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View Full Version : Deer Jerky Marinade.


FatDaddy
08-16-2006, 09:06 PM
Ive got quite a bit of deer left in the freezer and i wanna turn it into jerky. Does anyone have a good marinade for deer jerky that they are willing to share?
If i can find the one i used previously ill post it, but the Fiances parents maid threw it away last christmas before i ever got to make jerky while i was down there.

dodgeramsst2003
08-16-2006, 09:21 PM
I've had the best luck with the store bought dry cures. I usually go to gander mountain or cabelas and pick some up. you just rub it on, leave them for 24 - 36 hours in a bag and then smoke. Just my personal preference. I've tried others recipes, and most of the time they are just a a seasoning, no curing salt equals no curing. Just my 2 cents worth.

Chris

boatnut
08-17-2006, 12:00 PM
Here's my magical recipe for beef jerky. I've used it on venison with great results as well.

4lbs meat
1/2 cup soy ( i use the "lite")
1/2 cup worteschire sauce
1 tablespoon liquid smoke (optional naturally if smoking it!)
1 teaspoon tabasco
1 tablespoon A-1
2 tablespoons Morton's "tender-quick"
1 teaspoon granulated garlic
1 teaspoon Black pepper
1 cup of beef broth.

Marinate overnight, then remove and blot excess marindade from meat with paper towels. I usually put additional seasoning right on the meat before smoking/drying. Fresh cracked pepper or red pepper flakes. Whatever floats your boat. I usually get the smoke going on my smoker, then turn down the heat and put the jerky in for just a few hours then finish it in the dehydrator.

The_Kapn
08-17-2006, 06:39 PM
Jerky marinade and seasoning is entirely a personal thing.
Some common marinade ingredients:
Soy (lots),
Whorsey Sauce.
Tabasco (red and now chipolte and green)
MAGI
Liquid Smoke (one of the few places it works real well)
Other spices to taste.
I make 3 cups per 8 lb of raw meat (my basic load on the Excalibur).

I keep the marinade simple and then use a dusting of spices for the "real deal" on final flavor. Marinade overnight, place on racks, and then dust with your favorite flavors.
I screwed around forever with this step, and then just settled on Emeril's Essence. Mixed at home in bulk--not bought in little bottles.

I warn folks that my Jerky is Salty, Spicey, and Chewy. It is JERKY :lol:

Have fun with the venison.

TIM

Kevin
08-17-2006, 07:05 PM
This is definately a personal thing. I prefer dry seasoning with garlic, onion, fresh cracked black pepper and just enough Morton's Tender Quick to help with curing it and making it turn red and not grey while smoking. A touch (small touch) of cayenne for heat. Again, that is my preference. Some like the Soy and Teriyaki, I just don't care for it in jerky. Jerky, in it's purest form is dried beef. The dry rub with salts starts the removal of water (look at it 12 to 24 hours after you rubbed it and you'll see a wet surface which is the moisture that the salt drew out of the meat). This is not barbecue. This is smoking. Low temps, 190* tops. This may not be your cup of tea but, I am fairly passionate about my jerky, and pay loving attention to the steps taken to make a great end product. There are many folks on this board with more experience and knowledge than me, I hope they will speak out.

FatDad
08-17-2006, 08:18 PM
Jason,
I found this website a few months ago and I have not tried any of
this yet but it looks like it will work real good on my WSM.

Click on the "Back To Jerky Preparation" then scroll all the way
down and you will see "Marinades & Smoke".

VERY INFORMATIVE site.
http://www.randyq.addr.com/jerky/ecbjerky/jerky_on_the_ecb.htm

Hope this helps !!
Good luck Brother !!

NorthernQ
08-18-2006, 06:47 AM
This is definately a personal thing. I prefer dry seasoning with garlic, onion, fresh cracked black pepper and just enough Morton's Tender Quick to help with curing it and making it turn red and not grey while smoking. A touch (small touch) of cayenne for heat. Again, that is my preference. Some like the Soy and Teriyaki, I just don't care for it in jerky. Jerky, in it's purest form is dried beef. The dry rub with salts starts the removal of water (look at it 12 to 24 hours after you rubbed it and you'll see a wet surface which is the moisture that the salt drew out of the meat). This is not barbecue. This is smoking. Low temps, 190* tops. This may not be your cup of tea but, I am fairly passionate about my jerky, and pay loving attention to the steps taken to make a great end product. There are many folks on this board with more experience and knowledge than me, I hope they will speak out.

Couldn't agree more, Kevin. Jerky is a simple pleasure.