PDA

View Full Version : Favorite knives


Jbone3652
11-10-2015, 12:20 PM
Who has a good suggestion for slicing brisket and ribs? I'm in need of some knives for Christmas.

Novass
11-10-2015, 12:45 PM
I use the dexter 12" hollow edge slicer for brisket and a fillet knife for ribs.

CakeM1x
11-10-2015, 12:47 PM
A thread recently popped up about this. Lots suggested the Victorinox slicer Amazon.com: Victorinox 12-Inch Granton Edge Slicing Knife with Fibrox Handle: Carving Knife: Kitchen & Dining@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31yweAgsXCL.@@AMEPARAM@@31yweAgsXCL

I bought the wusthof brisket slicer Amazon.com: Wusthof 4519-1/36-100 Gourmet 14-inch Brisket Slicer: Carving Knives: Kitchen & Dining@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/313jjMyPqHL.@@AMEPARAM@@313jjMyPqHL about a couple weeks ago and haven't used it on anything yet but was also recommended around here. Went that route to match the rest of my knives (silly I know).

DR
11-10-2015, 12:52 PM
I use the Wusthof 14" from Slamdunkpro for brisket and i use the Foreschners curved boning knife for everything else.

Bludawg
11-10-2015, 12:55 PM
Buck General

landarc
11-10-2015, 01:05 PM
I like my Wusthof Grand Brisket slicer, it was a good purchase. I have a few other slicers that I like, but, they are old and no longer made.

I am one who does not like the Victorinox. Wouldn't take it if it was free.

Pig Headed
11-10-2015, 01:42 PM
I also use the Wusthof Brisket knife. Great knife. Slamdunkpro designed this knife and Wusthof makes it. You may find a cheaper knife, but not a better one.

hogs122
11-10-2015, 02:04 PM
I have the Victorinox 12" slicing knife. Don't think you could go wrong with either it or the Wusthof.

SmokerKing
11-10-2015, 02:06 PM
I have the 14" Victorinox roast beef slicer, sliced up 32 lb.s brisket a couple weeks ago, cuts like butter.

Ol'Joe
11-10-2015, 02:10 PM
Just getca a big Ol Hickory butcher knife, takes a good edge and will cut anything.

PatAttack
11-10-2015, 03:09 PM
I like my Wusthof Grand Brisket slicer, it was a good purchase. I have a few other slicers that I like, but, they are old and no longer made.

I am one who does not like the Victorinox. Wouldn't take it if it was free.

Alright, Bob. Explain yo' self.

DR
11-10-2015, 03:52 PM
The victorinox (Forchner) is a great knife. The boning knife is like $20 and is razor sharp and easy to keep sharp.

mike-cleveland
11-10-2015, 03:56 PM
I picked up a 12" slicer from GFS for like $20. Works great. I only use it for brisket and roasts.

Hog1990
11-10-2015, 04:08 PM
I have the serrated Wusthof slicer. Best one I have compared to Dexter and Victorinox.

buccaneer
11-10-2015, 04:36 PM
I just got told that Hammer Stahl knives had a huge rep in the USA?
Is that true?

Victorinox knives use a tool steel mainly, it is very brittle and chips easily, Pat.
Their high end knives use a low 0.5% carbon steel also. A stainless, basically.
HTH

SmokerKing
11-10-2015, 05:38 PM
I have had Wusthof chef knives for years and purchased my first Victorinox 8" chef's knife last year after reading several reviews matching it against the more expensive European and Japanese knives. The Victorinox knife matches up well against some of the high end European and Japanese knives for about 1/5 the price. They make good ergonomic, durable knives.

I won't be using my 14" roast/brisket slicer on a daily basis. I'll use it a few times a year and imagine it will last my lifetime as long as I don't lose it. If I do, big deal, it's very inexpensive.

landarc
11-10-2015, 06:05 PM
Alright, Bob. Explain yo' self.
I have used them extensively, for years, and it just doesn't feel right to me, and for how I cut, with no adjustments, I leave a lot of slices connected. For some reason, it doesn't work well for me. Beyond that, I just don't care for the handle shape and feel. I wouldn't use it if I had it, and I have far to many knives to have one I don't intend to use.

buccaneer
11-10-2015, 06:29 PM
I have had Wusthof chef knives for years and purchased my first Victorinox 8" chef's knife last year after reading several reviews matching it against the more expensive European and Japanese knives. The Victorinox knife matches up well against some of the high end European and Japanese knives for about 1/5 the price. They make good ergonomic, durable knives.

