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bbq.tom
03-12-2015, 09:17 AM
The Benefits of Flour forwarded to me.

Since burns are almost likely with our hobby/addiction I thought this might be beneficial. I’ve not tried this yet (as I just received it today), but plan on trying it on my next burn.

Some time ago I was cooking some corn and stuck my fork in the boiling water to see if the corn was ready. I missed and my hand went into the boiling water....!!
A friend of mine, who was a Vietnam vet, came into the house, as I was screaming, & asked me if I had some plain old flour...
I pulled out a bag and he stuck my hand in it. He told me to keep my hand in the flour for 10 minutes.
He said, In Vietnam , there was a guy on fire and in their panic, they threw a bag of flour all over him to put the fire out...Well, it not only put the fire out, but he never even had a blister!!!!
... Long story short, I put my hand in the bag of flour for 10 mins, pulled it out and did not even have a red mark or a blister & absolutely NO PAIN.
Now, I keep a bag of flour in the fridge and every time I burn myself. *Cold flour feels even better than room temperature flour.
I use the flour and have never ever had even a red spot/burn mark, or a blister!
I even burnt my tongue once, put the flour on it for about 10 minutes .... the pain was gone and no burn.

Try it . . . Experience a miracle!
Keep a bag of flour in your fridge and you will be happy you did!
Flour has heat absorbent property and also is strong antioxidant property. Thus helps in burns patient if applied within 15 minutes.

“When someone shares something of value with you and you benefit from it, you have a moral obligation to share it with others"

code3rrt
03-12-2015, 09:22 AM
Thanks Tom, Just may have to give it a try.

KC

dadsr4
03-12-2015, 09:22 AM
It would cool the affected area. Good to know if flour is closer than cold water.

rookiedad
03-12-2015, 09:49 AM
did you ever try to make a paste with some water and apply it that way? i wonder if it would have the same effect.

food4thot
03-12-2015, 09:53 AM
Never tried flour but I know egg white is good on burns

NickTheGreat
03-12-2015, 09:57 AM
Doesn't make sense to me one bit. But I suppose it's worth a shot?

Skip
03-12-2015, 10:05 AM
I work with extreme temperatures and have burned myself on occasion. I learned long ago that heat doesn't necessary burn you. Time (exposure) does. I have found the best way to assure minimal damage is to cool the area quickly. I think possibly this is what the flour will do. I, myself, have found that water is your best option. The quicker you can get it under water the quicker the heat will dissipate. I had a waiter foolishly place a cup of coffee down in front of my daughter who was in a highchair. She was under 2. As soon as it hit the table she grab the rim and pulled the whole cup of coffee down on herself. Well my experiences with both high temperatures and knowing I had been a child burned by hot coffee myself I leaped up and grabbed every glass of clear liquid on the table and doused her in them. She was screaming yes....but not a burn nor red mark nor blister. Not even on the hands that had grabbed the rim and dumped the liquid. I say clear liquid as my son had ordered a sprite and thinking it was water it went on her too. I am glad you found a remedy that works for you. I may try it but I am so hardwired to get into water I wonder if I could deviate from it.

Schmoke
03-12-2015, 10:09 AM
This is why forwarded stories go on and on forever.

'Just may have to give it a try!'
'You never know!'
'I suppose it's worth a shot?'

How about this: No! Flour doesn't work like that!

http://www.snopes.com/medical/homecure/flourburns.asp

insaneh
03-12-2015, 10:17 AM
I've tried water and flour. The flour worked.
Scalding hot cream cheese across my hand.
I stuck it in a bowl of flour and all it did was turn red. No blisters at all.

Ol'Joe
03-12-2015, 10:40 AM
Never heard of the flour story before, I'll just stick with the cool water, and trying to not get burned in the first place.

smoke ninja
03-12-2015, 12:37 PM
This is why forwarded stories go on and on forever.

'Just may have to give it a try!'
'You never know!'
'I suppose it's worth a shot?'

How about this: No! Flour doesn't work like that!

http://www.snopes.com/medical/homecure/flourburns.asp


While i cant discount the scientific validity of snopes nor have i ever heard of flour as burn treatment i would not discount it based on their comments. i doubt they burned people then treated some with flour, some with water and some untreated as a control.

