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smokingkettle
08-28-2015, 01:38 PM
Howdy.

This is my first thread.

I'm a newb to smoking. I really just got into it at the start of the summer and bought an 18.5 WSM. I've spent the better part of the summer perfecting spare ribs, pork butts and swineapple (looked too awesome to resist trying and it turned out great twice). Now that I feel like I'm getting great results, I'm ready to move onto something more challenging.

So Costco had an angus prime 10lb packer brisket for $32 today. I couldn't resist (the marbling brought a tear to my eye). I have it in the fridge right now. I know. I know. I read the forums here after I bought it and everyone is saying "Don't start with an expensive cut." Oh well. I started with prime. No regrets. I'm not scared after reading these forums and it's not the end of the world if it doesn't turn out perfect (which is probable). But for right at $3 per pound on a prime packer cut, I don't look at it as that risky. Besides, if I succeed, I end up with a damn fine dinner.

Here's my plan:

I'm going to get up around 4AM and get the fire going (three chunks of hickory and one chunk of mesquite). While that's happening I'm going to prepare my brisket (light trimming, 1:1 salt/pepper rub) and throw it on the top grate. Then I'm going to set the temperature ranges on my Maverick and pass out for a couple hours. It will beep annoyingly loud and wake me up if I go past or below my range. I'm shooting for a median temperature of 250 (Let me know if you think I should change that).

Then I'm going to do the Franklin method where I look for it to be mahogany after a spray from the bottle. If it is, I'm going to wrap it in parchment paper (I don't have butcher paper). Your thoughts on that are appreciated. Then I will let it go until it's jiggly. Yes, I will resist the urge to pull it early. My target is to have it ready in the middle of the afternoon. I can toss it in a cooler and wrap it in blankets to keep it at the right resting temperature until it is time to serve. My guests are also fine eating as late as 6PM, so I don't think I will have any issues with what time it finishes.

Being new, I'm not going to take it personally if anyone finds a flaw with my method. Your critiques are welcome, as I can assure you that you are better at smoking brisket than I am.

I am just curious about why I should roll without water in the water pan. I get the fact that it burns a little hotter, but is the lack of moisture going to be a problem or does the brisket have enough to where this isn't going to be an issue? If 250 is a good temperature, I can maintain that with water no problem. Anyway, clarification on the water pan questions is appreciated.

I'm really excited about this forum. I have been lurking and have already learned a ton thanks to the contributions of the great members of this forum. I appreciate it.

PatAttack
08-28-2015, 01:41 PM
You have a great plan but I'd be cooking @ 275 for the cook.

smokingkettle
08-28-2015, 01:44 PM
You have a great plan but I'd be cooking @ 275 for the cook.

Yes, Franklin recommends 275. My newb self is scared of it finishing too early. Should I be? I know brisket isn't as forgiving as pork butt.

PatAttack
08-28-2015, 01:48 PM
No, cook it until it's probe tender in the thickest part of the flat.

After that, let it rest until it hits 145 then slice her up!

smokingkettle
08-28-2015, 01:50 PM
No, cook it until it's probe tender.

After that, let it rest until it hits 145 then slice her up!

Thanks.

PatAttack
08-28-2015, 02:06 PM
Cook @ 275 so you can get some extra sleep!:thumb:

The rest period "usually", takes a couple of hours.

cayenne
08-28-2015, 02:15 PM
I tend to like what I describe as a more TX flavor to my beef briskets.
That means mesquite!! I'd definitely add more wood to your WSM. I had one awhile back..and I'd throw multiple handfuls at a time in there to keep plenty of smoke going for all the time it would absorb smoke....and leave a nice, predominate ring when sliced into.

Again, I like strong flavors.....I live in the deep south.

But I'd at least do 50/50 on hickory and mesquite if I were you....

And add one more every 1.5-2 hours as needed....it sounded from your description you might be thinking of adding wood only at the beginning...with about 3 chunks? I may have misread tho....
:)

Anyway..good luck.

