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ModelMaker
07-26-2006, 07:43 AM
Has anybody low & slowed a porcupine? I had something burrowing under the spa gazebo and set the trap last night with venison jerky and marshmellows. So this mornig I go out and look and best I can figure I have a young porcupine in the trap. It's hard to be sure as he's mighty wet, we had three inches last night.
So is smoked porci a delicacy or just a hairy rat? Recipies appreciated.
ModelMaker
Oh, does anubody know how to clean the little bugger?

Sawdustguy
07-26-2006, 08:22 AM
A porcupine is a large rodent. It is claimed to be edible with a taste smiliar to giant rat. If you enjoy smoked giant rat go for it.

Jeff_in_KC
07-26-2006, 09:52 AM
Hoping there's actually a load of sarcasm in Model's post! :shock:

No smoked giant rat for me, thank you. :lol:

thirdeye
07-26-2006, 10:39 AM
Garlc ... Garllic is the key, lots of garlic. :-D

Well, if you are going to try it maybe a good soak in salt water or vinegar water like you do for possum before cooking.

Jorge
07-26-2006, 10:54 AM
I'd consider giving it to some neighbors I didn't care for. On the other hand some folks love Opossum.

Bigmista
07-26-2006, 11:21 AM
Gotta like food that comes with its own toothpicks...

nmayeux
07-26-2006, 11:27 AM
I've eaten plenty of squirrels, and aren't they just rats with furry tails?

Mark
07-26-2006, 11:34 AM
Leaving the porcupine with its head lower than the body, cut off it's feet and turn it on it's back. Brace the animal by putting rocks or logs on either side. Make your center cut by sliting the skin 3 to 4 inches at the breast bone. Insert your free hand and press the inner organs down out of the way as you continue to cut, now turning the blade of the knife upward so as not to pierce the intestines. Continue to press downward with your free hand as you go, and cut almost to the end of the gut cavity where the meat of the hind quarters begins. Once this long cut is made, roll the skin back about 3-4 inches on on either side of the cut, keeping to loose hairs away from the flesh. At this point the intestines and inards will be protruding. But before trying to remove them, hold the hind legs apart and continue a skin deep cut down the center all the way to the anus. Cut off the genitals. Then make a deep cut through the skin all around the anus. Next, prepare to remove the lower alimentary canal. This long tract continues from the mouth to the anus. It is more easily taken out if the animal is lying on it's side with it's legs downhill. Remove enough intestines from the gut cavity to allow room for your hand. These you will find randomly attached by a not very strong tissue. Find and take hold of the large intestine as nearly as possible to the already loosened anus. Remove enough intestines, as I said, to allow for your hand, pulling the intestines out through the 3-4 inch slit you have made. Use special care at this step NOT to rupture the thin walled urine sac. (locate this sac by tracing the tube that "leads to the outside). Grasp the tube, pinching it off to close the bladder, and after further freeing the bladder remove both, the tube and the bladder. The alimentary canal remains attached at the upper end but the lower end lies outside the carcass. The liver can be found at the upper edges of the stomach toward the back near the thin, tough, diaphram membrane. In reconnoitering for the liver, be careful not to pierce the gall bladder. Cut loose all of the lower alimentary tract by cutting it loose from the stomach at the base of the thin membrance that forms the diaphram between the rib cage and the lower cavity. Then remove the lungs, heart and upper alimentary canal. Wipe the interior of the cavity with a dry cloth. Do not allow any blood to remain as it will impart a 'fishy' flavor if you do. In warm weather, dust the interior cavity with pepper or powdered charcoal. Remove all hair and quills in one step by pulling off the skin. To shorten the cooling time, prop the cavity open with sticks. REMEMBER: Always skin animals as soon as possible after killing them. After cleaning, if not consumed immediately, porcupines should be cooled to below 40 degrees for a minimum of twenty-four hours. And you must find and remove musk kernels in small of back and under forelegs. DO THIS VERY CAREFULLY SO AS NOT TO RUPTURE.
THE RECIPE:
Soak cleaned carcass overnight in cool salt water. In the morning, bring this water to a boil. Drain and again immerse porcupine in cold water. Bring to a boil and drain a second time. Ideally, place the meat in a dutch oven. Add:

-3 cups water;
-1 rib celery;
-1 sliced medium sized oven
-1/4 teaspoon pepper;
-1 teaspoon salt.

simmer until tender...about 2.5 hours.

