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Swine Spectator
09-07-2016, 11:27 PM
The purpose of this thread is to throw out new ideas. What can you come up with to make better Q? These ideas do not have to be tested or proven. I was reading my APL books and he keeps talking about how chef's always look for ways to add flavors (e.g.: flavored salts, herb basting brushes).

I'll go first:

We spend a lot of time talking about rubs and sauces, but I don't see as much effort put into spritz's and sprays. Some people do it, others don't. The ones who do usually use water, apple juice, cider vinegar, or a combination thereof.

My idea is to jazz up the contents of the spray bottle. What about sweetened iced tea with lemon? (It's got sugar, acid, and umami.) Or maybe apple juice, soy sauce, and molasses to lacquer the meat in the last hour of cooking.

Thoughts?

Other ideas?

Ham14
09-07-2016, 11:32 PM
I think getting that good injection makes a great BBQ. Your right a good mop can really keep that moisture and flavor. This should get a lot of responses. Looking forward to seeing what others have

Fwismoker
09-07-2016, 11:34 PM
From a cooker stand point or just prep or technique stand point?

Ham14
09-07-2016, 11:34 PM
I did like the episode of smoked were that guy used pickle juice on brisket.

ShadowDriver
09-08-2016, 12:31 AM
I've enjoyed reading about the interesting Indian Curry twists that Jason TQ has been using on brisket in the past few months.

Indian, Thai, and Korean flavors work so well with the same meats we cook on a regular basis... but they don't often enter into the "BBQ" discussion.

Buccs' Thai-Inspired Pork Riblets (and my Babyback version of those) has been a HUGE hit every time I've cooked 'em with different crowds.

Interesting discussion...

I'm also interested cooking technique, TBH. Heck, having spun ribs and cooked bird on a 007 with Fwismoker... there's always room for interesting / new / (old?) ideas that "just work."

jwtseng
09-08-2016, 01:39 AM
I think most of us have a good idea of what BBQ should look and taste like, and that's probably what we are fixated on when we get down to act of prepping and cooking. And I know that when I throw strange ingredients into a cook or move the bones around or start meat-gluing different parts to other parts, I start getting strange looks or the BBQ purists inevitably scoff at it.

But I think you've hit the nail on the head when you break down the BBQ flavor into its basic flavor components (salty, sweet, sour, umami...no one really likes bitter) and start to experiment with different ingredients that can contribute the same components. There's a current thread on here about satay burgers flavored with what some would consider an excessive amount of asian fish sauce. And I'll hazard a guess that most non-Asian people would find fish sauce in and of itself rather revolting from a flavor standpoint as well as the simple fact that it is made from fermented/rotting fish. But if you think about it, fish sauce lends the flavors of salt, sweet, sour, and umami in spades! And indeed, those satay burgers full of fish sauce turned out to be delicious, and if any of us tasted them we would probably all agree on its unique deliciousness and yet not be able to put our finger on the exact revolting ingredient that made it so.

So whether you brine it or inject it or spritz it, heck ya...definitely try to mix it up again and again. BBQ is tasty no matter how you look at it. But trying new twists like you aspire to...that's what keeps BBQ fun and interesting.

jwtseng
09-08-2016, 01:55 AM
As far as technique goes, this is my current fascination...

http://i.imgur.com/S5q4to4l.jpg

I've been trying different things to make grilled ribs cook faster and be more flavorful and more tender. Pork spare ribs. The premise, I guess, is that the rib tip end of the rack needs more time/exposure to heat to fully render and tenderize than the bone end, and if I cut the ribs completely apart the bone end would dry up before the other end was yummy enough. Side benefit of cutting them this way is that I can get the rub/mop/spritz and char on all sides of each individual rib.

Anyways, it's a hairbrained idea from someone who loves playing with their food. But it *is* fun and it allows me to do stuff like this LOL:

http://i.imgur.com/msbMWFCl.jpg

iapepper
09-08-2016, 03:17 AM
I know a guy that uses pomegranate juice as a spritzer, but to be honest, i couldn't taste it in his meat.

Durangutan
09-08-2016, 08:45 AM
1:1 apple juice & bourbon. Don't know how it affects flavor but it's wet, sounds cool when asked what's in the bottle and I give myself a spritz from time to time as well!

THoey1963
09-08-2016, 09:47 AM
I am always interested in learning new BBQ ideas, but I will also stay I am *still* trying to consistently produce good traditional BBQ, so I am a little leery of trying anything too out of the box...

Swine Spectator
09-08-2016, 11:06 AM
From a cooker stand point or just prep or technique stand point?