I'm not sure the Franklin method...I'll have to look that up. But I also like my brisket VERY tender and near fall apart. I cook mine to about 165F-170F...pull it off, seal in foil with some of my mop spritzed in there..and put back in to cook to 190F-200F or so.

Often my cooks will last till late at night and I'll usually take my briskets (and whatever else I have) out, keeping sealed in the foil, and stash in an igloo ice chest I keep just for food...and layer the meats in foil in with towels (old cooking towels)...and seal the lid up.

That will keep the meat hot for 8+ hours easily...so, I'll often time my cooks the night before to come off...put in ice chest...and be ready to go next day for lunch when I bring them out and cut into them...still nice and hot.

Anyway..good luck...I would (after this long diatribe) at the minimum advise more wood and make it more mesquite, at least 50/50 mix.

Post pics and keep us up to date as the cooking goes!!!

cayenne

Right on Q
08-28-2015, 02:20 PM
I cook butts and brisket at 250 on my WSM all the time but I have been known to crank it up to 275 on occasion.

The only difference in 250 and 275 is speed. As long as you are checking your meat you'll be fine.

Check for color, then wrap, then check for tenderness. That's always the process whether you cook at 225 or 350

landarc
08-28-2015, 02:24 PM
I think you have a fine plan, where I would do different.

1. To me (I am not from Texas, but, am a student of BBQ) I would drop the mesquite. It isn't the right wood for Texas BBQ. If at all possible, post oak and a little pecan is what I would do.

2. I would cook at 275F, in truth, the likelihood of something bad happening is higher at lower temperatures. I much prefer cooking 275 to 300 (my UDS runs very naturally well at 275F though). I would add here, that at 10 pounds, assuming 275F, I would estimate 45 minutes per pound, that's 7.5 to 8 hours cook time. At 250F, you are definitely looking at an hour per pound, maybe more.

3. Wrapping in parchment is not the same as wrapping in butcher paper. It is better than foil. Your bark will be softer than BP, but, firmer than Foil. That being said, I don't wrap if I don't have to. I watch color and texture.

4. I run water in all small cookers (be it kettle, WSM or UDS). I believe that not only does it aid in moderating temperatures, but, it aids in creating a moist cooking environment early in the cook that aids in creating bark as I prefer it. YMMV

Best of luck, and starting with a Prime packer is not wrong, especially at $3 a pound. Not wrong at all.

smokingkettle
08-28-2015, 02:45 PM
I tend to like what I describe as a more TX flavor to my beef briskets.
That means mesquite!! I'd definitely add more wood to your WSM. I had one awhile back..and I'd throw multiple handfuls at a time in there to keep plenty of smoke going for all the time it would absorb smoke....and leave a nice, predominate ring when sliced into.

Again, I like strong flavors.....I live in the deep south.

But I'd at least do 50/50 on hickory and mesquite if I were you....

And add one more every 1.5-2 hours as needed....it sounded from your description you might be thinking of adding wood only at the beginning...with about 3 chunks? I may have misread tho....
:)

Anyway..good luck.

I'm not sure the Franklin method...I'll have to look that up. But I also like my brisket VERY tender and near fall apart. I cook mine to about 165F-170F...pull it off, seal in foil with some of my mop spritzed in there..and put back in to cook to 190F-200F or so.

Often my cooks will last till late at night and I'll usually take my briskets (and whatever else I have) out, keeping sealed in the foil, and stash in an igloo ice chest I keep just for food...and layer the meats in foil in with towels (old cooking towels)...and seal the lid up.

That will keep the meat hot for 8+ hours easily...so, I'll often time my cooks the night before to come off...put in ice chest...and be ready to go next day for lunch when I bring them out and cut into them...still nice and hot.

Anyway..good luck...I would (after this long diatribe) at the minimum advise more wood and make it more mesquite, at least 50/50 mix.