Skip
03-12-2015, 12:54 PM
I think a big part of the original story is the nature of flour as a dust. As it disperses around the fire it will work like a number of fire suppression devices. It will cut off the oxygen enough to snuff the flames. The reason the person didn't blister or burn could have been a combination of the flour and their quick reaction. If it was a fuel it may not have burned long enough to create the damaging heat on the skin and the flour broadcast over him would work like an overhead fire suppression system.

Working with heat I have grown accustom to what my threshold is for pain to damage. I experience pain on a regular basis. Brief and localized and probably first degree at times. People tell me I have "created" a tolerance to heat. That somehow I can withstand heat better due to my years of exposure. I giggle at the idea but it is an expected conclusion when I will retrieve baked potatoes from the oven barehanded and put them on someones plate. Only to have them try to prep the potato and scream in pain from the heat. What it is actually is an intimate knowledge of my threshold. I know the point I can go to without causing myself any long term damage but still well beyond the "Ouch" factor for those who do not work with heat. Some try to tell me its calloused hands but that isn't the case. Callous builds due to use and friction. We don't lay on extra skin due to heat exposure. Most people react to a slight burn in the same manner as they do to a severe burn. They scream and yell and possibly wave the affected area wildly to deal with the pain. Many times it will then end up in water or your mouth to cool it. Now think back on how many of those instances resulted in a slightly reddened skin and nothing more. Anything thats cool will give relief in that situation.
That being said i will not discount this as a remedy but I if it is not then I think this explains why it seems to work.

insaneh
03-12-2015, 04:33 PM
I was skeptical also. If I hadn't seen it and felt it for myself, I wouldn't have believed it.
There are variables at work though.
1)I have no idea what temp the cream cheese was.
It was stuffed into jalapeno's and like an idiot, I was carrying it back to the kitchen from the deck with just tongs. It slipped and I tried to catch it. They were in the BGE for about a half hour at 300 deg. All I can tell you is , it was hot. I'm a machinist and hot metal chips land on my skin on a regular basis. Maybe not Skips temps, but I have good feel for what hot is.
2)I keep my flour in the freezer. That may have been the true cause for the success. I have tried cold water and I always seem to blister.

I seem to have learned my lesson and (knock on wood) haven't got burnt lately.
Except for the wood stove and that's always on my arm which is hard to keep flour on and nowhere near a fridge or a tap.

mchar69
03-12-2015, 05:57 PM
Ice, Ice, baby. Works every time.

Pitbull
03-12-2015, 05:58 PM
A couple of other things to think about. If its a grease burn maybe the flour pulls the grease off of and out of the skin. And also, maybe the gluten has some medicinal affect. Don't know, but maybe..

tish
03-12-2015, 06:05 PM
I don't know about keeping a burn from blistering by putting the burned appendage in flour because I've never tried it. If the OP says he's tried it and it works, that's good enough for me. I'd try it. But I was really surprised to read about the flaming vet being saved by having been doused with flour.

Flinging flour around in the air makes flour 'dust', which can be explosive, as can any carbohydrate 'dust'. I've been repeatedly cautioned not to use flour to extinguish a fire in place of baking soda for that very reason. I've been told the resulting blast can be one of such force as to actually kill a person.

I copied and pasted the following text from the "How Stuff Works" website to illustrate the principles behind the phenomenon. Please read, as it could save you or your loved ones from catastrophic injury.

White flour is made up mostly of starch. If you have read the article How Food Works, you know that starch is a carbohydrate, meaning that it is made of sugar molecules chained together. Anyone who has ever lit a marshmallow on fire knows that sugar burns easily. So does flour.

Flour and many other carbohydrates become explosive when they are hanging in the air as dust. It only takes 1 or 2 grams of dust per cubic foot of air (50 or so grams per cubic meter) for the mixture to be ignitable. Flour grains are so tiny that they burn instantly. When one grain burns, it lights other grains near it, and the flame front can flash through a dust cloud with explosive force. Just about any carbohydrate dust, including sugar, pudding mix, fine sawdust, etc., will explode once ignited.

When you hear about an explosion in a grain elevator on the news, this is what has occurred. A spark or a source of heat ignited the dust in the air and it exploded.

cb25
03-12-2015, 06:38 PM
Flinging flour around in the air makes flour 'dust', which can be explosive, as can any carbohydrate 'dust'. I've been repeatedly cautioned not to use flour to extinguish a fire in place of baking soda for that very reason. I've been told the resulting blast can be one of such force as to actually kill a person.

