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Jaredhulon323
12-08-2015, 06:37 PM
I know it isn't bbq, per say but I want to dive into sausage smoking, just a plain pork country sausage. Anything I need to know about?

smokerpa
12-08-2015, 06:48 PM
What don't you know? Let's start there.

mikemci
12-08-2015, 08:13 PM
There are many people here that can help you. What is your specific question?

Jaredhulon323
12-08-2015, 08:15 PM
Consider me new, what's the differences in the curing salts, Temps to smoke at and time

Okie Sawbones
12-08-2015, 08:23 PM
You might want to start here and then ask questions: http://www.lets-make-sausage.com/

mikemci
12-08-2015, 08:30 PM
Pink salt, Cure #1, Prague #1, they are the same thing. This is used for when you are going to "cold smoke". No cure is needed if your smoking method will not expose the meat to temperatures between 40* and 140* for more than 4 hours (also known as hot smoking). We are fortunate here to have a real expert in this field. He goes by IamMadMan. Hopefully, he will be along soon to give you a much better response soon.

mchar69
12-08-2015, 09:33 PM
If it's your first sausage I would just make regular old Country sausage cooked on a grill. Then I'd make breakfast sausage loose - to form into patties- for the pan.
edit: I see you are in Cajun Country - I'd make Boudin!
Using curing salts / Tender Quick means you are cold smoking at 160 or so -
what cooker do you have that can go, and stay that low for a long time?

+1 on IAmMadMan

IamMadMan
12-09-2015, 06:08 AM
I know it isn't bbq, per say but I want to dive into sausage smoking, just a plain pork country sausage. Anything I need to know about?

Consider me new, what's the differences in the curing salts, Temps to smoke at and time

From your posts I can assume you have never made sausage or cured meats before, which is great that you ask things in advance so you can make a safe product. One of the issues with Botulism, once commonly called the sausage disease, is that the spores are all around us even in the soil we walk on. Botulism spores have no odor or off flavor as they colonize themselves in our digestive track and can take up to 30 days (and sometimes longer) before they release enough neuro-toxins to make you ill.

The basics - First, not all sausage is cured, and not all sausage is smoked, there is a vast difference in recipes for fresh sausage and recipes for smoked sausage besides just adding cure or applying smoke.

I suggest you start maybe with some basic reading.... It is import to understand the food safety aspect of the craft as well as the potential health risks involved if you do not properly use and weigh the cure for the meat when required.

Rather than posting long posts to tie up this thread, I will refer you to a printed text for an understanding of the cure and why it's used; you can read The Brethren Smoke Signals Magazine...

Issue #17 starting on page 8 "The Basics"
http://issue18.smokesignalsmagazine.com/

Issue #18 starting on page 58 "Knowing the Cure"
http://issue19.smokesignalsmagazine.com/


If you're really interested in sausage making, then invest in one of these recommended books for sausage making and curing meats....

I would suggest doing some reading before you make the leap so you have an understanding of some of the processes......

There are many great books and guides on sausage making. I am sure almost everyone who posts may have a few recommendations for books on sausage making. These are by far the best books for basic and advanced sausage making. They start with the basics and move forward to help you master the craft of sausage making. Contains true recipes before the use of chemical enhancers/additives, and fillers were added to stretch the amount of production.

While there are many books out there that all contain enough information to get you off to a good start, there are a few books that I highly recommend.

First Recommendation..

Home Production of Quality Meats and Sausages by Stanley Marianski and Adam Marianski
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51%2B6GpQIrQL._AA160_.jpg

This is a book that covers everything from making a smokehouse, to curing meats, and making sausage. Very easy to read with a great collection of recipes and techniques for the beginner. This book is actually two other books ("Meat Smoking And Smokehouse Design" and "Polish Sausages, Authentic Recipes And Instructions") combined into one single book plus more on making sausage and curing meats.


Second Recommendation..

Great Sausage Recipes and Meat Curing by Rytek Kutas and Ben Kutas
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51HsqN0YTgL._AA160_.jpg

This is a definitive book on sausage making. The explanation of how cures work, and what they are for, is worth the price of the book. The smallest quantity the recipes are for is 10 pounds, so a beginner will have to scale down the recipes. It is equally helpful to a beginner or the advanced. Some of the recipes are a little too salty for my taste, but I just reduce the salt in the next batch.


Third Recommendation..

Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing by Michael Ruhlman and Brian Polcyn
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Xa69CUiVL._AA160_.jpg
This is a great book, although it lightly touches the basics, I feel the book is more for an intermediate sausage maker. This takes sausage to the next level with using some top shelf ingredients to make sausages that could be considered in the gourmet classification. Michael Ruhlman has many proven recipes. Have an understanding of the basics before you try to get into the gourmet recipes contained herein.



....
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Okie Sawbones
12-09-2015, 09:39 AM
+1 on the Home Production of Quality Meats and Sausages. The book is 708 pages long, and has 172 recipes. It covers it all.

Jaredhulon323
12-09-2015, 10:45 AM
I have the home production book, and am currently going through it, but i was wondering just what some of the tips of the trade were?

BigBellyBBQ
12-09-2015, 11:20 AM
I follow the guide lines from the sausage maker out of Buffalo, great web site and spice store

IamMadMan
12-09-2015, 07:42 PM
I have the home production book, and am currently going through it, but i was wondering just what some of the tips of the trade were?


The only real tips of the craft are the basics;
1) follow a true and proven recipe
2) use exact weights, the metric scale is more precise
3) keep the meat/mixture/sausage at a safe temperature at all times

The smoker is an ideal place to incubate bacterial growth; a warm, moist, low oxygen environment.

Tips to assist you along the way are mostly proprietary to the type of grinder you are using, the type of sausage stuffer you are using, and the type of casings you are stuffing.