Post pics and keep us up to date as the cooking goes!!!

cayenne


Yeah, I could add a bit more wood. I'm just afraid of over smoking. Especially from what I read about mesquite. I love a good smoke ring, and would like to introduce a good taste, but I don't want to over power.

Smoke on Badger Mountain
08-28-2015, 02:46 PM
Have fun!

smokingkettle
08-28-2015, 02:49 PM
I think you have a fine plan, where I would do different.

1. To me (I am not from Texas, but, am a student of BBQ) I would drop the mesquite. It isn't the right wood for Texas BBQ. If at all possible, post oak and a little pecan is what I would do.

2. I would cook at 275F, in truth, the likelihood of something bad happening is higher at lower temperatures. I much prefer cooking 275 to 300 (my UDS runs very naturally well at 275F though). I would add here, that at 10 pounds, assuming 275F, I would estimate 45 minutes per pound, that's 7.5 to 8 hours cook time. At 250F, you are definitely looking at an hour per pound, maybe more.

3. Wrapping in parchment is not the same as wrapping in butcher paper. It is better than foil. Your bark will be softer than BP, but, firmer than Foil. That being said, I don't wrap if I don't have to. I watch color and texture.

4. I run water in all small cookers (be it kettle, WSM or UDS). I believe that not only does it aid in moderating temperatures, but, it aids in creating a moist cooking environment early in the cook that aids in creating bark as I prefer it. YMMV

Best of luck, and starting with a Prime packer is not wrong, especially at $3 a pound. Not wrong at all.

I wanted to get post oak, but didn't have any at the time of my impulse buy. I realize I'm in Austin and could find some easily, but they are usually logs, not chunks and I don't have a mitre saw or anything to break it down. I ordered 15 lbs of post oak today from a place online. I will be trying that out next time. My in laws have a pecan farm on the San Saba river and are well-stocked on both pecan and mesquite wood and they have the tools to break it down. I'm going out there in a couple of weeks to bring home a huge score of smoking wood.

I didn't realize that there's a higher likelihood of issue at lower temperatures. That's good to know. I don't mind burning hotter.

Interesting information about parchment. I know butcher paper is all the rage right now, but I'm sure parchment paper can get me great results if I do everything right.

Good to know about the water thing. I see that lots of people run with and without water, so I'm not sure what I'm going to do there. If it regulates the temperature, I'm cool with water. I can hit 275 with water, just gotta open up the vents.

Thanks for the great advice, and yeah, $3 for prime was a good slap in the face.

hachi-roku_fan
08-28-2015, 02:51 PM
Ok now I have a question. Why the big flux in temp preference? Someone posted, let it cook to 145*, others to 200*. Is there any reasoning to this?

smokingkettle
08-28-2015, 02:52 PM
I cook butts and brisket at 250 on my WSM all the time but I have been known to crank it up to 275 on occasion.

The only difference in 250 and 275 is speed. As long as you are checking your meat you'll be fine.

Check for color, then wrap, then check for tenderness. That's always the process whether you cook at 225 or 350

Do you go with or without water in the pan?

landarc
08-28-2015, 02:53 PM
Ok now I have a question. Why the big flux in temp preference? Someone posted, let it cook to 145*, others to 200*. Is there any reasoning to this?


IMO, different methods, different cook temperatures, different cookers...all leads to a variety of ways to cook any one thing.

smokingkettle
08-28-2015, 02:53 PM
Ok now I have a question. Why the big flux in temp preference? Someone posted, let it cook to 145*, others to 200*. Is there any reasoning to this?

