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cheez59
12-12-2015, 06:56 AM
I am going to smoke a 6 or 7 bone standing rib for our family Christmas dinner. I plan to run the WSM at 275-300 and use some hickory for flavor. It has been a lot of years since I did this and then it was on my Primo Oval XL. We plan to eat at around 4 pm so I need a guideline of how long it should take to cook the beef. TIA

cheez59
12-12-2015, 07:01 AM
We also have a few folks who do not like any pink in their meat. I know right. About half of us like rare/med. rare. Should I cut the roast in half and cook to two different temps in order to please everyone? I had thought about cooking to 120 and slicing a few pieces off and throwing them on the gasser to finish them for the well done crowd.

smoke ninja
12-12-2015, 08:00 AM
Yup a quick sear or dunk in hot ju will get the slices up to temp for the medium and up crowd

Metron
12-12-2015, 08:37 AM
My vote is cook to Rare or Medium Rare and then like you wrote, finish to desired temps beyond those on your gas grill or skillet on stove or in Au Jus like Smoke Ninja suggested. I'd only cut the roast in half if the ratio of Well to Rare/Medium Rare diners is about 50/50.

Can't really help on the time as the biggest Rib Roast I've cooked was a 4 bone rack that took 4+ hours at 225-250 to get to the high side of Medium.

Are you dead set on cooking at 275-300? If not, this is the method I use for doing a Rib Roast:

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2009/12/perfect-prime-rib-beef-recipe.html

I cook at around 250 instead of 200 because no one in my house or usual guests like anything less than Medium and it shaves around an hour off the cook time. Then sear over coals if cooking outside or in a hot oven. Your gasser would be perfect here and for furthering the cuts for the Well done eaters. You can also use the base of the WSM.

ShadowDriver
12-12-2015, 08:50 AM
I think you have a solid plan, brother. It's much easier to cook a couple of pieces a little longer to spec vs. the whole she-bang.

The plan sounds delicious. Rather envious of your guests.

Jason TQ
12-12-2015, 12:39 PM
Good luck. Let us know how it goes!

Demosthenes9
12-17-2015, 03:36 AM
Cook time for PR isn't determined by weight, but rather by thickness of the PR along it's shortest side. A 20# PR that is 18 inches long, 8 inches front to back and 5 inches thick will take the same amount of time to cook as a 10# PR that is 9 inches long, 8 inches from front to back and 5 inches thick.

At 275-300, presuming the PR comes right from the fridge, you are probably looking at about 2-3 hrs. At those temps, the PR slices will have a kind of "bullseye" effect where there will be a band of well done on the outer edges, midwell just in from that,. then medium, etc.

http://foodnetwork.sndimg.com/content/dam/images/food/fullset/2012/2/17/0/IL0301ZH_herb-crusted-prime-rib-roast_s4x3.jpg


If you want a more consistent edge to edge color, go with a chamber temp of 250 or less.

http://www.foodchannel.com/media/uploads/_thumbs/prime_rib_jpg_1280x800_q85.jpg






For those that want midwell to well, I would have a hot (but not boiling) au jus bath to steep their slices in to bring them up to desired temp/taste. Remember, you can always apply heat and cook meat more. You can't uncook what is already done.

cheez59
12-17-2015, 05:20 AM
Cook time for PR isn't determined by weight, but rather by thickness of the PR along it's shortest side. A 20# PR that is 18 inches long, 8 inches front to back and 5 inches thick will take the same amount of time to cook as a 10# PR that is 9 inches long, 8 inches from front to back and 5 inches thick.

At 275-300, presuming the PR comes right from the fridge, you are probably looking at about 2-3 hrs. At those temps, the PR slices will have a kind of "bullseye" effect where there will be a band of well done on the outer edges, midwell just in from that,. then medium, etc.

http://foodnetwork.sndimg.com/content/dam/images/food/fullset/2012/2/17/0/IL0301ZH_herb-crusted-prime-rib-roast_s4x3.jpg


If you want a more consistent edge to edge color, go with a chamber temp of 250 or less.

http://www.foodchannel.com/media/uploads/_thumbs/prime_rib_jpg_1280x800_q85.jpg






For those that want midwell to well, I would have a hot (but not boiling) au jus bath to steep their slices in to bring them up to desired temp/taste. Remember, you can always apply heat and cook meat more. You can't uncook what is already done.

This is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks a bunch.

Demosthenes9
12-17-2015, 03:01 PM
This is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks a bunch.


You're welcome...