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scrub puller
12-12-2015, 02:41 AM
Yair why is it folks always cook such huge slabs of meat?

There is only just the two of us at our place and we prefer brisket cold in sandwiches or with salad.

I just slice (say) a twelve pounder into five or six pieces and cook a piece along with a pork shoulder or maybe some silverside . . . they come off the drum at different times of course.

Makes for a nice selection of cold cuts and I get to run the drum every week.

Cheers.

IamMadMan
12-12-2015, 07:05 AM
Cooking a whole brisket is usually done to feed a large group of individuals. Yet others, like myself, will sometimes cook a whole brisket knowing it will not be completely eaten with the intention on dividing it and vac-sealing the cooked brisket for another meal.

I like to keep at least one five pound piece of brisket and five pounds of pulled pork vac-seled in the freezer for when unexpected guests arrive hours before dinner. Just drop the bag in hot water and in about 30 minutes the meat is at a safe serving temperature. People cannot believe it was frozen and reheated, they always say it tastes like it was just cooked.

The vac-seal route also works when both the wife and I have busy schedules and don't have time to cook, so I seal smaller amounts of everything: Ribs, Pulled Pork, Brisket, Chicken, and even side dishes like baked beans, and mac and cheese just for these purposes. Sides can be heated in the same manner or in a microwave dish.

The smaller sealed bags are also great when I'm sick and just don't have the energy to cook yet I'm craving some BBQ. Easy Peasy all the way.

Also works great with big pots of chili, stews, and many other things. I would have to say the Weston Vac-Sealer gets as much use as the cooker does.

Sorry to digress, but many people will cook a smaller piece of brisket flat for their needs, so in the end it's a matter of choice and preference. However, I think the larger briskets have more flavor than the smaller pieces I have cooked, but it could just be my imagination.

blazinfire
12-12-2015, 08:09 AM
Its pretty much a matter of choice! Exactly what IAMMADMAN says. Myself I cooked a whole brisket last night, we're making sandwiches out of it tonight, the rest is MINE. No one else will eat it. So I'm gonna vac seal and freeze it, or give some away (maybe). But It will probably be gone by the end of the week anyways. I like left overs.

Nuco59
12-12-2015, 08:34 AM
Ok- I know this one. Because it's brisket? :grin: Just me and the wife too- but every weekend something is on one of my cookers. Sometimes a lot- sometimes a little- but it's cooking.

Jason TQ
12-12-2015, 09:01 AM
Because this is America :-D

Seefyre
12-12-2015, 10:14 AM
Because I need a reason to be out of the house feeding the sticker burner all day and some of the night. A small piece of beef wouldn't justify all that firewood and beer. :whoo:

Thatgrimguy
12-12-2015, 10:42 AM
Because. Brisket.

dwfisk
12-12-2015, 10:54 AM
I'd like to try and learn something here.

I cook whole packers, almost always around 15# each because
(1) that is what I can get at good price
(2) I think cooking the whole packer with a modest trim produces a better taste, texture and tenderness, and
(3) as mentioned it freezes well in a vacuum bagger for later consumption.

Now, that said, I've never tried to cook a smaller part of a brisket. Does a smaller piece, say a couple pounds of the flat get the same taste, texture and tenderness of a whole packer? If it does, then I don't see anything wrong with cooking smaller pieces.

Bludawg
12-12-2015, 11:00 AM
I cook for ME I have no issue with cooking a packer and devouring the entire thing over a weeks time.

pjtexas1
12-12-2015, 11:01 AM
I waste a fair amount of brisket. Only 2 of us now and my wife is allergic to beef. I get lucky sometimes and find them under 10LBS.they shrink pretty good so there isn't a whole lot to eat. I have cut them lengthwise so there is point in each piece on a really big brisket. I say keep doing what you are doing if it works for you. Maybe get a grinder and make hamburger? Every time I trim a brisket I wish I had a grinder.

Ron_L
12-12-2015, 12:23 PM
I'd like to try and learn something here.

I cook whole packers, almost always around 15# each because
(1) that is what I can get at good price
(2) I think cooking the whole packer with a modest trim produces a better taste, texture and tenderness, and
(3) as mentioned it freezes well in a vacuum bagger for later consumption.

Now, that said, I've never tried to cook a smaller part of a brisket. Does a smaller piece, say a couple pounds of the flat get the same taste, texture and tenderness of a whole packer? If it does, then I don't see anything wrong with cooking smaller pieces.

Yep! Plus, you stand better chance at getting a nice, thick flat with bigger packers.

Brisket chili is a great use for the leftovers!

scrub puller
12-12-2015, 01:17 PM
Yair . . .

Gotcha folks, thanks for replies.

I was just curious, cooking smaller pieces works for me and we note little change in taste or texture.