I think they are talking about temperatures at different stages. From what I've learned, you go to about 165, then wrap it. Then put it back on until it hits around 200 (should be nice and jiggly and ready to rest by then). That's when you pull it and let it rest.

landarc
08-28-2015, 02:56 PM
Cook it until probe tender, do not rely on internal temperature to pull the meat from the cooker. Using a steel probe (skewer, ice pick, thermo probe) probe the thickest part of the flat and look for a feel of sliding in very easily. Relying on internal temperature is much more difficult actually. Feel is harder until you've done a couple hundred briskets

smokingkettle
08-28-2015, 02:58 PM
Cook it until probe tender, do not rely on internal temperature to pull the meat from the cooker. Using a steel probe (skewer, ice pick, thermo probe) probe the thickest part of the flat and look for a feel of sliding in very easily. Relying on internal temperature is much more difficult actually. Feel is harder until you've done a couple hundred briskets

Despite the fact that I've never cooked a brisket, going by feel seems to make more sense to me than using a thermometer. I'm just going to use mine to monitor the inside temperature of my WSM. My reference to those temperatures is simply what I've read as a general guideline online. I'm actually not to keen about poking my brisket. I want every last bit of juice to stay in.

PatAttack
08-28-2015, 02:59 PM
Cook it until probe tender, do not rely on internal temperature to pull the meat from the cooker. Using a steel probe (skewer, ice pick, thermo probe) probe the thickest part of the flat and look for a feel of sliding in very easily. Relying on internal temperature is much more difficult actually. Feel is harder until you've done a couple hundred briskets

I've already covered that, Bob. Geez...:doh::laugh:

PatAttack
08-28-2015, 03:00 PM
Despite the fact that I've never cooked a brisket, going by feel seems to make more sense to me than using a thermometer. I'm just going to use mine to monitor the inside temperature of my WSM. My reference to those temperatures is simply what I've read as a general guideline online. I'm actually not to keen about poking my brisket. I want every last bit of juice to stay in.

Don't worry about losing any juices. It will be plenty juicy being a prime packer, I hope.

smokingkettle
08-28-2015, 03:02 PM
Don't worry about losing any juices. It will be plenty juicy being a prime packer, I hope.

Lol. Yeah. I feel good about it. I really appreciate everyone's advice.

Dale Nichols
08-28-2015, 03:02 PM
Ok now I have a question. Why the big flux in temp preference? Someone posted, let it cook to 145*, others to 200*. Is there any reasoning to this?

What Pat meant is after the brisket is done you can hold it in a cooler or something and let it cool down to 145 then then slice and serve. He knows what he is talking about.

Bludawg
08-28-2015, 04:00 PM
Your plan is solid but I would go for a minimum pit temp of 275. Spraying is totally unnecessary.

BluDawgs Brisket

K.I S.S. some of the best brisket you will ever eat! Total cook time including the rest 8 hrs or less. I promise it will be as moist as mornin dew on the lilly, tender as a mothers love, pure beefy smoky goodness.

1 packer 12-15 lb
Trim off the hard fat on each side of the flat thin the fat cap to 1/4"

Mix your Rub
1 part kosher salt 4 parts Med grind Black peppa by volume( this is a true 50/50 BY weight)
apply a coat of rub you need to be able to see the meat through the rub clearly.

Pre heat the pit to 300 deg
place brisket on the pit Fat Cap Down and point to the firebox unless it is a RF cooker then point to away from FB h

Maintain pit between 275-325 if cookin on a stick burner
cook Brisket 4 hrs
remove from pit wrap in a single layer of Butcher paper Return to pit Fat cap up.
after 1 hr probe the thicket part of the Flat only! If it isn't *probe tender it should be within 1 hr.
once it is probe tender remove from the pit keep it wrapped in the paper you cooked it in and allow it to rest on your counter until the Internal temp reaches 150 this will take about two hrs.
Don't ever slice more than you can eat big pieces retain moisture and won't dry up on you like slices will.
*PROBE TENDER>This is the feel that is mimicked by cutting room temperature butter with a hot knife, there should be no drag

scp
08-28-2015, 04:16 PM
Here is a question for you bludawg...if you are wanting to remove the point for burnt ends...I know you don't...but what if. Do you remove it before butcher paper is applied or cook it all the way and remove and rewrap for cool down?