Anything. I read lots of cookbooks. When I read Adam Perry Lang's books or Tom Colicchio's "Think Like a Chef", they constant talk about little things they do to add extra flavor. I used to know an Italian Chef who never put salt in seafood dishes. He would add anchovies instead. You never saw or noticed them in the finished dish, because they fell apart during cooking. However, they added that salty briny flavor. You would never be able to pinpoint the anchovy, but it added a little something.

I am trying to train myself to think this way and am hoping others will join me in this thread.

David

TedW
09-08-2016, 11:12 AM
For sauces, I went to the extent to make my own Apple Butter and Apple Cider Vinegar from local apples, picked at their peak. I also get to blend bitter, tart and sweet apples for a more complex flavor for both the vinegar and the butter.

Right on Q
09-08-2016, 11:25 AM
I once heard someone say he experimented with cooking brisket in a cast iron pan to increase the maillard reaction on the bark. I think he ended up abandoning the idea.

Heard of folks reinjecting pork or brisket drippings back into the meat after it's been cooked to give it an extra punch of flavor and moisture.

As far as rubs and sauces go I agree about Asian flavors. A vast majority of people I see use SPOG + Chili powder, paprika etc etc in different ratios. I've been thinking of using different ingredients lately after rewatching some Good Eats episodes and seeing the flavors he works with on the show.

dadsr4
09-08-2016, 12:14 PM
I think I learned the most when I tried cooking meat naked and learned how to accent the natural flavors. I've found that there are a lot of people who have never tasted ribs without sauce, sugar, and heavy spices.

1buckie
09-08-2016, 12:14 PM
One of my favorite ribs is Ethiopian "berbere" spice.....really good & not like anything else.....

http://i1223.photobucket.com/albums/dd520/1buckie/clodribszukes035.jpg

(cooked dry only, just resting on foil from other ribs)

Ethiopian & Moroccan spice combinations are REAL interesting....

Another one is to foil first & ask questions later....Sometimes I foil & bake first, then set them out to firm up....

http://i1223.photobucket.com/albums/dd520/1buckie/Stupor%20Bowl%20%202012/StuporBowl2012020.jpg

http://i1223.photobucket.com/albums/dd520/1buckie/Stupor%20Bowl%20%202012/StuporBowl2012037.jpg

Save whatever sauces collect and are added to glaze over....

http://i1223.photobucket.com/albums/dd520/1buckie/Stupor%20Bowl%20%202012/StuporBowl2012032.jpg

Blueberry / chipotle backribs.....

http://i1223.photobucket.com/albums/dd520/1buckie/Stupor%20Bowl%20%202012/StuporBowl2012042.jpg

http://i1223.photobucket.com/albums/dd520/1buckie/Stupor%20Bowl%20%202012/StuporBowl2012040.jpg

(Not smoked & hence, maybe not real live BBQ, but real good)

Last one (& I know this makes some folks cringe) but running tri-tip all nite to pull....very low heat, heavily injected....

http://i1223.photobucket.com/albums/dd520/1buckie/Memorials%20July%202012/MemorialsJuly2012031-1.jpg

Result is beef flavored butter....

http://i1223.photobucket.com/albums/dd520/1buckie/Memorials%20July%202012/MemorialsJuly2012043-1.jpg

dadsr4
09-08-2016, 12:28 PM
I had to look Ethiopian "berbere" spice up. It sounds good.

1/2 teaspoon fenugreek
1/2 cup ground dried New Mexico chiles
1/4 cup paprika
1 tablespoon salt
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
Further Googling reveled that yellow mustard seeds when used in small quantities can substitute for fenugreek

Groundhog66
09-08-2016, 12:30 PM
As far as technique goes, this is my current fascination...

http://i.imgur.com/S5q4to4l.jpg

I've been trying different things to make grilled ribs cook faster and be more flavorful and more tender. Pork spare ribs. The premise, I guess, is that the rib tip end of the rack needs more time/exposure to heat to fully render and tenderize than the bone end, and if I cut the ribs completely apart the bone end would dry up before the other end was yummy enough. Side benefit of cutting them this way is that I can get the rub/mop/spritz and char on all sides of each individual rib.

Anyways, it's a hairbrained idea from someone who loves playing with their food. But it *is* fun and it allows me to do stuff like this LOL:



That's a really cool concept.

dadsr4
09-08-2016, 12:32 PM
That's a really cool concept.
Someone here posted this.
http://i1193.photobucket.com/albums/aa345/dadsr4/BBQ/Bearpawribs_zps22a273c3.jpg

Jason TQ
09-08-2016, 12:36 PM
As far as technique goes, this is my current fascination...

http://i.imgur.com/S5q4to4l.jpg

I've been trying different things to make grilled ribs cook faster and be more flavorful and more tender. Pork spare ribs. The premise, I guess, is that the rib tip end of the rack needs more time/exposure to heat to fully render and tenderize than the bone end, and if I cut the ribs completely apart the bone end would dry up before the other end was yummy enough. Side benefit of cutting them this way is that I can get the rub/mop/spritz and char on all sides of each individual rib.