I copied and pasted the following text from the "How Stuff Works" website to illustrate the principles behind the phenomenon. Please read, as it could save you or your loved ones from catastrophic injury.

White flour is made up mostly of starch. If you have read the article How Food Works, you know that starch is a carbohydrate, meaning that it is made of sugar molecules chained together. Anyone who has ever lit a marshmallow on fire knows that sugar burns easily. So does flour.

Flour and many other carbohydrates become explosive when they are hanging in the air as dust. It only takes 1 or 2 grams of dust per cubic foot of air (50 or so grams per cubic meter) for the mixture to be ignitable. Flour grains are so tiny that they burn instantly. When one grain burns, it lights other grains near it, and the flame front can flash through a dust cloud with explosive force. Just about any carbohydrate dust, including sugar, pudding mix, fine sawdust, etc., will explode once ignited.

When you hear about an explosion in a grain elevator on the news, this is what has occurred. A spark or a source of heat ignited the dust in the air and it exploded.


This was my thought as well. Ask my father in law about his experience target shooting in the desert. They had sacks of flour that they were using to hold targets because they thought it would make a big puff of white dust when they hit it.

First shot (with their new .50 Barrett) from a few hundred yards out lit the dang thing up and spread fire into the air and across the desert. The way he tells it, they all (5-6 of them) sprinted out 300yds to put out the fire before it could turn ugly.

That was the day he learned flour could be flammable. Funny as hell to hear him tell the story though.

chuMP
03-12-2015, 07:07 PM
I'm not discounting the method, I just don't see how flour could cool a hot spot as quickly as cool liquid. I would thing that the ability of h2o to transfer thermal energy would be far greater than that of flour. Moving water would absorb and transfer the heat away very rapidly. Flour may absorb the heat quickly, but I don't think that it would carry it away nearly as fast since it would not flow away(presumably). I'm not a thermodynamicist, just using a little logic(maybe flawed logic though...:idea:)

smoke ninja
03-12-2015, 07:49 PM
I don't know about keeping a burn from blistering by putting the burned appendage in flour because I've never tried it. If the OP says he's tried it and it works, that's good enough for me. I'd try it. But I was really surprised to read about the flaming vet being saved by having been doused with flour.

Flinging flour around in the air makes flour 'dust', which can be explosive, as can any carbohydrate 'dust'. I've been repeatedly cautioned not to use flour to extinguish a fire in place of baking soda for that very reason. I've been told the resulting blast can be one of such force as to actually kill a person.

I copied and pasted the following text from the "How Stuff Works" website to illustrate the principles behind the phenomenon. Please read, as it could save you or your loved ones from catastrophic injury.

White flour is made up mostly of starch. If you have read the article How Food Works, you know that starch is a carbohydrate, meaning that it is made of sugar molecules chained together. Anyone who has ever lit a marshmallow on fire knows that sugar burns easily. So does flour.

Flour and many other carbohydrates become explosive when they are hanging in the air as dust. It only takes 1 or 2 grams of dust per cubic foot of air (50 or so grams per cubic meter) for the mixture to be ignitable. Flour grains are so tiny that they burn instantly. When one grain burns, it lights other grains near it, and the flame front can flash through a dust cloud with explosive force. Just about any carbohydrate dust, including sugar, pudding mix, fine sawdust, etc., will explode once ignited.

When you hear about an explosion in a grain elevator on the news, this is what has occurred. A spark or a source of heat ignited the dust in the air and it exploded.



Powdered non dairy coffee creamer has the same flammable properties.

dadsr4
03-12-2015, 08:00 PM
Powdered non dairy coffee creamer has the same flammable properties.
Mythbusters - Creamer Cannon - YouTube

tish
03-12-2015, 08:05 PM
Powdered non dairy coffee creamer has the same flammable properties.

Steve, I didn't know this stuff was flammable, too. I looked it up, and boy were you right!

https://youtu.be/yRw4ZRqmxOc

tish
03-12-2015, 08:06 PM
Omg! :laugh: Thanks, Bill! Great minds think alike! :thumb:

snapper-G
03-13-2015, 10:08 AM
I've been working in commercial and institutional kitchens for 30 years and I never heard that. I do know, as previously mentioned, that flour thrown on flames will combust. Not a great idea. I'll stick to cold water.

Skip
03-13-2015, 10:49 AM
Ice, Ice, baby. Works every time.

