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View Full Version : Vertical Smoker OR gravity feed Vertical ?


jk1975
10-14-2015, 11:01 AM
Hello to everyone

i will need your "lights" !!!

what are the main differences between an insulated Vertical Smoker and a Gravity feed vertical smoker?

Which one you believe is better?

which one can keep even temperature (from top to bottom) for hours easier?

Thanks in advance

pjtexas1
10-14-2015, 11:37 AM
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=218982

Just my opinion...I think an insulated cabinet will work a little better within your guidelines.

SmittyJonz
10-14-2015, 12:03 PM
Humphreys Pint.

Porcine Aviator
10-14-2015, 03:51 PM
This is a good question. I think the performance of these two designs is roughly equivalent.

I can't understand why you would choose to deal with the vagaries of a gravity feed, when the vertical is so easy to use and control. Although the possible bridging of fuel in the chimney of a GF is not statistically high, it is still a factor of concern in an unattended, or overnight cook. In addition, to be certain of avoiding a bridging clog in a GF you probably want to add your wood to the firebox periodically, requiring some attention, which is not necessary in a vertical.

Maybe someone using both designs can explain this?

itschris
10-14-2015, 04:11 PM
I got my Stumps XL Baby... like it so much I got a Stump Classic a couple months later. Now granted I don't have a ton of cooks on these, but I have yet to experience any of the "negatives" that people continually refer to. Every smoker has it's own nuances... EVERY ONE OF THEM DOES.

I have talked to quite a few people who have used Stumps smoker as well as Assassin smokers to the nth degree and have not come across complaints from them either. All of these high end smokers are quality tools that will certainly enable you to make fantastic Q. Whether it's Stumps, Humps, or some other higher end smoker like a Shirley or Yoder... they're all going to have their "things" but they're all going to be fantastic in the end.

I said this in some other thread and it's been the advice I pretty much always give:

My only advice is that once you decide in you heart of hearts which one you want... the one that after all your research and serious contemplation about the present and your future endeavors steers you to and you know to be the one... abandon it and get the next one up in size.

padge31
10-14-2015, 04:48 PM
I have a Stumps XL Baby gf and never had any of those problems. You have to learn your cooker. Some gf smokers with larger shoots can handle lump and some can not. I use Stubbs briquettes and don't have a problem. With gravity fed you can easily keep adding fuel if needed for a real long cook. Just pour it down the shoot.

luv2smoke
10-14-2015, 11:12 PM
I have an insulated reverse flow vertical cabinet and zero experience with a gravity fed unit. I have often wondered what advantage if any would the gravity fed unit have over a insulated cabinet. I've asked the question a couple of times and only got a few replies. The replies consisted mainly about the ease of adding fuel to the gravity fed unit which to me is moot. My insulated cabinet holds 25 lbs of fuel and wood chunks and will cook for 30 + hours @ 250 depending on load, so needless to say I never have to add fuel for a cook nor do I have to add wood for a cook.

SimcoBBQ
10-15-2015, 06:10 AM
I've had both and prefer gravity fed. That's probably a personal preference more than anything. A lot of vertical cabinets use some type of water pan for heat diffusion and I don't car for the hassle of that. Water barrier isn't needed in a gravity fed. Both types of cookers will have pros and cons. Just do a ton of research and pick the cooker that best suits your needs

Enrico Brandizzi
10-15-2015, 06:39 AM
JK
is not my opinion , but Greg Blonder's. He is the scientist behing amazingribs.com.
In his web site he specifys his preference for GRAVITY FED cause the most accurate and efficient combustion

Almost at the end of the page

http://www.genuineideas.com/ArticlesIndex/srawoodfuel.html

GreenDrake
10-15-2015, 06:42 AM
It's probably like most, a tool you get used to. My only concern with a gravity is what is the chance it bridges and I get a chute fire? With my Humphreys Pint, I have a contained fire in a separate chamber. I just got mine so I only have three cooks on it, but it's as easy as it gets for temp control and worry free cooking. Upside of a gravity is the fuel supply for much longer cooks.