Anyways, it's a hairbrained idea from someone who loves playing with their food. But it *is* fun and it allows me to do stuff like this LOL:

http://i.imgur.com/msbMWFCl.jpg

I dig this. Almost like smoking the bones individually, but that little bit of connection makes it look awesome!

1buckie
09-08-2016, 12:46 PM
I had to look Ethiopian "berbere" spice up. It sounds good.

1/2 teaspoon fenugreek
1/2 cup ground dried New Mexico chiles
1/4 cup paprika
1 tablespoon salt
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
Further Googling reveled that yellow mustard seeds when used in small quantities can substitute for fenugreek

Fenugreek sounds weird, but not as hard to find as it may seem......"earthy" (overused term) but that's how I would describe it....I have a bottle to use for mixing, also pre-mixed berbere.....

These folks have a bunch of different stuff:

http://www.sadaf.com/herbs/?page=1

and:

https://www.spicejungle.com/berbere-ethiopian-spice-bend?gclid=CjwKEAjwmMS-BRCm5dn51JLbp1wSJACc61tF456IQ7zgktb_pv9fL-SmOawd7ZeHNMaCiI15OLWDrhoCJWnw_wcB

ajowan or ajawan, is another element that makes it jump....

krex1010
09-08-2016, 03:11 PM
The first thing that came to mind when reading this thread is maybe the most important lesson I've learned when it comes to cooking......write stuff down! I don't know how many times over the years I've tried stuff, loved it, then had trouble repeating it because I didn't write down what I did....I forget whole recipes and dishes for years because I didn't write it down.....I learned though, I keep notes in a recipe box and its makes things so much easier to repeat and tweek. I know it's not just a BBQ tip, but it's definitely worth while in my opinion.

landarc
09-08-2016, 03:26 PM
Because I come from a culinary, and Asian, background, the use of many different spices comes naturally to me. I do tend to cook simple flavors with BBQ, just as that is my preference.

I also still use my Pig Honey mop when cooking ribs and chicken, which does include fish sauce and sometimes soy sauce or Japanese Worcestershire sauce.

mjpmap
09-08-2016, 03:41 PM
My thing is to look at full meals that aren't thought of for Q, and then finding a way to fix that meal over coals or wood. Grilled lettuces, lasagna in cast iron, etc. I love ribs, chicken & all the normal goodies, but my enjoyment is figuring out how EVERYTHING can be better in an outdoor cooker.

WareZdaBeef
09-08-2016, 07:01 PM
One trick i use to get a better bark on Brisket is to inject high gelatin homemade beef stock overnight in a bag to let the liquids equalize. Then pat dry and dry brine in a 1/4 inch layer of kosher salt on both sides for two hours to draw in salt and draw out moisture. Then rinse and pat dry again. Then use a rub without salt , like pepper,onion powder,garlic powder,and sugar.

Its a bit time consuming but has produced the best bark to date on a brisket ive done.

Groundhog66
09-08-2016, 07:03 PM
Because I come from a culinary, and Asian, background, the use of many different spices comes naturally to me. I do tend to cook simple flavors with BBQ, just as that is my preference.

I also still use my Pig Honey mop when cooking ribs and chicken, which does include fish sauce and sometimes soy sauce or Japanese Worcestershire sauce.

I have yet to try that stuff out, perhaps one day...

Fwismoker
09-08-2016, 07:30 PM
This is my favorite way to do ribs.

http://i1226.photobucket.com/albums/ee407/Amerivet/007/Octoforks%20cooks/IMG_0343_zpsblkmxe7j.jpg (http://s1226.photobucket.com/user/Amerivet/media/007/Octoforks%20cooks/IMG_0343_zpsblkmxe7j.jpg.html)

Jason TQ
09-08-2016, 07:36 PM
The first thing that came to mind when reading this thread is maybe the most important lesson I've learned when it comes to cooking......write stuff down! I don't know how many times over the years I've tried stuff, loved it, then had trouble repeating it because I didn't write down what I did....I forget whole recipes and dishes for years because I didn't write it down.....I learned though, I keep notes in a recipe box and its makes things so much easier to repeat and tweek. I know it's not just a BBQ tip, but it's definitely worth while in my opinion.

