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Doug Crann
12-10-2015, 07:36 PM
Just shipped some smoked cheese to a friend. We are in Washington, Kevin is in CA. Out of 19 vacuum sealed packs 1 of them lost the seal. I checked them 3 times prior to shipping, they were all good. They sat sealed in our fridge for 14 days prior to shipping. Beginning to wonder if the pressure changes had anything to do with it?

mchar69
12-10-2015, 07:56 PM
Easy to nick a piece of plastic and lose the seal - more so when frozen.
1 of 19 is a really good percentage. I have more issues than that in my freezer. Doubt the pressure of air had anything
to do with it, since there was nearly zero air in your vac paks.
Plus - friend got smoked cheese. Neg - I didn't get any:(

Doug Crann
12-10-2015, 08:56 PM
Easy to nick a piece of plastic and lose the seal - more so when frozen.
1 of 19 is a really good percentage. I have more issues than that in my freezer. Doubt the pressure of air had anything
to do with it, since there was nearly zero air in your vac paks.
Plus - friend got smoked cheese. Neg - I didn't get any:(
I packed them in the box...all were sealed. Didn't like the way I packed the box so I dumped it and redid it, checking them all again. They were all still sealed....This was after 14 or so days in my fridge. Frustrates me.......

Ozzie Isaac
12-10-2015, 10:21 PM
Did you double seal? I hit mine with a second seal.

I don't think the pressure change would affect it, unless you had a lot of air in the bag.

jwtseng
12-10-2015, 10:33 PM
Most likely the result of knicks in the plastic from handling, especially banging against each other in and out of the freezer. Less likely is failure along the seal, although double sealing is a good idea. The normal vac bags are 3 mil, but I would recommend going to 4 mil bags or thicker.

Doug Crann
12-10-2015, 10:41 PM
Did you double seal? I hit mine with a second seal.

I don't think the pressure change would affect it, unless you had a lot of air in the bag.
No double seal...
Most likely the result of knicks in the plastic from handling, especially banging against each other in and out of the freezer. Less likely is failure along the seal, although double sealing is a good idea. The normal vac bags are 3 mil, but I would recommend going to 4 mil bags or thicker.
Like I said earlier, they were all sealed when they were loaded in the box...

blazinfire
12-10-2015, 10:48 PM
That does kinda suck. Having it be sealed for so long, then on a quick trip you have problems. Don't think altitude would effect it since it was already vacuum packed. Did the seal it's self come undone? I have problems once in a while with vacuum bags losing vacuum when not double sealed

yakdung
12-10-2015, 11:10 PM
I always double seal.

ebijack
12-11-2015, 03:36 AM
Typically for me, unless it is a big tear, I won't see a very small rip/hole till the thaw has started to happen. For most things I vac/freeze I wrap in butcher paper after vacuuming which has not failed me yet. The paper protects objects sharp edges from being able to poke thru/tear other objects. I haven't had to double seal as of yet. Just a thought.

IamMadMan
12-11-2015, 06:29 AM
I packed them in the box...all were sealed. Didn't like the way I packed the box so I dumped it and redid it, checking them all again. They were all still sealed....This was after 14 or so days in my fridge. Frustrates me.......

Did you double seal? I hit mine with a second seal.

I don't think the pressure change would affect it, unless you had a lot of air in the bag.


I agree, if you have a vacuum you can't build pressure from a negative pressure unless there is an active culture growing and producing carbon dioxide within the package. The bag or seal itself would have to have a small hole to compromise the bag and let air in.

Some vac-sealers make a narrow seal and some the cheaper machines do not seal well with liquids or food residue in the sealing area. Putting a second seal just above the first seal is a common practice. Although I have never had a problem, I do this when I seal whole cooked briskets or 5 pound bags of pulled pork. Too much to lose and trust it all to just a single seal.

