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Just BS
12-18-2015, 01:45 PM
I picked up a nice bone in, prime rib roast for Christmas... The butcher also had a prime whole packer brisket, so I grabbed that too. My plan is to serve the roast for Christmas Eve with my kids and their families and then smoke the brisket overnight for Christmas Day with my brother and his family. I'd like to remove the bones from the roast and smoke those as a rack of ribs next to the brisket.

Should I remove the ribs prior to smoking the roast, or afterwards?

Bbq_lover
12-18-2015, 02:08 PM
I would roast the prime rib whole, with bones. The ribs on the prime rib hold a lot of fat and aren't the same as plate ribs. I would cook the prime rib with the bones, and if you want to serve without them, then remove the bones at that point. This is just my opinion. Last time I tried to naw on a prime rib bone, it just had very little meat and a lot of fat.

landarc
12-18-2015, 02:33 PM
Personally, I don't much care for the bones off of a Prime Rib smoked, there just isn't enough meat left. On the other hand, they really do improve the quality of the cook for the Prime Rib. I always try to get bone on for that reason.

mjpmap
12-18-2015, 03:00 PM
You can filet the roast off the bones when it is uncooked. Then use butcher string to tie it back to the rib rack. While its cooking you get the benefit of the bone flavor, but when it is done, you just cut the string and have your boneless prime rib.

cb25
12-18-2015, 03:02 PM
Last (and only) prime rib I cooked, I left the bones on.

They basically fell off when I grabbed them and I had myself a little treat.

I'd cook, then separate - I did it by accident and it was awesome.

itschris
12-18-2015, 03:58 PM
You can filet the roast off the bones when it is uncooked. Then use butcher string to tie it back to the rib rack. While its cooking you get the benefit of the bone flavor, but when it is done, you just cut the string and have your boneless prime rib.

I totally agree. This is what I do. I usually ask the butcher to cut and tie the bones. They're usually happy to do so.

haunas
12-18-2015, 04:01 PM
Keep the bones on for the smoke then wait till interior reaches slightly below the temp you want. Pull out and cool/rest. Cut the bones plus an inch or so of meat off the bones, re-season the bones and cut meat. Put bones on smoker and re-smoke and sear the outside of the boneless roast. But I was lazy and finished in an oven.Trying to get some of my pics up that I did.

cheez59
12-18-2015, 05:53 PM
I fillet the bones off about 90% of the way but leave some meat hanging on. I also don't get real close to the bones so as to leave a little extra meat on the bones. I season the meat all the way around and then tie the bones to the roast. When the meat hits 120 I cut the strings and remove the meaty bones. Then I crank up the fire real hot to sear the part where the bones were as well as the rest of the chunk.. Meanwhile I gnaw the bones like a big Rottweiler. They are really good doing them the way I do them.:icon_smile_tongue:

Eddiecalder
12-18-2015, 07:59 PM
I usually follow the amazingribs.com prime rib recepie and it always come out great. I remove the ribs.

http://amazingribs.com/recipes/beef/prime_rib_roast.html

JD08
12-18-2015, 09:15 PM
I don't remove the ribs until after the PR is cooked. Then they come off easily with the first swipe of the electric knife. I used to ask for them cut and tied on, but it's just as easy to cut them yourself. Then put on some rub and put them on at 225 for about 5 hours and enjoy a nice little treat.

McGruber
12-19-2015, 12:52 AM
I would keep them together as long as possible based on my cooks.

lantern
12-19-2015, 04:19 AM
I fillet the bones off about 90% of the way but leave some meat hanging on. I also don't get real close to the bones so as to leave a little extra meat on the bones. I season the meat all the way around and then tie the bones to the roast. When the meat hits 120 I cut the strings and remove the meaty bones. Then I crank up the fire real hot to sear the part where the bones were as well as the rest of the chunk.. Meanwhile I gnaw the bones like a big Rottweiler. They are really good doing them the way I do them.:icon_smile_tongue:

That's almost identical to what I do.


As far as the original question goes, you could save the ribs after the roast hit the desired temp instead of wolverining them like I do and finish them the next day. They will become tender but there will not be much meat to justify the effort in my opinion.

Demosthenes9
12-19-2015, 05:26 AM
You really don't get any added flavor from cooking bone on. Additionally, leaving the bones on prevents you from seasoning the underside of the roast, prevents the development of a nice crust on the underside and inhibits smoke penetration on the bottom side as well.

If you want to smoke the bones, do them separately.

halbop89
12-19-2015, 10:21 AM
I have been cooking prime rib for over 30 years both boneless and bone in. #1 thing use Choice or Prime cut, Not Select. Cook low and slow, Leave the bones on while cooking/smoking. They help hold in juices ( some what seal the bottom off) and add flavor. Another thing I learned is to brush the exposed meat with kitchen bouquet to help seal up the roast before cooking. Just cut them off after done resting and just before serving. Pat LaFrieda meats has a video on how to remove the bones. My 2 golden Retrievers love them:icon_smile_tongue:

LMAJ
12-19-2015, 11:31 AM
I remove the bones and tie them back on. Makes carving a breeze.

bvbull200
12-19-2015, 12:16 PM
You really don't get any added flavor from cooking bone on. Additionally, leaving the bones on prevents you from seasoning the underside of the roast, prevents the development of a nice crust on the underside and inhibits smoke penetration on the bottom side as well.

If you want to smoke the bones, do them separately.

I agree, here. I've done a handful of them bone on, bone off, and bone tied back on. The best, most evenly cooked prime ribs are always the ones with the bones removed completely. Edge to edge medium rare, seasoned all the way around, and every slice is seared on all edges.

I use drums, so it'll be a little different for the horizontal offset guys, but I put the ribs on the lower rack, no diffuser, and cook the ribs about as long as the roast. The ribs get seared while the prime rib cools just enough to keep from cooking too much when it gets seared. The result is some great little rib appetizers and an excellent prime rib for the main course.


Edit: Here is a good article on the bone-in vs boneless meats.

http://amazingribs.com/tips_and_technique/mythbusting_bone-in_meat_is_better.html