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Enrico Brandizzi
10-07-2015, 03:39 PM
This is what I did. But it didn't work.


https://farm1.staticflickr.com/743/21835853090_d334a30f03_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/zgysnG)IMG_6427 (https://flic.kr/p/zgysnG) by Enrico BBQness (https://www.flickr.com/photos/bbqnessdotcom/), su Flickr

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5835/21997787536_574fea67cb_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/zvSpQU)IMG_6433 (https://flic.kr/p/zvSpQU) by Enrico BBQness (https://www.flickr.com/photos/bbqnessdotcom/), su Flickr




https://farm1.staticflickr.com/587/21401169704_2449f95dc6_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/yB9A9y)IMG_6441 (https://flic.kr/p/yB9A9y) by Enrico BBQness (https://www.flickr.com/photos/bbqnessdotcom/), su Flickr


https://farm1.staticflickr.com/749/21835745660_a72156da8a_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/zgxUrs)IMG_6451 (https://flic.kr/p/zgxUrs) by Enrico BBQness (https://www.flickr.com/photos/bbqnessdotcom/), su Flickr


https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5630/21401077434_bd47b72940_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/yB97HG)IMG_6460 (https://flic.kr/p/yB97HG) by Enrico BBQness (https://www.flickr.com/photos/bbqnessdotcom/), su Flickr


https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5801/22011535182_ee11372ec9_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/zx5Sxh)IMG_6471 (https://flic.kr/p/zx5Sxh) by Enrico BBQness (https://www.flickr.com/photos/bbqnessdotcom/), su Flickr


https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5687/21997608656_c1646dc0b8_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/zvRuEL)IMG_6475 (https://flic.kr/p/zvRuEL) by Enrico BBQness (https://www.flickr.com/photos/bbqnessdotcom/), su Flickr


https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5794/21401013864_ef3a965a96_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/yB8MPE)IMG_6477 (https://flic.kr/p/yB8MPE) by Enrico BBQness (https://www.flickr.com/photos/bbqnessdotcom/), su Flickr


https://farm1.staticflickr.com/779/22033653191_74b4a6079a_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/zz3esg)IMG_6484 (https://flic.kr/p/zz3esg) by Enrico BBQness (https://www.flickr.com/photos/bbqnessdotcom/), su Flickr


https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5722/21400979754_7e2c221a19_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/yB8BFy)IMG_6487 (https://flic.kr/p/yB8BFy) by Enrico BBQness (https://www.flickr.com/photos/bbqnessdotcom/), su Flickr


https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5742/21835904498_7b26e6e038_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/zgyHE3)IMG_6488 (https://flic.kr/p/zgyHE3) by Enrico BBQness (https://www.flickr.com/photos/bbqnessdotcom/), su Flickr


https://farm1.staticflickr.com/578/21835590090_453da45895_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/zgx7cd)IMG_6490 (https://flic.kr/p/zgx7cd) by Enrico BBQness (https://www.flickr.com/photos/bbqnessdotcom/), su Flickr


https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5702/21997526746_646e2511f7_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/zvR5jw)IMG_6496 (https://flic.kr/p/zvR5jw) by Enrico BBQness (https://www.flickr.com/photos/bbqnessdotcom/), su Flickr


https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5724/21402039133_c5ca5544fc_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/yBe3AH)IMG_6503 (https://flic.kr/p/yBe3AH) by Enrico BBQness (https://www.flickr.com/photos/bbqnessdotcom/), su Flickr


it looked good but skin was really gummy. NOT crispy at all.
Meat, under the browned surface was pink totally pink. Unbelievable.
Internal Temp was allaround 174-184F.
It shouldn't be pink at all.
what I did wrong?

MS2SB
10-07-2015, 03:42 PM
I like to rub the skin down with some softened butter, it helps crisp the skin, I also start my 1/4s skin side down and finish skin side up.

Not sure at all why you would have those raw spots, that's really odd to me.