Or if you prefer, barbecue on a spit or grill. Apply seasoning. Barbecue sauce works well.

Jeff_in_KC
07-26-2006, 11:39 AM
I've eaten plenty of squirrels, and aren't they just rats with furry tails?

Yep, tree rats. Tried one once... tough as shoe leather! And tasted like chit! Not gonna do it again. Nor will I eat snapping turtle as I was conned into trying at the Cameron contest! :mad:

Kirk
07-26-2006, 11:45 AM
Reminds me of Delmar (Tim Blake Nelson) in O Brother, Where Art Thou?
"Care for some gopher Everett?"

midnight
07-26-2006, 01:48 PM
Anyone who has taken survival training will know that porcupine is one of the easiest survival foods to catch and kill. Just flip them over and start with the soft under belly.

midnight
07-26-2006, 01:50 PM
Or feed it to your dog....

http://www.snopes.com/photos/animals/porcupinedog.asp

jpw23
07-26-2006, 02:14 PM
Has anybody low & slowed a porcupine? I had something burrowing under the spa gazebo and set the trap last night with venison jerky and marshmellows. So this mornig I go out and look and best I can figure I have a young porcupine in the trap. It's hard to be sure as he's mighty wet, we had three inches last night.
So is smoked porci a delicacy or just a hairy rat? Recipies appreciated.
ModelMaker
Oh, does anubody know how to clean the little bugger?

Like many have said before, it probably tastes like rat, squirll, or anything else with buckteeth! But.....I'm not here to judge, I just cleaned, skinned, boiled, de-boned and made carp cakes!!!!:biggrin:

Doorbusters
07-26-2006, 02:23 PM
Gee, my idea of cleaning the prickly little burger is not near as long as the other post. I would start with a good shampoo, maybe car wash soap, then some conditioner. After 1 or 2 rinse cycles, get out the hair dryer, then drive him 10-12 miles out into the country and turn him loose.

Do not think I would even entertain the idea of eating him. Do you know what they eat????

ModelMaker
07-26-2006, 04:30 PM
Oh My God, my stomach hurts!!!! There has to be a SNL skit in there someplace.
Mark, I thought that was the way to clean 'em, just wasn't sure.
After a second cup of coffee this morning I decided to drive the bugger up to the top of Sheep Barn Hill and release him to the more wooded area there. I am a real beleiver in Karma so hope to have earned a smidge..
Thanks all,
ModelMaker

bbqjoe
07-26-2006, 04:39 PM
-3 cups water;
-1 rib celery;
-1 sliced medium sized oven
-1/4 teaspoon pepper;
-1 teaspoon salt.
It all sounds doable. Except that medium sliced oven part. How does one go about that?