PatAttack
08-28-2015, 10:07 PM
Here is a question for you bludawg...if you are wanting to remove the point for burnt ends...I know you don't...but what if. Do you remove it before butcher paper is applied or cook it all the way and remove and rewrap for cool down?

If you are doing this, seperate the point at 160.

Wrap the flat or not until it is probe tender.

The point, cube it up, put in a pan with your favorite sauce or rub and cook another hour to hour and a half. I think...this is "burnt ends"...??? Maybe.:wink:

scp
08-28-2015, 10:44 PM
If you are doing this, seperate the point at 160.

Wrap the flat or not until it is probe tender.

The point, cube it up, put in a pan with your favorite sauce or rub and cook another hour to hour and a half. I think...this is "burnt ends"...??? Maybe.:wink:

Yep...what I thought Pat...only I finish my BE different....separate...heavy on the rub...cook about two hours past the flat...cool a bit....cube and serve.

PatAttack
08-28-2015, 10:55 PM
Yep...what I thought Pat...only I finish my BE different....separate...heavy on the rub...cook about two hours past the flat...cool a bit....cube and serve.

Same thing...just...different.:thumb:

S.Six
08-29-2015, 02:49 AM
I like to run around 250-275. I also have been converted to no water in the pan. I'll cook it till its just a little bit tuff in the thickest part of the flat, usually 195 . then I'll foil it ( if its not already ) and let it set in a cooler for 2-3hrs. This works pretty well for me. good luck with your cook! Remember some pix!

smokingkettle
08-29-2015, 08:24 AM
I'm 3 and a half hours in and the temp is going between 265 and 280ish. Had some trouble stabilizing the temp for the first few hours (never realized how tossing an enormous hunk of meat on there could so heavily influence the temp). But I have had blue smoke for the last couple of hours so I should be good.

Bludawg
08-29-2015, 08:31 AM
Here is a question for you bludawg...if you are wanting to remove the point for burnt ends...I know you don't...but what if. Do you remove it before butcher paper is applied or cook it all the way and remove and rewrap for cool down?

I"d do it after the brisket has passed the poke to get as much mileage out of the time it's wrapped

smokingkettle
08-29-2015, 08:32 AM
So for you WSM users out there. What do you do to get the temperature stabilized? When I do spare ribs and butts I just toss half a chimney on there and it stabilizes and sticks right where I want it. I'm finding this to be more challenging. I filled it with unlit charcoal then put about 3/4 of a chimney on and it never went past 230. It was way too cool, so I opened the fire chamber and it shot up to like 340 in a mere few minutes. It took me another hour or so to stabilize it. Anyway. What should I do differently next time?

Bludawg
08-29-2015, 08:48 AM
Open all the intakes. Don't slap it together so soon leave the top off and let the steel warm up for 10- 15 min. Put the top on and start to close your intakes when you are with in 50 deg of your desired temp. give it time to react between adjustments typically 15 min. much easier to catch it on the way up. It gets easier with practice & experience, I set mine where I know it will give me what I'm looking for by instinct. Keep your wits and make small adj give it time to respond. Cookers are like wimen you need to tickle 'em just right warm 'em up slow once they get hot they go fer hrs.

bob3
08-29-2015, 08:51 AM
I'm a fan of using water in the pan for temp regulation. If you have the pan half full of hot water, and at least one chimney of hot coals, you're going to be around 275 with the vents open. I don't think you'd get hotter than 300, and if you do, partially closing the bottom vents will get you to where you want to be.