Fwismoker
10-07-2015, 03:46 PM
I know people like that method for wings but wings are different. Still a big fan of grilling from a distance for chicken so it gets hit with direct heat. If i was doing quarters in a kettle IMO you would have gotten a better result just banking the coals.

thirtydaZe
10-07-2015, 03:55 PM
i cook chicken thighs once a week, we purposely cook them to much, to long and ooo and ahhh over the totally pink all the way through color. to us, it's the best.

Bludawg
10-07-2015, 04:07 PM
When you peal the skin back you tear a very thin membrane that attaches the skin to the muscle so you have to pin it back in place so that it shrinks to fit. Tooth picks work well and can be removed before serving.To get good bite through skin I use that famous French invention----- Mayonnaise. The egg & oil aid in browning and the acid breaks down the fat and tenderizes the skin. Mix your rub in and brush it on.
https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2899/14146637935_f403c4be2f_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/ny6dAB)
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7312/14146638245_ac56e4be88_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/ny6dFX)
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5482/14146638515_fbc7f46cf1_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/ny6dLB)

Bludawg
10-07-2015, 04:09 PM
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5032/14146835475_75c81f02d7_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/ny7ejt)

ChefJRD
10-07-2015, 04:12 PM
Gonna have to try that mayo trick. That looks awesome!

BB-Kuhn
10-07-2015, 04:15 PM
I know people like that method for wings but wings are different. Still a big fan of grilling from a distance for chicken so it gets hit with direct heat. If i was doing quarters in a kettle IMO you would have gotten a better result just banking the coals.

I do quarters weekly on a kettle. If you were to invest in a cajun bandit stacker for that kettle, and cook the chicken directly over the fire with the newfound elevation? You'd have the best damn chicken you've ever tasted.

Hot fire (full chimney), a couple of wood chunks and 45min of your time.

Fwismoker
10-07-2015, 04:20 PM
I do quarters weekly on a kettle. If you were to invest in a cajun bandit stacker for that kettle, and cook the chicken directly over the fire with the newfound elevation? You'd have the best damn chicken you've ever tasted.

Hot fire (full chimney), a couple of wood chunks and 45min of your time.
Yep it's all that's needed...Fire, and some distance makes some incredible chicken.

Thingfish
10-07-2015, 04:22 PM
Perhaps the temp probe was too close to the bone and read artificially high?

Bludawg
10-07-2015, 04:23 PM
I do quarters weekly on a kettle. If you were to invest in a cajun bandit stacker for that kettle, and cook the chicken directly over the fire with the newfound elevation? You'd have the best damn chicken you've ever tasted.

Hot fire (full chimney), a couple of wood chunks and 45min of your time.
He's cookin on a 26, last I knew they don't make a Bandit that big. Enrico's in Italy so it may not be an option for him even if it's available.

Grillman
10-07-2015, 05:33 PM
it looked good but skin was really gummy. NOT crispy at all.
Meat, under the browned surface was pink totally pink. Unbelievable.
Internal Temp was allaround 174-184F.
It shouldn't be pink at all.
what I did wrong?

If your thermometer is correct, then it is safe to eat.
The color of the meat does not matter as it isn't an
accurate way to tell if chicken is done.
When chicken reaches 165 F it is safe to eat.

Fwismoker
10-07-2015, 05:36 PM
Most people forget that myoglobin is in the working muscles of animals so that's why you see a pink hue in quarters.

Smokedawg86
10-07-2015, 05:59 PM
Blu, what ratio of mayo to rub have you found working for you?

IamMadMan
10-07-2015, 06:02 PM
You did good...

Mayo is great for crisping the skin... I used to use Olive Oil, but Mayo is better.

As far as pink... If your temperature was correct, a pinkish hue is not a worry, it is when the bone still has blood on it that should generate a concern. As fwismoker said, it's a working muscle.