Another thing you could look at is the quality of your sealing bags. Check the thickness and whether ot not they are reinforced with nylon on both sides. Keep in mind the just because you have a sealer made by a company, you do not have to use just their brand of bags.

Weston bags are superior and are 4mil thick with nylon reinforcement. Another good alternative bags are Vac-Master bags which are also reinforced on both sides. Both of these bags if bought in 100 count packages are still cheaper than food-saver buy one get one free.

These are both micro-channel bags the same as food saver. (Do not use chamber bags on a micro-channel machine.)

ArnieTex
12-11-2015, 07:10 AM
The food saver brand and the bags they make for their sealers seems to be very poor quality plus expensive in recent years. Am on my 4th one in the last 12 months. The bags are thinner and the sealers as stated have a very thin seal and apparently don't get hot enough to seal well, especially as already mentioned if their is any kind of moisture or oily residue from the cooked meats.
Had been trying to upgrade from the cheapy $99 one from Sams that had lasted several years, the new series of 3400 models are crap and range from $50 to $175 bucks. In addition they all mechanically hold bag to seal or vacuum and waste at least an inch of bag on both ends to do so.
I'm saving up for a Weston and hoping they don't start getting made in china before I get one, lol.

CakeM1x
12-11-2015, 07:53 AM
I wish I went 4mil when I bought my 2000 count bags due to rough handling in the freezer. These micro tears that let air in after weeks of not noticing annoy me. Anyone want to buy some 6x8 or 10x13 vacmaster bags?:)

To the OP, your package had bacteria giving off gasses or you had a tear. With cheese I'm going with a tear. I've had things that sealed great and placed gently in my freezer and come back a week later and they are loose. Only happens with frozen/items with bones. I've noticed this lately after slowly migrating to my new freezer. Hence my wish i went 4mil complaint.

Porcine Aviator
12-11-2015, 11:14 AM
The pressure question is a good point. If shipped by air, the cabin pressure in the aircraft is maintained at 8000 feet ASL. If the bag expanded during flight it may have not returned to its original size when back at sea level.

I have been buying bags on Ebay-- less expensive and good quality.

THoey1963
12-11-2015, 02:16 PM
I ordered some steaks once from a good company. Received all four of them completely frozen and apparently sealed. Put them in the fridge to slow thaw out. One ended up having a leak and as it thawed the packaging pulled away loose. Again, I couldn't tell when frozen, but as it thawed it came unsealed. The company immediately sent a replacement steak and told me based off my description and picture that they felt the steak was still safe. We ate it and are still here...

IamMadMan
12-11-2015, 04:56 PM
The food saver brand and the bags they make for their sealers seems to be very poor quality plus expensive in recent years. Am on my 4th one in the last 12 months. The bags are thinner and the sealers as stated have a very thin seal and apparently don't get hot enough to seal well, especially as already mentioned if their is any kind of moisture or oily residue from the cooked meats.
Had been trying to upgrade from the cheapy $99 one from Sams that had lasted several years, the new series of 3400 models are crap and range from $50 to $175 bucks. In addition they all mechanically hold bag to seal or vacuum and waste at least an inch of bag on both ends to do so.
I'm saving up for a Weston and hoping they don't start getting made in china before I get one, lol.

The Companies like Foodsaver hope that because you bought their machine, that you will buy their bags. That's were the greatest profit is.

Weston is a great machine, I've had mine for 3+ years and have had no problems. In the summer I seal 10-20 bags a week, so it will hold up with high volume. The only downfall is that it weighs 40+ pounds and needs to be stored on a wheeled cart or in a designated area.

I wish I went 4mil when I bought my 2000 count bags due to rough handling in the freezer. These micro tears that let air in after weeks of not noticing annoy me. Anyone want to buy some 6x8 or 10x13 vacmaster bags?:).

Did you get the nylon reinforced bags or the pouches? I have stuff fall out of the freezer onto the concrete floor with Vac-Master 3 mil reinforced bags and never compromise a sealed bag's integrity.