I won't be using my 14" roast/brisket slicer on a daily basis. I'll use it a few times a year and imagine it will last my lifetime as long as I don't lose it. If I do, big deal, it's very inexpensive.

yeah...reviews.
They get people every time.
The highest end Victorinox knife uses x50CrMoV15 steel, which is sub standard to even Japanese steels from 3 decades ago, and the last ten years have seen some incredible knife steel developers (Japanese and European)produce insanely better steels than the older Japanese ones.
There is no comparison possible between these, they are in vastly different arena's of quality. :yo:

HTH

cueball21
11-10-2015, 06:53 PM
I bought one at the local restaurant supply. It is the same one mentioned by Aaron Franklin in his book. I don't recall the brand name. I gave the book to SIL after I read it so Ican't check. It only cost about $20 but it slices really, really well.

cheez59
11-10-2015, 08:36 PM
I butchered deer and hogs part time (weekends and vacations) with my dad for over 30 years. Every knife we used was Forschner / Victorinox. They take and keep an edge quite well. The brand simply cannot be beaten for the money. Since then I have bought Wusthof and Henckels. They are better knives for sure but in no way are they worth 10 times + the price of the Victorinox. I would venture a guess that 95% of the butcher shops and slaughter houses use Victorinox. But hey if you have plenty of disposable income then go for the high dollar stuff.

buccaneer
11-10-2015, 09:05 PM
I butchered deer and hogs part time (weekends and vacations) with my dad for over 30 years. Every knife we used was Forschner / Victorinox. They take and keep an edge quite well. The brand simply cannot be beaten for the money. Since then I have bought Wusthof and Henckels. They are better knives for sure but in no way are they worth 10 times + the price of the Victorinox. I would venture a guess that 95% of the butcher shops and slaughter houses use Victorinox. But hey if you have plenty of disposable income then go for the high dollar stuff.

Some of this is accurate.
I like the look on my friends face when we talked about this.
He has a butcher business and we were in the back where I was showing him some American cuts.
He asked about my high carbon Japanese knife, and I let him cut with it.
He was all "Holy crap, this is deadly, how much is it?"
I asked him what his crew uses, (SWBO knives) and how many they go through after he said my knife was too expensive.
My knife is 26 years old and perfect, the look on his face was priceless. The money they would have saved, and would have had the joy and efficiency for all those years.
People will go their own way and whatever way they choose, they will convince themselves it is the right choice.
Good news is, we all feel good about that which we choose, right?

yakdung
11-10-2015, 09:10 PM
Old Hickory and Victorinox 8" chef's knife can't be beat for the money.

lantern
11-10-2015, 09:13 PM
I have used them extensively, for years, and it just doesn't feel right to me, and for how I cut, with no adjustments, I leave a lot of slices connected. For some reason, it doesn't work well for me. Beyond that, I just don't care for the handle shape and feel. I wouldn't use it if I had it, and I have far to many knives to have one I don't intend to use.

That's EXACTLY what I do with mine. I use a terribly cheap cimeter that does a better job with my slicing style. Not a knock on the victorinox in general, just that I refuse to change my style for a knife when there are so many options.



....The funny thing is that I have a horrible time getting rid of ANY knife. So I have every decent knife I've ever bought that isn't in pieces no matter how little they cost me.:heh:

mike-cleveland
11-10-2015, 09:17 PM
I have multiple knives. Got the high carbon one Bucc recommended that is scary sharp, a cheap GFS chef's knife, and a Henkel Chefs knife, along with various others. Most good knives are sharp when you buy them but the real test is maintaining over time. Also I need better knife storage, putting them all in a drawer is not good. My good knives get seperated so they don't bang into stuff and mess up the edge. But for a nice brisket slicer you want a long edge so that you don't have to saw. You want to pull thru it and get it cut in the least motion as possible.

cheez59
11-10-2015, 09:21 PM
Some of this is accurate.
I like the look on my friends face when we talked about this.
He has a butcher business and we were in the back where I was showing him some American cuts.
He asked about my high carbon Japanese knife, and I let him cut with it.
He was all "Holy crap, this is deadly, how much is it?"
I asked him what his crew uses, (SWBO knives) and how many they go through after he said my knife was too expensive.
My knife is 26 years old and perfect, the look on his face was priceless. The money they would have saved, and would have had the joy and efficiency for all those years.
People will go their own way and whatever way they choose, they will convince themselves it is the right choice.
Good news is, we all feel good about that which we choose, right?