Fwismoker
10-07-2015, 06:28 PM
Even blood coming from around the bones is fine if the chicken is cooked to temp. Bone marrow seeps through the bone because the bones aren't fully hardened. This is a good article from Thermoworks.

http://www.thermoworks.com/blog/2012/02/bloody_chicken/

1MoreFord
10-07-2015, 07:16 PM
If the pink starts immediately under the surface it's a really big smoke ring:doh:

Enrico Brandizzi
10-07-2015, 08:46 PM
[QUOTE=Bludawg;3374011]When you peal the skin back you tear a very thin membrane that attaches the skin to the muscle so you have to pin it back in place so that it shrinks to fit. Tooth picks work well and can be removed before serving.To get good bite through skin I use that famous French invention----- Mayonnaise. The egg & oil aid in browning and the acid breaks down the fat and tenderizes the skin. Mix your rub in and brush it on.

This is my rule for next time! Thanks Blu.

Trailer Trash
10-07-2015, 09:10 PM
I have found all of this as great advice;

"Still a big fan of grilling from a distance for chicken so it gets hit with direct heat."

"To get good bite through skin I use that famous French invention----- Mayonnaise"

"cook the chicken directly over the fire with the newfound elevation. You'd have the best damn chicken you've ever tasted."

"Yep it's all that's needed...Fire, and some distance makes some incredible chicken."

"As far as pink... If your temperature was correct, a pinkish hue is not a worry, it is when the bone still has blood on it that should generate a concern."

If you are very, very serious about your chicken, you could find a steel fabrication shop to "roll" a sheet of 11 gauge steel about 20" wide by a length that equals the circumference of the inside of your kettle lid lip and weld the seam to make your custom staker! It WILL make you some awesome chicken.

In reference to the blood / hemoglobin, I suggest cooking to a temp of a minimum of 172 and maximum of 180. Another helpful tip is to (with a very sharp knife) slit the inside joint at the thighs and wings to let the heat get into that area. It really conquers the "pink / red" issue... Good luck to you! Hope this helps.

IamMadMan
10-10-2015, 11:48 AM
Couldn't remember where I found this, but I hope this helps as well. While it speaks of Turkey, it can apply to all poultry.

Yes, it can be, according to the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) (https://www.google.com/search?q=is+pink+chicken+safe+to+eat&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8), if it has been cooked to a temperature of 165F.


First of all, some meat is naturally pink. According to the USDA "The color of cooked meat and poultry is not always a sure sign of its degree of doneness. Only by using a food thermometer can one accurately determine that a meat has reached a safe temperature. Turkey, chicken, fresh pork, ground beef, or veal can remain pink even after cooking to temperatures of 160F and higher. The meat of smoked turkey is always pink."


In addition, smoked meat turns pink due to a chemical reaction with the combustion gases and the smoke and the meat.

landarc
10-10-2015, 01:06 PM
My experience with a 26" kettle is that the lid can read much higher than the grate temperature, especially at the edges. You kettle setup could result in having an indirect fire at the grate closer to 300F than the 400F you thought you were cooking at. What happens with how you set up that kettle, is there is a column of hot air that pushed up through the fire column, up to the lid, where the thermo is, then vents out. The heat from that super heated air column does cook the chicken, but, with a lower temperature than the air in the lid. Any meat that faces away from the air column, in essence, half of each piece, gets a much lower cook temperature.

IamMadMan
10-17-2015, 04:37 AM
Keeping in mind what the others have said about the temperature should help with getting crispy skin.

Here is an article that addresses your concern about pink meat in chicken thighs....

