prime rib. That use to mean the oven but this year im going sous vide.

Here's a good thread.

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=150482

If you do decide to go with the roto please post your results there