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waywardtravel
09-11-2016, 05:14 PM
Can someone point me in the right direction for a good quality ring burner for future commercial use. There is so many and to be honest I have no idea what pressure and size of unit to purchase.

This will be for large pots of beans/ heating water etc and mounted on a smoker trailer.

I often read BTU output varies with pressure used. I assume that can only be true to a point. I've seen some that have 3 separate rings within, each being on it's own valve. Looks like a good idea but how different is that from restricting the flow?

SGH
09-11-2016, 07:18 PM
I have used this ring burner for about 20 years. Never had one problem with it. Not sure of what capacity you will be using it in, but it's large enough to hold up to commercial use and demand. I have the 4 ring, not the 3 ring. Also mine is propane, not natural gas. With that said, I'm sure the 3 ring is of equal quality.

http://www.cajunshoppe.com/lgcast.htm

Titch
09-11-2016, 07:19 PM
I have used this ring burner for about 20 years. Never had one problem with it. Not sure of what capacity you will be using it in, but it's large enough to hold up to commercial use and demand. I have the 4 ring, not the 3 ring. Also mine is propane, not natural gas. With that said, I'm sure the 3 ring is of equal quality.

http://www.cajunshoppe.com/lgcast.htm


Do they blow out in wind?

SGH
09-11-2016, 07:22 PM
Do they blow out in wind?

Yes sir, they will. This is the down side of a "low pressure" burner as opposed to a high pressure burner. I use the ring burner either inside of the shop or surround it with sheets of tin.

SGH
09-11-2016, 07:54 PM
I've seen some that have 3 separate rings within, each being on it's own valve. Looks like a good idea but how different is that from restricting the flow?

It is very different. Each ring is fed by a independent valve with a dedicated air shudder. You can shut down the outside ring if using a pot that will not cover all rings. If you simply restricted flow as you asked above, you would have an entire ring burning on the outside of the pot. That is one advantage to using a ring burner. You have independent control of all rings. You can shut down the rings that are not needed or you can run the rings at different flame heights to suit your particular cooking need.

waywardtravel
09-11-2016, 10:42 PM
The wind comment is a good point I've yet to experience on a burner.

It does get windy here. Usually right before a tropical sideways rain.

Is there downfalls to higher pressure if that's better in the wind?
I would assume its near the same consumption per btu so to speak.

I can't say what my capacity needs to be but i am usually a bigger is better person.
I have never had or used an outdoor burner of any kind yet so I'm totally green.

I'm assuming I'll have 2 burners. One around 12" similar to a crab cooker type on that site and one in between that and a household as far as BTU. I really don't know the household BTU's and I know they vary some.

SGH
09-11-2016, 11:16 PM
Is there downfalls to higher pressure if that's better in the wind?
I would assume its near the same consumption per btu so to speak.


There is pros and cons for both. Here are a few of them.
High pressure pros:
Extremely powerful.
Will not blow out except in extreme cases.
Replacement parts readily available everywhere.
Easier to adjust on the fly than a low pressure burner.
Less finicky about regulator size.

High pressure cons:
Much louder than a low pressure burner. This may seem insignificant until you have to listen to the roar of a high pressure burner indoors for 8 hours. It becomes quite annoying.
Uses more fuel (in most cases but not all).
You have less flame control with a high pressure. Each bump of the regulator on a high pressure burner is a pretty big move compared to the same bump a low pressure burner.

Low pressure pros:
Quite.
Fuel efficient.
Great flame control. Can be fine tuned.

Low pressure cons:
Not nearly as powerful as a big high pressure cast.
Easier to blow out in the wind than a high pressure.
They are a little more finicky and harder to adjust to a neutral flame than a high pressure cast.

The above is just a quick general comparison. What it will actually come down to is the intended use of the burner. If your forte is boiling real large amounts at a time, then it's simply no comparison, go with a large high pressure. If your forte is cooking large gumbos etc, etc, where you need precision control, you will be much better served by a low pressure ring burner.
To be clear, the low pressure burners blowing out is not that big of a problem. Simply use a makeshift wind break or use them in a protected area. I actually recommend (if money permits) to get a high and low pressure burner. Use the high pressure for all of your big boils where a lot of heat is required and use your low pressure for general cooking. I hope this helps my friend.

SGH
09-11-2016, 11:26 PM
Brother wayward, after re-reading your post above, I see that you are mounting it on a trailer. With that said, I would go with a high pressure. I have high pressures on my Shirley. Out in the elements (like a smoker usually is) the high pressure will serve you better in the long run. Sorry for not catching that sooner. If you were going to be using it mostly in a protected environment, the low pressure ring burner would be hard to beat.

waywardtravel
09-12-2016, 03:37 PM
Thank you, I guess I should have 2.
I'll do some more researching on models from amazon since some are respected through some other q sites.

Then to find the right adjustable pressure regulator but that should be easy. Everything I'm reading is 6-40psi max.