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View Full Version : First brisket. Got a couple questions and or issues (amateur pron)


Silenoz
09-25-2016, 02:49 PM
I had big hopes for my first brisket... probably the same as many before me. Few bumps along the way.

Bought brisket at CostCo on Wednesday. (First time ever seeing it there) the goal was to smoke my first brisket for a party this weekend.

I don't know how to insert pics so you might get a group of em and and have to use your imagination for the time line. Started last night prepping around 6pm. Unfortunately the fridge frozen the largest portion of it :doh: I had to get creative cause I am very short on time for the next few days so I hacked off the frozen portion and would figure that out later. Darn. Set backs already.

Coated the brisket with salt first. Then cracked pepper and garlic powder followed by a light dusting of some steak seasoning.

The extra piece made me sick just looking at it so I went nuts on it and did something totally unconventional. (Tried following everything by the book and basic for the larger slab) so I covered it heavily in salt. Then I made a paste out of oregano, black pepper, balsamic vinegar and Thai garlic chili paste. Coated this whole piece and threw it in above the bigger portion of brisket.

Cooked at 250 from 730pm until 1130pm and then dropped it to the low 200s til I woke up. Using a masterbuilt electric smoker. Used the trick to preload the hopper with charcoal underneath a bed of chips. Loaded more chips every hour before bed and 2 more pieces of charcoal total.

Woke up and it was 172. Uh oh. Stabbed them with the probe and it went in like butter in both pieces. Temp is really low for it to feel done... good bark... what to do? I covered them in foIL and added a little bit of liquid. Brought the temp back up to 250 to finish

An hour later I check them and the larger piece feels like it's getting tougher. I pull them out and wrap them up inntowels and in the cooler they go. The smaller chunk is perfect. The color and bark look good. The larger one seems to have gone backwards and the bark became loose and wet. Holy carp. I have some more pics. I need to figure out the best place to remove the point on the larger piece that got butchered and hopefully figure out how I ruined my bark.

Apologies in advance. I had issues uploading pics and I know this post is all over the place. Thank you all for any feedback. Hope your weekend is going great!

pjtexas1
09-25-2016, 03:10 PM
Liquid in foil is s good way to moisten bark.

Silenoz
09-25-2016, 03:14 PM
Learning that the hard way. Didn't use a lot. I thought it was necessary but instead will only do it if I think. We are getting over done. Thank you for your input brother.

Silenoz
09-25-2016, 03:34 PM
The smaller piece was the tastiest of the group. Wow. Didn't taste like anything you'd expect from brisket but I am impressed. The bark firmed up on its own somehow from the larger slab.

pjtexas1
09-25-2016, 03:41 PM
Learning that the hard way. Didn't use a lot. I thought it was necessary but instead will only do it if I think. We are getting over done. Thank you for your input brother.

Foil can work but the bark has to be set really good and you need to let it vent before resting/holding. Venting helps firm the bark back up after the foil steams the bark. Some don't care about bark and add liquid.

landarc
09-25-2016, 03:42 PM
The smaller piece was the point, which explains it being soft and done. The smaller size and the fact that it was the point meant it cooked faster.

The flat was likely not done. You didn't give an actual length of time it was at 200F, it is possible that you actually cooked it in a manner similar to sous vide, which would both explain it being done at 175F internal, it going slightly backward when removed from heat, and it being soggy. Although, my guess is that is was actually not even close to being done, and that is why it got tougher over time.

I have only had a brisket go backward a couple of times, and it was when I unwrapped a brisket that was not quite done, and left it on the pit. It actually drops a few degrees and has to restart, due to the loss of steams effect once unwrapped.

Silenoz
09-25-2016, 04:19 PM
The flat was likely not done. You didn't give an actual length of time it was at 200F, it is possible that you actually cooked it in a manner similar to sous vide, which would both explain it being done at 175F internal, it going slightly backward when removed from heat, and it being soggy. Although, my guess is that is was actually not even close to being done, and that is why it got tougher over time.


For approximately 10 hours. Im Gonna have to Google sous vide.

So next time i foil it I need to make sure it had a vent?

On the bright side it was all delicious and tender.

pjtexas1
09-25-2016, 04:29 PM
Venting is letting the brisket cool down, while uncovered a few degrees after it comes of the cooker to stop the cooking process. When wrapped in foil it also helps the bark firm back up after steaming in foil. Without venting it will continue to cook and possibly overcook.

landarc
09-25-2016, 04:41 PM
Cooking in foil will always result in a softer bark. That's just because it allows for a buildup of steam. Some folks prefer a tender bark.

Silenoz
09-25-2016, 04:47 PM
Seems like it wasn't even necessary to foil for the last hour then. I'm sure all my experiences will be different going forward when I don't prebutcher my meat.

Thanks again for all of you helping me with this fun learning process!

medic92
09-25-2016, 04:47 PM
The only real piece of advice I can give you is one my mother gave me that applies to any kind of cooking...

Never, EVER, try something new when you're cooking for guests. And if you're going to break that rule, have a backup plan ready.

Silenoz
09-25-2016, 04:49 PM
The only real piece of advice I can give you is one my mother gave me that applies to any kind of cooking...

Never, EVER, try something new when you're cooking for guests. And if you're going to break that rule, have a backup plan ready.

But that would be using common sense!