Goddahavit
10-15-2015, 07:14 AM
It's probably like most, a tool you get used to. My only concern with a gravity is what is the chance it bridges and I get a chute fire? With my Humphreys Pint, I have a contained fire in a separate chamber. I just got mine so I only have three cooks on it, but it's as easy as it gets for temp control and worry free cooking. Upside of a gravity is the fuel supply for much longer cooks.


no chute fires unless you have a air leak someplace, not possible, if you get a bridge, then basically the fire starves of fuel and goes out.

the difference no one is mentioning is they way the wood gets placed below the fire and the smoke actually goes through the fire again, it provides a clean smoke, light as I personally think it should be.

if you like heavy smoke, or a very pronounced smoke, then the vertical or some other smoker may be better suited, but for me, no water to mess with, smoke as a seasoning, not overpowering, runs for days, yes i have ran my smokers for days, weekends at a time, i like a gravity feed, and yes i have had a reverse flow cabinet, i said had....

you will get alot of advice here even from people that do not have or never used different smokers, in the end keep doing your research, not every smoker is suited to every person.

itschris
10-15-2015, 08:21 AM
no chute fires unless you have a air leak someplace, not possible, if you get a bridge, then basically the fire starves of fuel and goes out.

the difference no one is mentioning is they way the wood gets placed below the fire and the smoke actually goes through the fire again, it provides a clean smoke, light as I personally think it should be.

if you like heavy smoke, or a very pronounced smoke, then the vertical or some other smoker may be better suited, but for me, no water to mess with, smoke as a seasoning, not overpowering, runs for days, yes i have ran my smokers for days, weekends at a time, i like a gravity feed, and yes i have had a reverse flow cabinet, i said had....

you will get alot of advice here even from people that do not have or never used different smokers, in the end keep doing your research, not every smoker is suited to every person.

I agree completely. I think a lot of the horror stories or complaints about gravity feed style smokers are overdone. Hell... I've had bad things happen in my offset. You're dealing with fire... you have somewhat pay attention with any smoker.

cpw
10-15-2015, 08:37 AM
I have a backwoods party and a deep south gravity fed. I like the backwoods because it's smaller and lighter (I use this one at home), and easy to use. I don't like it because of the water pan (I should just replace it with sand or whatever), and it's a mess to clean up the ash and add additional fuel.

I like the gravity fed because it'l hold a ton of meat, it burns for a long time, its easy to refill when necessary. But it's very big and very heavy, which can be a negative.

Red Valley BBQ
10-15-2015, 05:13 PM
which one can keep even temperature (from top to bottom) for hours easier?

270 Smokers are an insulated vertical cabinet with a patented convection draft and can keep stable temps for hours on one load of charcoal. (I once fired two Standard models in competition for 14+ hours on one 20lb bag of lump split between the two WITHOUT the use of a guru or stoker.) Because of the convection, temps are stable throughout the cooker (+/- 5 degrees, top-bottom, front-back, left-right). You can even bake in one if needed.

Porcine Aviator
10-15-2015, 06:12 PM
no chute fires unless you have a air leak someplace, not possible, if you get a bridge, then basically the fire starves of fuel and goes out.

the difference no one is mentioning is they way the wood gets placed below the fire and the smoke actually goes through the fire again, it provides a clean smoke, light as I personally think it should be.

if you like heavy smoke, or a very pronounced smoke, then the vertical or some other smoker may be better suited, but for me, no water to mess with, smoke as a seasoning, not overpowering, runs for days, yes i have ran my smokers for days, weekends at a time, i like a gravity feed, and yes i have had a reverse flow cabinet, i said had....

you will get alot of advice here even from people that do not have or never used different smokers, in the end keep doing your research, not every smoker is suited to every person.

Your statement goes a long way to illustrate the difference in these two designs. I think most people would agree that your point about pushing the wood smoke through the fire is a strong argument for the GF.

cjtiger300
10-15-2015, 06:44 PM
Deep South GF is the way to go if you don't mind the weight of it. Burns like a stick burner. Just an awesome design.

jk1975
10-16-2015, 10:27 AM
Ok guys
thank you every one for your help..
i think i am gonna go with G.F. ASSASSIN 28.
I spoke on the phone twice with Jeff and he gave me this final extra push that i
was looking for.
I will keep you updated....
thanks once again

itschris
10-16-2015, 10:44 AM
You can't go wrong with that. Congrats. Can't wait to see the pics.