BBQ Train
08-29-2015, 09:24 AM
I want to cook a brisket on Labor Day on my UDS, I use a pizza pan to deflect the heat. Using Bludawg method should the brisket be fat side down at 275-300F or fat side up?

smokingkettle
08-29-2015, 10:24 AM
https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xlp1/v/t1.0-9/11951219_10153122236796989_451955968998158294_n.jp g?oh=c1df35aeb9d5160c5f35a6a0a4d87c29&oe=56783E65

Ok. Time to wrap? My gut is telling me to let a little more bark form. I'm 5 1/2 hours in.

pga7602
08-29-2015, 10:29 AM
Wow... nice pron. Please keep the pics coming

smokingkettle
08-29-2015, 10:30 AM
Wow... nice pron. Please keep the pics coming

Thanks. This is my first brisket, so I will chalk it up as a little bit of beginners luck coupled with great advice I'm getting on this site.

mikemci
08-29-2015, 10:30 AM
If it was mine, I'd be wrapping. She's a beaut!!

landarc
08-29-2015, 10:36 AM
I'd probably wrap at this point. Nice

smokingkettle
08-29-2015, 10:38 AM
Wrapped. I'm going by feel and not temperature. So I guess I just check it in about two hours and see if it's jiggly? If not, keep it going.

Bludawg
08-29-2015, 10:59 AM
I want to cook a brisket on Labor Day on my UDS, I use a pizza pan to deflect the heat. Using Bludawg method should the brisket be fat side down at 275-300F or fat side up?
Follow the fraking directions!

landarc
08-29-2015, 11:46 AM
Another 6 months and the Bludawg method won't be recognizable by Bludawg :shock:

smokingkettle
08-29-2015, 12:49 PM
Approaching hour 8. Quickly probed a couple spots. Read between 190 and 194 in the thicker part of the flat. BUT, did not go in like butter. It's getting a bit jiggly, but I think it still needs at least another hour.

Thoughts?

mikemci
08-29-2015, 02:03 PM
I'd start probing every 30 min. From now, until ready. You're almost there, won't be too much longer!

smokingkettle
08-29-2015, 02:18 PM
I would say that 70% of it is like butter and 30% is resisting. Still letting it go a little longer.

Bludawg
08-29-2015, 02:23 PM
Another 6 months and the Bludawg method won't be recognizable by Bludawg :shock:
buy 'em books send 'em to school and they eat the teacher:crazy:

mikemci
08-29-2015, 03:05 PM
You just need to probe the flat that is under the point. When that is tender, it's ready to put on the counter with the paper opened. Let it cool like that for 15-20 min. Close it back up and wrap in a towel and put it in an ice chest for 2-3 hrs. Ready to slice only what you are going to eat. Leave the rest intact to not lose moisture.

smokingkettle
08-29-2015, 03:13 PM
I pulled it. Will slice it up after resting. Fingers crossed.

Danny B
08-29-2015, 03:23 PM
FWIW I'm liking your timeline. I predict success. Good luck and post pics.

smokingkettle
08-29-2015, 04:38 PM
Ok. Overall, it turned out better than I thought it would. I'm pleased. Next time I will use slightly less salt as the bark was a tad on the salty side. Pepper was just right. There were a few spots in the flat where it got a little dryer than I wanted but overall was good throughout. The point was lovely. Pictures have been requested. So here they are.

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xap1/v/t1.0-9/10645292_10153122806611989_5737283444389962541_n.j pg?oh=49bc61a9b6b2d9e385396e79ca9a8842&oe=566718A6

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpf1/v/t1.0-9/11903894_10153122809386989_2759069464026797102_n.j pg?oh=43c82e235d7db04a9936cf10d0fb14e2&oe=56381C59

smokingkettle
08-29-2015, 05:08 PM
Posting more in a minute.

landarc
08-29-2015, 05:15 PM
Looks great, nice cooking

smokingkettle
08-29-2015, 05:16 PM
https://scontent-dfw1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xtp1/v/t1.0-9/11949283_10153122881721989_1926719933524819322_n.j pg?oh=e4a6c79f8f7ec45517228c0c6609d15e&oe=567BC77C

https://scontent-dfw1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xfp1/v/t1.0-9/11898888_10153122881796989_7650469939592751027_n.j pg?oh=d7c10eb39e9de7466b30008459a006d3&oe=566EB30A

https://scontent-dfw1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpf1/v/t1.0-9/11902512_10153122881791989_1675796450368320979_n.j pg?oh=23b8994c218007696ce80400572e794b&oe=566EAE06