I just thaw and cook as needed, as mentioned, we seldom have it hot but a nice piece of slow cooked brisket sure is comforting to pick on in the fridge. (big grin)

I have never bothered with the vac-seal gear as we never have any "left overs" and I have never thought it helped much when freezing down fresh uncooked meat.

I don't post much but come here often and really do appreciate the knowledge, helpfulness and courtesy of the folks on this site.

Cheers.

landarc
12-12-2015, 01:18 PM
I live alone, and I also prefer to cook whole packers, in the 12 to 15 pound range. In my opinion, it produces a better product. I also do not separate and prefer a very light trim for home cooking. I believe the smaller pieces of flat dry out, and the points alone are hard to come by, and honestly, I am finding that they are kinda too fatty for me anymore. Whereas, eating the point and flat slices is perfect.

mjpmap
12-12-2015, 01:47 PM
Just two of us as well. Agree completely with the Madman. Unbelievable how fresh everything tastes after just warming in hot water.

mikemci
12-12-2015, 03:01 PM
As others have said, I am cooking for two, but it is ALWAYS whole packers. Vac seal and heat in almost boiling water, whenever the weather isn't the best, or I just get the hankering for brisket. The texture, moistness and flavor doesn't suffer or degrade.

smoke ninja
12-12-2015, 03:30 PM
I like having xtra. It takes so long to fix that i might as well make more. Hard to justify all that time for one meal. Always a few chunks of frozen texas style brisket in the freezer.

SmokinJohn
12-14-2015, 01:32 PM
It's two of us now that my son is in college, but....

I have neighbors and friends that love brisket.

So I slice the flats and give them some, save the rest for sandwiches, and keep the burnt ends for me and the mrs.

KevinJ
12-14-2015, 02:05 PM
Yep! Plus, you stand better chance at getting a nice, thick flat with bigger packers.

Brisket chili is a great use for the leftovers!I just used the last 3lbs of a flat to make chili for the first time I make a lot of chili in the winter and it's the best I've ever made.

GA1dad
12-14-2015, 03:19 PM
Because sometimes I need a favor from the maintenance guy,,,, or some other willing participant of the "I'll scratch your back if you'll scratch mine" club. You just never know what a small baggie of brisket (or pork ) can lead to in the future,,,,,:-D

quamdar
12-14-2015, 03:32 PM
Was just at Costco today getting some pork belly (bacon Xmas presents) and I saw today a choice flat was 8 pounds I think and $42 while a 15 pound whole prime packer was $46. So that's one reason too haha

cayenne
12-14-2015, 04:35 PM
Yair why is it folks always cook such huge slabs of meat?

There is only just the two of us at our place and we prefer brisket cold in sandwiches or with salad.

I just slice (say) a twelve pounder into five or six pieces and cook a piece along with a pork shoulder or maybe some silverside . . . they come off the drum at different times of course.

Makes for a nice selection of cold cuts and I get to run the drum every week.

Cheers.

Well, I'm a single guy living alone currently, between girlfriends...and I still cook whole briskets, and other cuts.

My reason?

LEFTOVERS!!!
:)

I often cook whatever in large quantities and eat on them all week. Even when not smoking...I may cook 2-4 entrees and some sides on Sunday, my cooking day. I like to cook. But I do this and have lunches and dinners for most of the week.

A whole brisket, I may eat by itself, or in sandwiches. Towards the end of the week, I may throw it in a pot and make chili out of it.

I"ll often grill a number of things on Sundays...meats veggies and then during the week, I can put them together quickly in a number of ways, so that I don't get tired of eating the same meals...I"ll make pita sandwiches out of them with maybe some tzakili (sp?) sauce, I'll at them in salads. I may throw them in a soup....etc.

I rarely if EVER eat fast food out. It isn't that cheap really...it is bad for you, and frankly it isn't all that tasty. I'd rather cook my own flavorful food from scratch, know what is going into it....and maybe a couple times of month, I'll treat myself out to a REAL restaurant...something where Ii'll drop a little coin on good service good wine selection and foods that even I might not take on cooking myself...etc.

So, there's lots of reasons. Not to mention, I have a lot of friends visiting and I always have something to feed a crowd if they come over.

So, that's it with me.

Oh yeah...I prefer to buy in bulk. Typically on a weekend...I only have to hit the grocery store for a very few items, things that don't keep like onions, lettuce...veggies like that.

I like to buy in bulk, get the discount and have most of whatever I feel like cooking on hand at any given time.

But I guess the one word answer is....LEFTOVERS. I love'em.

cayenne

pal156
12-14-2015, 09:10 PM
I agree leftovers :clap:

cowgirl
12-14-2015, 09:16 PM
Same here!
I cook for me and always smoke a whole packer. The leftovers are handy for quick meals.