As someone who experiences burns I would discourage this. The extreme temperature change can cause damage as well. Flowing water will wick away heat quickly enough. The ice will cause the portion of the burn that can recover to die off due to a rapid constriction of the capillary beds. Since the area is damaged this constriction will normally lead to necrosis and a dying off of tissue you could have saved.

dano
03-13-2015, 10:53 AM
Very cool story, as well as a tip!

Skip
03-13-2015, 10:57 AM
I don't know about keeping a burn from blistering by putting the burned appendage in flour because I've never tried it. If the OP says he's tried it and it works, that's good enough for me. I'd try it. But I was really surprised to read about the flaming vet being saved by having been doused with flour.

Flinging flour around in the air makes flour 'dust', which can be explosive, as can any carbohydrate 'dust'. I've been repeatedly cautioned not to use flour to extinguish a fire in place of baking soda for that very reason. I've been told the resulting blast can be one of such force as to actually kill a person.

I copied and pasted the following text from the "How Stuff Works" website to illustrate the principles behind the phenomenon. Please read, as it could save you or your loved ones from catastrophic injury.

White flour is made up mostly of starch. If you have read the article How Food Works, you know that starch is a carbohydrate, meaning that it is made of sugar molecules chained together. Anyone who has ever lit a marshmallow on fire knows that sugar burns easily. So does flour.

Flour and many other carbohydrates become explosive when they are hanging in the air as dust. It only takes 1 or 2 grams of dust per cubic foot of air (50 or so grams per cubic meter) for the mixture to be ignitable. Flour grains are so tiny that they burn instantly. When one grain burns, it lights other grains near it, and the flame front can flash through a dust cloud with explosive force. Just about any carbohydrate dust, including sugar, pudding mix, fine sawdust, etc., will explode once ignited.

When you hear about an explosion in a grain elevator on the news, this is what has occurred. A spark or a source of heat ignited the dust in the air and it exploded.

I had a chemistry teacher who kept a live bunsen burner on his desk with a pile of dust next to it. Whenever he saw someone sleeping he would throw a handful into the flame. The ensuing flash would wake anyone up. But the explosion comes when there is a restriction. Something needs to hold back the reaction to create pressure. If left to the open air it will just flash off. But I agree with your premise. How did the flour not flash. Quite possibly it had enough moisture in it to suppress the flash off or they dumped it directly on him and didn't broadcast it into the air to get oxygen around it.

Bludawg
03-13-2015, 11:07 AM
Thanks!! I'll keep that in my back pocket. Burn and Wound treatment /management can be a life saver I keep a jar of Sugardyne for such emergencies It's old science that is extremely effective. Good read on it and the formula to make it ( no need to be a Pharmaceutical engineer). I've used it with great success for years. http://www.naturalnews.com/026812_sugar_antibiotic_honey.html#
to make a Batch mix 3 parts Powdered sugar with 1 part Oilve oil put iti in a sterile jar with a lid keeps forever

tish
03-13-2015, 02:53 PM
Thanks!! I'll keep that in my back pocket. Burn and Wound treatment /management can be a life saver I keep a jar of Sugardyne for such emergencies It's old science that is extremely effective. Good read on it and the formula to make it ( no need to be a Pharmaceutical engineer). I've used it with great success for years. http://www.naturalnews.com/026812_sugar_antibiotic_honey.html#
to make a Batch mix 3 parts Powdered sugar with 1 part Oilve oil put iti in a sterile jar with a lid keeps forever

I know that honey was used in ancient Egypt to cure wounds, but I didn't realize it was still being used. This article was fascinating. I'm going to research this further. Thanks for posting, brother! :thumb:

Bludawg
03-13-2015, 03:12 PM
It has to be raw honey

TonyT
03-13-2015, 03:44 PM
In my experience, flowing water is the best. Even better than ice.

1buckie
03-13-2015, 03:47 PM
Good ideas all around......I'm prepared if they happen to fail.....1959 printing, but still useful.....

http://i1223.photobucket.com/albums/dd520/1buckie/Mid%20June%202012%20TriTip/MidJune2012TriTip001.jpg

Bludawg
03-13-2015, 03:55 PM
I liberated a copy of that and have read it several times in the last 30 yrs, I memorized the chapter on Emergency Brian Surgery just in case hey ya never know.....:biggrin1:

1buckie
03-13-2015, 05:57 PM
Yep, never know when ya might have to fix your BRIAN......:thumb:

Skip
03-13-2015, 09:57 PM
Doctor! My brain HURTS!