https://scontent-dfw1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpl1/v/t1.0-9/11954628_10153122881801989_1194251475862419986_n.j pg?oh=84db65aecf1ba93d6362242af2542d10&oe=566C4BC8

https://scontent-dfw1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xfp1/v/t1.0-9/11904713_10153122881736989_8814236723499957742_n.j pg?oh=2a6dee280fee38d9d8bf92e29017ebb3&oe=5664FA0E

smokingkettle
08-29-2015, 05:18 PM
Looks great, nice cooking

Thanks. I've got a lot to learn.

mikemci
08-29-2015, 05:19 PM
She looks outstanding from here!:thumb: If it was too salty, you need to mix your salt/pepper ratio by weight, not volume. Great looking brisket there:clap2:

smokingkettle
08-29-2015, 05:27 PM
She looks outstanding from here!:thumb: If it was too salty, you need to mix your salt/pepper ratio by weight, not volume. Great looking brisket there:clap2:

You're 100% spot on. Next time it will be by weight.

Bludawg
08-29-2015, 05:33 PM
Sittin here sippin the same suds and wishing I had some of that point. Kosher salt is 3X heavier than pepper 1/3 c K salt to 2/3 c pepper if you don't have a scale

smokingkettle
08-29-2015, 05:43 PM
Sittin here sippin the same suds and wishing I had some of that point. Kosher salt is 3X heavier than pepper 1/3 c K salt to 2/3 c pepper if you don't have a scale

I realize that I'm just a beginner, but I did really well on the point. It was awesome. I'm taking notes on the salt. I used sea salt instead of kosher and at the wrong ratio. Live and learn. I'm the only person at the dinner table that seemed to notice the salt.

lankster35
08-29-2015, 05:47 PM
smokingkeetle: Can you tell me how much that weighed after trimming and how long your total cooking time was at what temp. I know you ca';t go by time alone and I just finished mine and I know it wasn't cooked all the way and you started about 5am and I started around 8am. Just trying to get a comparison.

smokingkettle
08-29-2015, 05:56 PM
smokingkeetle: Can you tell me how much that weighed after trimming and how long your total cooking time was at what temp. I know you ca';t go by time alone and I just finished mine and I know it wasn't cooked all the way and you started about 5am and I started around 8am. Just trying to get a comparison.

10lbs when I bought it. Trimmed off roughly a pound of fat.

Time BBQ F

4:15AM Started Chimney - HEB Grand Champion Lump
4:30AM Poured half chimney into full basket of unlit briquettes. Minion method.
4:45AM 196 Really thick smoke. 3 parts hickory. 1 part mesquite.
5:00AM 213 Put brisket on fat side down. Smoke settled down a bit.
5:30AM 230
Passed out for a little while
7:00AM 241 Son woke me up. Time for coffee. Noticed consistent blue smoke which lasted until I wrapped. It was too cold. Opened up fire door to kick it up a notch.
7:10AM 275
7:30AM 280
8:00AM 285
8:30AM 280
9:00AM 275
9:30AM 277
10:00AM 282 Starting to get mahogany-colored
10:30AM 277 Wrapped in parchment paper
11:00AM 275
11:30AM 275
12:00PM 277
12:30PM 277 Checked internals just to see my ballpark temperature. Was around 190ish. Started probing for tenderness.
1:00PM 275
1:30PM 275 Probed but still had some resistance in certain spots.
2:00PM 277
2:30PM Almost entirely tender throughout. Pulled and put in cooler
4:00PM Served

Notes: Didn't have the right size parchment paper. Going to get butcher paper next time. I'm going to try post oak next time just to try it. Going to mix the salt on weight instead of volume next time. I am going to get up to temperature quicker next time by leaving the fire door open early and pull back a little before I get there.

PatAttack
08-29-2015, 06:04 PM
Hey, looks like you don't need our help anymore.

