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Bob C Cue
08-07-2015, 11:20 AM
I know everyone seems to agree that your brisket is done when it is probe tender in the thickest part of the flat. Question: If you are planning on resting it in a cooler for 2 or more hours before serving, would you still want to cook it until probe tender since the brisket will be continue to "cook" while resting. Would it be better to pull it off at a certain temperature knowing that you will have some care over? Thanks!

SmittyJonz
08-07-2015, 11:30 AM
Probe tender then tent it for 20 minutes then cooler it.

daninnewjersey
08-07-2015, 11:45 AM
Probe tender then tent it for 20 minutes then cooler it.

Exactly. If you pull it at probe tender then let it cool a bit you'll stop the cooking. The brisket will continue to stay warm while you hold it...

Bob C Cue
08-07-2015, 11:47 AM
Thanks very much guys for your quick response. Makes sense and I am sure it has been covered several times on this site but was having trouble finding it.

biggiefries19
08-07-2015, 12:27 PM
I know everyone seems to agree that your brisket is done when it is probe tender in the thickest part of the flat. Question: If you are planning on resting it in a cooler for 2 or more hours before serving, would you still want to cook it until probe tender since the brisket will be continue to "cook" while resting. Would it be better to pull it off at a certain temperature knowing that you will have some care over? Thanks!

This is one thing I learned over time. When I cook a brisket, I do cook it to tenderness. The internal temp could be 195-205, it doesn't matter it has to feel right. What I do is then of course is pull it off the smoker and if it's one I have wrapped during the smoke I will vent some of the heat and let it cool for a few minutes before I wrap it back up and rest it in a cooler. This stops the brisket from cooking while you have it wrapped and stuck in a cooler, and instead starts it slow cool down to draw back in that moisture it's sweating out. Hope that helps.

Fwismoker
08-07-2015, 12:47 PM
I thought the PBC had specific instructions? Anyways carryover cooking isn't going to hurt anything or contribute to over cooking pulling it at probe tender if you let it cool down loosely tenting like smitty suggested.

Different briskets will probe tender at different temps anyway so there would never be a specific temp to pull at even if you wanted. Hope that makes sense.

Demosthenes9
08-07-2015, 01:03 PM
have to be kind of careful with this. As long as the brisket is above 140 degrees, it's still "cooking" and still breaking down the connective tissue. What slows as the temp decreases is the rate of breakdown.

You vent the brisket to halt the upward path of the internal temp. I.e. if you pull the brisket at 200 and wrap and cooler it immediately, the temp will continue to rise for a while, perhaps hitting 205 or more and then it will slowly start to fall. Venting puts a stop to that and the IT starts to fall. BUT, say it drops from 200 down to 195, then you wrap and put it in a well insulated cooler. That brisket will indeed continue to cook and the connective tissues will continue to break down as it makes it's way from 195 down to 140 over the next X many hours.

There's a "window" for when brisket is done. If you catch it near the beginning of the window, pull, vent and cooler it for a couple of hours, hopefully it will still be within that window. If you pull the brisket at/near the end of said window, vent and cooler for a couple of hours, it very well might overcook on you and fall apart.

Bob C Cue
08-07-2015, 01:12 PM
have to be kind of careful with this. As long as the brisket is above 140 degrees, it's still "cooking" and still breaking down the connective tissue. What slows as the temp decreases is the rate of breakdown.

You vent the brisket to halt the upward path of the internal temp. I.e. if you pull the brisket at 200 and wrap and cooler it immediately, the temp will continue to rise for a while, perhaps hitting 205 or more and then it will slowly start to fall. Venting puts a stop to that and the IT starts to fall. BUT, say it drops from 200 down to 195, then you wrap and put it in a well insulated cooler. That brisket will indeed continue to cook and the connective tissues will continue to break down as it makes it's way from 195 down to 140 over the next X many hours.

There's a "window" for when brisket is done. If you catch it near the beginning of the window, pull, vent and cooler it for a couple of hours, hopefully it will still be within that window. If you pull the brisket at/near the end of said window, vent and cooler for a couple of hours, it very well might overcook on you and fall apart.
Thanks for the further clarification. As with so many things' looks like timing is key.

arbeck
08-07-2015, 01:25 PM
have to be kind of careful with this. As long as the brisket is above 140 degrees, it's still "cooking" and still breaking down the connective tissue. What slows as the temp decreases is the rate of breakdown.

You vent the brisket to halt the upward path of the internal temp. I.e. if you pull the brisket at 200 and wrap and cooler it immediately, the temp will continue to rise for a while, perhaps hitting 205 or more and then it will slowly start to fall. Venting puts a stop to that and the IT starts to fall. BUT, say it drops from 200 down to 195, then you wrap and put it in a well insulated cooler. That brisket will indeed continue to cook and the connective tissues will continue to break down as it makes it's way from 195 down to 140 over the next X many hours.

There's a "window" for when brisket is done. If you catch it near the beginning of the window, pull, vent and cooler it for a couple of hours, hopefully it will still be within that window. If you pull the brisket at/near the end of said window, vent and cooler for a couple of hours, it very well might overcook on you and fall apart.

This is true. Collagen is going to render out into gelatin anywhere from 140-212F. It's most efficient in the range of 160-180. You can actually make a tender brisket even at 140F just by cooking a very long time (try 72 hours sous vide). So, if you get it perfectly tender at 195, it's still going to render out until it drops below 140. If you have a preheated cooler, I'd probably try to wait until the temp gets down close to 160 before I coolered it.