"Slow cooked barbecue meats often exhibit a pink ring around the outside edge of the product. This pink ring may range from 1/8 inch to 1/2 inch thick. In beef the ring is a reddish-pink and in pork, chicken and turkey it is bright pink. This pink ring is often referred to as a "smoke ring"
and is considered a prized attribute in many barbecue meats, especially barbecue beef briskets. Barbecue connoiseurs feel the presence of a smoke ring indicates the item was slow smoked for a long period of time. Occasionally consumers have mistakenly felt that the pink color of the
smoke ring meant the meat was undercooked. To understand smoke ring formation you must first understand muscle pigment. Myoglobin is the pigment that gives muscle its color. Beef muscle has more pigment than pork muscle thus beef has a darker color than pork. Chicken thighs have a darker color than chicken breast thus chicken thigh muscle has more muscle pigment (myoglobin) than chicken breast tissue. A greater myoglobin concentration yields a more intense pink color".

http://www.smokingpit.com/info/smokering.pdf

1MoreFord
10-17-2015, 04:25 PM
Keeping in mind what the others have said about the temperature should help with getting crispy skin.

Here is an article that addresses your concern about pink meat in chicken thighs....

"Slow cooked barbecue meats often exhibit a pink ring around the outside edge of the product. This pink ring may range from 1/8 inch to 1/2 inch thick. In beef the ring is a reddish-pink and in pork, chicken and turkey it is bright pink. This pink ring is often referred to as a "smoke ring"
and is considered a prized attribute in many barbecue meats, especially barbecue beef briskets. Barbecue connoiseurs feel the presence of a smoke ring indicates the item was slow smoked for a long period of time. Occasionally consumers have mistakenly felt that the pink color of the
smoke ring meant the meat was undercooked. To understand smoke ring formation you must first understand muscle pigment. Myoglobin is the pigment that gives muscle its color. Beef muscle has more pigment than pork muscle thus beef has a darker color than pork. Chicken thighs have a darker color than chicken breast thus chicken thigh muscle has more muscle pigment (myoglobin) than chicken breast tissue. A greater myoglobin concentration yields a more intense pink color".

http://www.smokingpit.com/info/smokering.pdf

You were more thorough and eloquent than I was a few posts earlier.:wink:

IamMadMan
10-18-2015, 06:19 AM
You were more thorough and eloquent than I was a few posts earlier.:wink:

1MoreFord,

Actually it took me more than a few days to find the post I was looking for with this slow Internet link I am dealing with while out of town. It's not my description, but merely a quote from the attached article. Just trying to put Enrico's fear of the pink meat to rest, so he can enjoy it without worries.

krex1010
10-18-2015, 07:16 AM
I know people like that method for wings but wings are different. Still a big fan of grilling from a distance for chicken so it gets hit with direct heat. If i was doing quarters in a kettle IMO you would have gotten a better result just banking the coals.

That's my method on a kettle, let the temp average around 350-375 and the skin usually crisps up nicely. Plus a little time skin side down over the coal(under supervision) if necessary.

superlead73
10-18-2015, 11:32 AM
When you mention distance from the chicken.......is there enough or too much distance in a Pit Barrel to direct cook chicken with lid slightly ajar or even off.

I know that with the lid ajar slightly you can hit temps in the high 300's. And if this is possible....whats a good estimate time wise.....although I would monitor temp with a Thermo pen and Maverick 732.

kajunatwork
10-18-2015, 12:39 PM
I do mine over low direct heat on a 22 inch Weber. One layer of charcoal and close the vents so it runs at around 275 degrees. Flip every 10 to 15 mins until they temp at 180. The fat renders out and the skin turns out nice.

Fwismoker
10-18-2015, 01:41 PM
When you mention distance from the chicken.......is there enough or too much distance in a Pit Barrel to direct cook chicken with lid slightly ajar or even off.

I know that with the lid ajar slightly you can hit temps in the high 300's. And if this is possible....whats a good estimate time wise.....although I would monitor temp with a Thermo pen and Maverick 732.

Distance to the heat source should be relative to how hot it is. You'll be fine with the distance in the PBC, just cook skin side up and then flip down the later in the cook. I play it by ear depending on the fire on when to flip but it's usually 120* to 140*, then the skin side goes down to finish.

On my main chicken cooker the grill grate is 30" above the fire but the fire is pretty dang hot.

superlead73
10-18-2015, 02:44 PM
Thanks guys.....that helps and gives me an idea on what to expect and react to.