Nailed it!:clap:

Bludawg
08-29-2015, 06:07 PM
:twitch:TMI

bbqwizard
08-29-2015, 07:37 PM
buy 'em books send 'em to school and they eat the teacher:crazy:

I AM a chef instructor at a high risk comprehensive high school. You sir are not far off there:shock:

landarc
08-29-2015, 07:56 PM
I agree with mixing by weight if at all possible. I'm a huge fan of kosher salt for rubs.

smokingkettle
08-29-2015, 08:12 PM
:twitch:TMI

I was bored and had My laptop around. Just opened Excel and took notes of what was happening every half hour. Just hit copy and paste for the most part. I can go back and look at what I can do differently next time.

smokingkettle
08-29-2015, 08:13 PM
Hey, looks like you don't need our help anymore.

Nailed it!:clap:

Thanks

lankster35
08-29-2015, 09:20 PM
as I thought. You went almost 2 total hours longer than me at about the same temp and then help in the cooler longer. Mine clearly could have gone longer. next time.

I know time is not how to tell it is done so no need to comment but it is one point to compare as we had the same size brisket and cooked at the same temp. I pulled too soon.

jemezspring
08-29-2015, 09:24 PM
Looks great to me. The only changes I would make as said above would be to up the pepper ratio. I like 4-5 parts coarse black pepper to 1 part kosher salt. It may sound like a lot of pepper but the spiciness of the pepper cooks off and leaves a nice crust. I would also up the temp to 300 but just for time sake. You're off to a great start in your brisket making future. Don't make too many drastic changes in your technique so that you know what works and what does not. $3/lb aint bad at all. Down your way you might be able to find it even cheaper if you keep your eyes open in the sales papers. Not prime but still good practice.

smokingkettle
08-29-2015, 09:31 PM
Looks great to me. The only changes I would make as said above would be to up the pepper ratio. I like 4-5 parts coarse black pepper to 1 part kosher salt. It may sound like a lot of pepper but the spiciness of the pepper cooks off and leaves a nice crust. I would also up the temp to 300 but just for time sake. You're off to a great start in your brisket making future. Don't make too many drastic changes in your technique so that you know what works and what does not. $3/lb aint bad at all. Down your way you might be able to find it even cheaper if you keep your eyes open in the sales papers. Not prime but still good practice.

I agree. I really liked the pepper. I wouldn't complain if I had to put more on there. I do think that the higher temperature would have made a positive difference. Thanks for the advice.

smokingkettle
08-29-2015, 09:33 PM
as I thought. You went almost 2 total hours longer than me at about the same temp and then help in the cooler longer. Mine clearly could have gone longer. next time.

I know time is not how to tell it is done so no need to comment but it is one point to compare as we had the same size brisket and cooked at the same temp. I pulled too soon.

I just checked out your brisket in your thread. Doesn't look bad at all. Great smoke ring. I'd eat it. My biggest takeaway from my cook is that I am walking away with a better feel of what I need to do next time.

pjtexas1
08-29-2015, 10:15 PM
nicely done! i would call that a win.

smokingkettle
08-30-2015, 12:29 PM
nicely done! i would call that a win.

Thanks. I had leftovers for lunch today. Still good.

landarc
08-30-2015, 01:52 PM
I'll just note, a lot of the pepper/salt ratio variables you read about could come down to how you measure. A 4:1 ratio of kosher salt to medium grind black pepper by volume is the same as a 1:1 ratio of kosher salt to medium grind black pepper by weight.

smokingkettle
08-30-2015, 02:14 PM
I'll just note, a lot of the pepper/salt ratio variables you read about could come down to how you measure. A 4:1 ratio of kosher salt to medium grind black pepper by volume is the same as a 1:1 ratio of kosher salt to medium grind black pepper by weight.

That's good to know. Thanks

landarc
08-30-2015, 02:21 PM
I mean, rereading that, 4 parts black pepper to 1 part kosher salt by volume. I gotta proofread more