I like using google docs as you can access things from any device wherever I am. I also have hard saved versions of important things just in case. There are of course similar applications.

bob3
09-08-2016, 11:01 PM
How about trying different cuts of meat? I occasionally see some other things on here, but most posts and my cooks are dominated by brisket, ribs, butts and chicken. What's a ribeye taste like it you take it to 203? I have yet to try a smoked chuckie.

ShadowDriver
09-09-2016, 12:26 AM
How about trying different cuts of meat?... I have yet to try a smoked chuckie.

Bob... you've gotta do a chuckie. I can mainly speak for taking the chuckie South of the Border for some killer Barbacoa (a la SteveKing (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showpost.php?p=3454913&postcount=6))

I hope to cook more offal in the future. I've just moved into the middle of cattle country... and want better access to beef tongue, and other random assortments of bits. I've had some of this randomness in Thailand... but would be interested to see what we can do back here in the US.

TXBronco
09-09-2016, 12:36 AM
I want to infuse some bacon grease with herbs. I've seen people do that with olive oil. It'd be a good combo to inject with I think. Bacon flavored herb grease inside a pork butt...yes please.

RolandJT
09-10-2016, 12:46 PM
Different cuts of meat:
fresh hams low and slow to 190 and hold for at least 4-5 hours makes amazing PP. The secret is low and slow and the minimum 4 hour hold.

Beef shoulder roast at 300 till 150 IT, and then a light braise and shred/pull as per pepper stout beef.

Pork sirloin H&F till 145 then hold wrapped in BP for 1-2 hours--makes really good sandwiches chopped and lightly sauced.

Key idea = try a cut not usually BBQ and make adjustments till it works. Some are as good as the traditional equivalent (try the ham fresh ham thing, really).

Swine Spectator
09-10-2016, 04:37 PM
I've got a rack of spares on the WSM right now. I'm about 1:45 in. I am going to mix up a spray bottle with apple juice, peach nectar, brine (saltwater), molasses, and cider vinegar. Portions TBD.

Standby for updates.

Hoss
09-10-2016, 11:12 PM
You may,might,make something unique.You may refine your technique.You are free to explore the realms of where your uniqueness takes you.There is a reason REAL BBQ(Barbacoa) has been cooked low and slow forever.Many before you have disputed it and many after will also.Not saying that you cannot infuse your own flair(your bizzness).It has worked for a few hundred years and I personally like it.Juzt sayin that to each their own.That said,I do not want my BBQ to tastes like anything but smoked,roasted pork.I tried an APL recipe ONCE! Nope,not my thing,My own fault ,ruined a prime rib.

krex1010
09-10-2016, 11:17 PM
Bob... you've gotta do a chuckie. I can mainly speak for taking the chuckie South of the Border for some killer Barbacoa (a la SteveKing (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showpost.php?p=3454913&postcount=6))

I hope to cook more offal in the future. I've just moved into the middle of cattle country... and want better access to beef tongue, and other random assortments of bits. I've had some of this randomness in Thailand... but would be interested to see what we can do back here in the US.

Offal is highly underrated, it's a different taste but once you can accept the differences, it's really delicious.....whenever I get a deer, it's tradition to grill up the liver and heart first, I do the same with rabbits, squirrels etc...keep it simple and most importantly fresh, offal goes south quick. If you want to try some supermarket items, I always recommend people start with chicken livers, they're mild compared to beef livers and super easy to prepare, lightly dredged in flour or plain, sautéed in butter, sprinkle with kosher salt and serve with a little lemon or a dash of hot sauce, you'll be a fan.

IamMadMan
09-11-2016, 07:46 PM
I followed this post with interest, but I'd like to touch on the basic starting point...

A two dollar steak, will always taste (or lack of) like a cheap two dollar steak. Getting good quality meat is essential. It doesn't have to be prime, but physically look at the meat for ones with better marbling.

It won’t matter what kind of lipstick you put on a pig, tough meat cannot be disguised. Whether it be it pork or beef, getting a better cut and grade of meat will make all the difference in the world.

If there’s going to be a 12 hour commitment to smoke a brisket, don’t waste the time by cutting corners with the cheapest possible piece of beef.


.

CountryBoyQ
09-11-2016, 08:57 PM
I followed this post with interest, but I'd like to touch on the basic starting point...

A two dollar steak, will always taste (or lack of) like a cheap two dollar steak. Getting good quality meat is essential. It doesn't have to be prime, but physically look at the meat for ones with better marbling.

It won’t matter what kind of lipstick you put on a pig, tough meat cannot be disguised. Whether it be it pork or beef, getting a better cut and grade of meat will make all the difference in the world.

If there’s going to be a 12 hour commitment to smoke a brisket, don’t waste the time by cutting corners with the cheapest possible piece of beef.


.
You are 100% right