I would absolutely love to use a nice Japanese knife...but. In a slaughterhouse you are boning constantly and slicing hard and fast against a cutting board. Any knife will get dull no matter how well it is made. Then you grab another knife that is sharp. At the end of the day you sharpen your knives with what is basically a belt sander. If you have several dull knives and you just spent 12 hours on your feet you are not going to take the time to hone them and strop them properly. Believe me I tried many years ago. We use the less expensive knives for this reason.

BBQ Freak
11-10-2015, 09:43 PM
I bought a set of Old Hickory at a great price and love them but they rust if you do not oil them after every use and they are sharper than sharp , lol .

buccaneer
11-10-2015, 10:43 PM
I have multiple knives. Got the high carbon one Bucc recommended that is scary sharp, a cheap GFS chef's knife, and a Henkel Chefs knife, along with various others. Most good knives are sharp when you buy them but the real test is maintaining over time. Also I need better knife storage, putting them all in a drawer is not good. My good knives get seperated so they don't bang into stuff and mess up the edge. But for a nice brisket slicer you want a long edge so that you don't have to saw. You want to pull thru it and get it cut in the least motion as possible.

You can see all the hundreds of pics here with saw marks on their brisket slices, yes, spot on, the blade needs a lot of belly. I use a gyuto or yanagiba on brisket, one long draw and it is cut.

Mike, a cheap practical solution to knife storage in drawers is towels.
I wrap mine tightly in groups and keep them in a drawer. Chef, utility and paring. Santoku and Nakiri. Fish weapons. Pian and deba. So they are opened together for the jobs I have for them.:thumb:

SmokerKing
11-10-2015, 11:00 PM
yeah...reviews.
They get people every time.
The highest end Victorinox knife uses x50CrMoV15 steel, which is sub standard to even Japanese steels from 3 decades ago, and the last ten years have seen some incredible knife steel developers (Japanese and European)produce insanely better steels than the older Japanese ones.
There is no comparison possible between these, they are in vastly different arena's of quality. :yo:

HTH

Unless you're a professional butcher or chef, I'm sure the common Joe could easily struggle with sub-standard steel at an affordable price.

yakdung
11-10-2015, 11:02 PM
I highly recommend these for single knife handling and storage. I have a bunch in several sizes.

http://www.chefsresource.com/4-set-forschner-bladesafe-knife-guards.html

mike-cleveland
11-10-2015, 11:04 PM
Unless you're a professional butcher or chef, I'm sure the common Joe could easily struggle with sub-standard steel at an affordable price.

Yes you can, however you may be replacing them. But at $20 a shot depending on use they can last a bit. Get a good sharpening stone. Maybe a piece of leather to debur. With longer edged blades it becomes harder to keep them sharp and true at home.

mike-cleveland
11-10-2015, 11:06 PM
I highly recommend these for single knife handling and storage. I have a bunch in several sizes.

http://www.chefsresource.com/4-set-forschner-bladesafe-knife-guards.html

I was thinking of going with the pocket and bamboo skewers.

cheez59
11-11-2015, 06:34 AM
Yes you can, however you may be replacing them. But at $20 a shot depending on use they can last a bit. Get a good sharpening stone. Maybe a piece of leather to debur. With longer edged blades it becomes harder to keep them sharp and true at home.

I can make any knife shiny sharp with this in just a couple minutes. They come with several different grit belts. All the way up to 6000 grit strop. The finer grit belts work great for light touchups.

