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jermoQ
08-30-2015, 05:06 PM
I cooked a flat unwrapped, at 300 until it went to 198 and then pulled off and wrapped to rest for 30. I only trimmed a little to get a 1/4 inch fat cap. I know why it was tough cause it was not cooked enough. However, I thought if I cooked fast and not past 200 it would keep it juicy and it was horribly dry. I am thinking I should have wrapped BUT I was cleaning joking on my pellet grill so I wanted to get as much smoke on it as possible.

Any thoughts? Not sure I ever want to see a flat again but I don't like to give up either.

landarc
08-30-2015, 05:14 PM
An undercooked brisket enters dry territory at around 155F and stays there until it is cooked to tender. As a brisket reaches the medium-done range, it will have expelled much of the water based moisture in the meat to the surface, where it starts to evaporate. Not only does this signal the start of the stall, but, it also indicates that most of the water based moisture is no longer available to the meat.

Brisket flats when properly cooked, derive their moisture largely from the break down of collagen and fats, and secondly from the break down of the cells of the meat, releasing the last bit of water-based moisture into the meat fiber. This only happens when the protein cells break down, and that occurs when the meat gets probe tender.

jermoQ
08-30-2015, 05:24 PM
would the collagen have done better at lower pit temps or just because it was not a high enough finish temp?

landarc
08-30-2015, 05:26 PM
Just not cooked long enough

although I am not a fan of cooking flats alone.

Bludawg
08-30-2015, 05:35 PM
WHY is MY Meat Dry

Allow me to channel my inner Alton Brown.
Critters are held together by collagen it is between the muscle fibers. Blood plasma run through the fibers( Mostly water) Basic Laws of physics tell us that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. What happens when you heat up a pot of water?? When you heat it the molecules move faster and expand when they expand and volume increases until the pot Boils. The same thing happens inside the muscle fibers once the pressures is great enough( the molecules moving rapidly from application of heat) this moisture( water Blood Plasma) is forced to the surface and along with rendering fat enters the atmosphere ( this is the Smell that make ya Hongry).

Pumping in more of a water based solution ( stocks, beer, soda, magic potions, ect) in has no effect on the moisture in the finished product as it is forced out as the fibers constrict and the pressure builds up.
Now back to the Collagen, as the collagen gets hot it undergoes a transformation and turns into gelatin it is the Gelatin that is the Moisture in the meat. God and the Critter put it there all you need to do is extract it through proper cooking. This is why under cooked briskets are DRY and Chewy

Jason TQ
08-30-2015, 05:35 PM
Just not cooked long enough

although I am not a fan of cooking flats alone.

Agree on both parts here. Especially cooking at the higher temps I believe meat takes longer. I keep a probe in my brisket so I know when to start looking and I don't give it the first check for tenderness until 200 and this never fails me. Not saying it 100% will work for you, as your techniques could change some things but it hasn't failed me.

Did you probe it at all for tenderness or just pull at a temp? Using that temp probe for the smooth feel helps a lot.

jermoQ
08-30-2015, 05:53 PM
Did you probe it at all for tenderness or just pull at a temp? Using that temp probe for the smooth feel helps a lot.

I only used probe for temp. I am still learning the "for feel" comfortability but I was concerned about drying it out from to long cooking.

Bludawg, I like Good Eats and I like the science stuff it has.

I thank you all for the help! :thumb:

Bludawg
08-30-2015, 06:02 PM
would the collagen have done better at lower pit temps or just because it was not a high enough finish temp? No two cows are alike this is why cooking to a certain temp more often than not results in a failed cook. the last place to get tender on ANY brisket is the thickest area of the flat. This is where you need to probe it, if the probe meets no resistance with bare minimum pressure applied your there.

Demosthenes9
08-31-2015, 02:09 AM
would the collagen have done better at lower pit temps or just because it was not a high enough finish temp?


Short version is that the lower the chamber temp you cook at, the lower the finish IT (internal temp) will be. The higher the cooking temp, the higher the finish IT.

Longer version is that the breakdown of connective tissue / collagen is a function of temperature over time, or time at temp. The breakdown starts around 140 degrees and the rate of breakdown increases as the temp rises.

So, longer time at lower chamber temps, and shorter time at higher chamber temps for the breakdown to occur. While that process is happening, lower chamber temp leads to lower IT. Higher chamber temp leads to higher IT.


With all that, as others have said, the brisket is done when it's probe tender, not when it reaches a certain IT.

Diesel Dave
08-31-2015, 04:43 AM
Learning the "feel" isn't too hard at all. What you need is a stick of butter.
Leave it out on the counter for the day, take what you use to probe your meat, stick it through the butter. See how that feels, there ya go. Your meat is done at that feeling or just a BIT more resistance.