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OakeyBBQ
08-27-2015, 10:46 AM
Ok. I have been looking to get post oak wood shipped to Iowa for months. I would like to replicate Texas style barbecue in the midwest and have been practicing for months and hope to open up a small trailer within the next couple of years. A seasonal thing since I doubt people would want to eat outside in the middle of December in Iowa. I have asked on other forums and have had little help. So, does anyone know of any business besides fruita wood chunks that could send post oak wood to Iowa in bulk on a regular basis? Either from Texas or anywhere else? Hill Country BBQ in New York gets post oak trucked to them from Texas. I asked where they got it from but they never got back to me. Also, would white oak work just the same? I have looked into white oak but wasn't sure if it would taste the same and the local craigslist people here said they don't organize their wood and it is just random varieties of oak and I would like a reliable source. Any help would be great!

cseymour45
08-27-2015, 11:26 AM
I grew up in Iowa and have only recently lived in Texas for 6 years. My dad and I always used Oak in Iowa (white or red), I highly doubt your customers would ever be able to tell any difference. I would probably fail in a blind fold test and I have used both for years. I don't think it's worth the time in shipping for you to try and get post oak from TX. Find some farmer or anyone with land and seasoned oaks, get you a saw and cut up your own. Save some serious cash. Your Texas style is going to come from only burning wood, seasoning used and sauce styles IMO.

OakeyBBQ
08-27-2015, 11:33 AM
I grew up in Iowa and have only recently lived in Texas for 6 years. My dad and I always used Oak in Iowa (white or red), I highly doubt your customers would ever be able to tell any difference. I would probably fail in a blind fold test and I have used both for years. I don't think it's worth the time in shipping for you to try and get post oak from TX. Find some farmer or anyone with land and seasoned oaks, get you a saw and cut up your own. Save some serious cash. Your Texas style is going to come from only burning wood, seasoning used and sauce styles IMO.

Thanks for your response. I was thinking it would be difficult to tell the difference for the vast majority of people. Myself included.

RolandJT
08-27-2015, 11:43 AM
I agree--TX barbecue uses post oak because it is there.

Use other oaks, hickory, or maple which we have plenty of. The other oaks should be similar in flavor.

Hickory maple mix has a more pronounced flavor, but you may even liek it more. I use maple and hickory 50-50 for deer and really like it.

chingador
08-27-2015, 11:57 AM
I read somewhere before that white oak is the closest thing to post oak fwiw

churrodog
08-27-2015, 12:00 PM
Just saw this today. No clue if they could facilitate something for you or not.

http://www.woodchuckdelivery.com/

OakeyBBQ
08-27-2015, 12:16 PM
Just saw this today. No clue if they could facilitate something for you or not.

http://www.woodchuckdelivery.com/

Thanks for the link. It looks like they only deliver in the Austin area.

Smokin J's PIts
08-27-2015, 12:18 PM
http://www.westernbbqproducts.com/
try these guys out

krex1010
08-27-2015, 12:21 PM
Post oak is in the white oak family, any oak tree with rounded lobes on the leaves is in the white oak family and will give similar smoke flavor, beech is related to white oak as well and gives a similar flavor. I have an aversion to paying for wood for cooking, there's usually free wood available if you're open to sticking to local species.

cheez59
08-27-2015, 12:33 PM
Post oak=white oak=post oak as far as cooking is concerned.

SmokeŽ
08-27-2015, 12:42 PM
I would use white oak and not look back. Even post oak grown in different type soils will have different flavors.

sliding_billy
08-27-2015, 01:14 PM
Just to throw another wrinkle at you... Depending on who you ask about "authentic" Texas BBQ wood, you might get different answers. Post oak, mesquite and pecan are all used regularly depending on availability. I actually use a combination of the three for most cooks, but use only pecan the most when I use a single wood. My advice is to cook with what is available and compare the taste with other woods that you might have shipped in for samples. I think that you will find that the meat prep and cooking method/temps are more important than the type of wood. As mentioned before, post is a subset of the white oak family. The difference is more about how it burns than how it tastes in my experience. It is harder than other whites, so it can burn longer. It can also smolder more if not burned hot enough causing an acrid flavor. Best of luck to you whichever way you go.

Cayman1
08-27-2015, 01:15 PM
Contact some local tree trimming companies and let them know what you are interested in. Most just mulch what they cut.

You could be like me, looking for pecan in a prt of the country that doesn't have pecan but tons of everything else.

krex1010
08-27-2015, 02:39 PM
With some basic knowledge on your local trees combined with a small bow saw in your vehicle, you'll never have to buy smoke wood again.

Bludawg
08-27-2015, 03:49 PM
Use local sourced Oak it's an "only your hairdresser will know" situation and keep you overhead low.:thumb: FIW you can't make real TX BBQ anywhere but TX.:wink:

jimithing78
08-27-2015, 04:48 PM
Wood is pretty heavy. I think it would be very expensive to have it shipped to you. I'll PM you where I get my Post Oak but I'm not sure he'd be willing to ship.

Regular white oak is close but it's not quite the same. I've never tried oak from Iowa so it may be a totally different species and taste different than the white oak here.

pbj
08-27-2015, 07:09 PM
According to wikipedia, you can find post oak in Iowa. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercus_stellata

chingador
08-27-2015, 08:33 PM
Just to throw another wrinkle at you... Depending on who you ask about "authentic" Texas BBQ wood, you might get different answers. Post oak, mesquite and pecan are all used regularly depending on availability. I actually use a combination of the three for most cooks, but use only pecan the most when I use a single wood. My advice is to cook with what is available and compare the taste with other woods that you might have shipped in for samples. I think that you will find that the meat prep and cooking method/temps are more important than the type of wood. As mentioned before, post is a subset of the white oak family. The difference is more about how it burns than how it tastes in my experience. It is harder than other whites, so it can burn longer. It can also smolder more if not burned hot enough causing an acrid flavor. Best of luck to you whichever way you go.

Absolutely. Central Texas is post oak. East central through near coastal bend you see a lot of pecan, north, west and south a lot of mesquite. In the east Texas piney woods you will see mostly hickory.