Amazon.com: Work Sharp WSKTS-KO Knife and Tool Sharpener Ken Onion Edition: Home Improvement@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41zHVsFiTSL.@@AMEPARAM@@41zHVsFiTSL

fuzzy1626
11-11-2015, 08:31 AM
Total amateur here. I'm using a 40 year old Cutco slicer and a 8" Pampered Chef...:redface:...:loco:

Diesel Dave
11-11-2015, 08:37 AM
I have Victroinox and Wusthof knives.
I will say my Victroinox hold an edge better. I'm not really happy with the Wusthof knives and they are the high end of their line

GreenDrake
11-11-2015, 08:39 AM
I have a bunch of knives, but the ones I tend to use most are my cheapo Victorinox flexible 5" boning knife and my Shun Nakiri. I love the pinch hold method of a Nakiri, not sure why, but I do enjoy it. I am torn right now because Shun sent me a 50% off coupon for any knife and I am considering the Butchery or Petty in their higher end lineup. Anyone tried these for trimming or general utility?

yakdung
11-11-2015, 12:23 PM
Yes you can, however you may be replacing them. But at $20 a shot depending on use they can last a bit. Get a good sharpening stone. Maybe a piece of leather to debur. With longer edged blades it becomes harder to keep them sharp and true at home.

I have switched to sharping all of my knives utilizing a 1x30 Delta belt sander I picked up for cheap. I have numerous belts from 80 - 6000 grit.
I also utilize a leather strop belt on this setup as well. Something like in the video, but I utilize many more steps. This process is the fastest and produces the best results for my requirements. I was introduced to the method by a rice farmer friend of mine

https://youtu.be/Ptspof6CXOg

jpeisen
11-11-2015, 02:25 PM
I bought one at the local restaurant supply. It is the same one mentioned by Aaron Franklin in his book. I don't recall the brand name. I gave the book to SIL after I read it so Ican't check. It only cost about $20 but it slices really, really well.

Looked it up. The book says "a serrated, 12-inch Dexter-Russell slicing knife, model S140-12SC."

Bludawg
11-11-2015, 02:42 PM
I use poor mans Kydex ( plastic milk jugs) to protect my knives in the drawer. Cut a pattern on paper xfer to the plastic heat it up with a hairdryer and fold it over the blade cut two small notches in the open side and slide on two rubber bands or them pony tail bands, a drop of superglue on the opposite side keeps it in place for a snug fit.

CakeM1x
11-11-2015, 08:34 PM
I use poor mans Kydex ( plastic milk jugs) to protect my knives in the drawer. Cut a pattern on paper xfer to the plastic heat it up with a hairdryer and fold it over the blade cut two small notches in the open side and slide on two rubber bands or them pony tail bands, a drop of superglue on the opposite side keeps it in place for a snug fit.
Made this for my drawer. Knives rest on cork which should retain the edge.
http://oi68.tinypic.com/2hi5oc7.jpg

AZRaptor
11-13-2015, 01:37 AM
Some of this is accurate.
I like the look on my friends face when we talked about this.
He has a butcher business and we were in the back where I was showing him some American cuts.
He asked about my high carbon Japanese knife, and I let him cut with it.
He was all "Holy crap, this is deadly, how much is it?"
I asked him what his crew uses, (SWBO knives) and how many they go through after he said my knife was too expensive.
My knife is 26 years old and perfect, the look on his face was priceless. The money they would have saved, and would have had the joy and efficiency for all those years.
People will go their own way and whatever way they choose, they will convince themselves it is the right choice.
Good news is, we all feel good about that which we choose, right?

I know you brisket knife is Japanese but I didn't catch what brand or knife type it was. Could you expand on that?

Bludawg
11-13-2015, 09:25 AM
Made this for my drawer. Knives rest on cork which should retain the edge.
http://oi68.tinypic.com/2hi5oc7.jpg
That is in the plan for the kitchen remodel next summer:thumb:

Maylar
11-13-2015, 10:35 AM
There's knives, and then there are knives...

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/kofubl2gy24.html

robinfresno
11-13-2015, 12:28 PM
For brisket I use a left-handed Global Yanagi. There is a guy named Budd who has a van/shop called The Pefect Edge; he travels around California and I met him when I used to work in a high-end restaurant. He sharpens all my knives and it's on a different level than I've ever achieved at home. Cool thing is that I had a right handed bread knife and he was able to resharpen the serrations for the opposite side so I can use it left-handed.

buckhorn_cortez
11-14-2015, 10:14 PM
For slicing brisket - Glestain 12.2 inch beef slicer. (http://www.knifemerchant.com/product.asp?productID=6349)