Yakfishingfool
07-26-2006, 05:32 PM
Leaving the porcupine with its head lower than the body, cut off it's feet and turn it on it's back. Brace the animal by putting rocks or logs on either side. Make your center cut by sliting the skin 3 to 4 inches at the breast bone. Insert your free hand and press the inner organs down out of the way as you continue to cut, now turning the blade of the knife upward so as not to pierce the intestines. Continue to press downward with your free hand as you go, and cut almost to the end of the gut cavity where the meat of the hind quarters begins. Once this long cut is made, roll the skin back about 3-4 inches on on either side of the cut, keeping to loose hairs away from the flesh. At this point the intestines and inards will be protruding. But before trying to remove them, hold the hind legs apart and continue a skin deep cut down the center all the way to the anus. Cut off the genitals. Then make a deep cut through the skin all around the anus. Next, prepare to remove the lower alimentary canal. This long tract continues from the mouth to the anus. It is more easily taken out if the animal is lying on it's side with it's legs downhill. Remove enough intestines from the gut cavity to allow room for your hand. These you will find randomly attached by a not very strong tissue. Find and take hold of the large intestine as nearly as possible to the already loosened anus. Remove enough intestines, as I said, to allow for your hand, pulling the intestines out through the 3-4 inch slit you have made. Use special care at this step NOT to rupture the thin walled urine sac. (locate this sac by tracing the tube that "leads to the outside). Grasp the tube, pinching it off to close the bladder, and after further freeing the bladder remove both, the tube and the bladder. The alimentary canal remains attached at the upper end but the lower end lies outside the carcass. The liver can be found at the upper edges of the stomach toward the back near the thin, tough, diaphram membrane. In reconnoitering for the liver, be careful not to pierce the gall bladder. Cut loose all of the lower alimentary tract by cutting it loose from the stomach at the base of the thin membrance that forms the diaphram between the rib cage and the lower cavity. Then remove the lungs, heart and upper alimentary canal. Wipe the interior of the cavity with a dry cloth. Do not allow any blood to remain as it will impart a 'fishy' flavor if you do. In warm weather, dust the interior cavity with pepper or powdered charcoal. Remove all hair and quills in one step by pulling off the skin. To shorten the cooling time, prop the cavity open with sticks. REMEMBER: Always skin animals as soon as possible after killing them. After cleaning, if not consumed immediately, porcupines should be cooled to below 40 degrees for a minimum of twenty-four hours. And you must find and remove musk kernels in small of back and under forelegs. DO THIS VERY CAREFULLY SO AS NOT TO RUPTURE.
THE RECIPE:
Soak cleaned carcass overnight in cool salt water. In the morning, bring this water to a boil. Drain and again immerse porcupine in cold water. Bring to a boil and drain a second time. Ideally, place the meat in a dutch oven. Add:

-3 cups water;
-1 rib celery;
-1 sliced medium sized oven
-1/4 teaspoon pepper;
-1 teaspoon salt.

simmer until tender...about 2.5 hours.

Or if you prefer, barbecue on a spit or grill. Apply seasoning. Barbecue sauce works well.

Stay at Holiday Inn last night??

Kevin
07-26-2006, 05:44 PM
Maybe it would go with spatchcocked owl:
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=13283&highlight=spatchcocked+owl

nmayeux
07-26-2006, 05:53 PM
Yep, tree rats. Tried one once... tough as shoe leather! And tasted like chit! Not gonna do it again. Nor will I eat snapping turtle as I was conned into trying at the Cameron contest! :mad:No way it could have been the fault of the cook??? Some people swear that certain parts of pork and beef are inedible, but we prove them wrong everyday don't we? Fried squirrel and turtle soup are really good when prepared correctly! Hell, I'll eat tree rat and snappers before I'll eat one of ChiBill's chinese chickens!:shock: :twisted: :grin:
Meeeoooow....

pqbbq
07-26-2006, 07:37 PM
Or feed it to your dog....

http://www.snopes.com/photos/animals/porcupinedog.asp
I had a German shepard/cow dog cross that was huge named Caval when I farmed and ranched and he loved porcupines! And he never learned the leave the dang things alone! I would have to get a pair of ViseGrips and pull the quills out of his nose.

His other disgusting habit was to kill skunks, bury them for about 3 weeks, and then dig them up and role in the rotted skunk smell.

You couldn't stand to get near the animal after he did this.

thirdeye
07-26-2006, 08:00 PM
I had a German shepard/cow dog cross that was huge named Caval when I farmed and ranched and he loved porcupines! And he never learned the leave the dang things alone! I would have to get a pair of ViseGrips and pull the quills out of his nose.


Ouch. Did you cut the ends off with nippers first? It releases the pressure and they come out easier.

Brauma
07-26-2006, 09:12 PM
Hors Devours:

thirdeye
07-26-2006, 09:53 PM
Hors Devours:

APT's??

pqbbq
07-26-2006, 09:57 PM
Ouch. Did you cut the ends off with nippers first? It releases the pressure and they come out easier.
No one ever told me that!

I sure wished I had know that 'cause it wasn't a pleasant experience getting those things out - most normal folks would have taken the big dog to the vet to have them removed - but since I did most of the vet work on my cattle - I refused to take a dang dog to the vet for a few quills and we are talking a bunch of them.

He never tried to bite me when I did this.

Good advice if I ever get to move back home and retire on the old place.

FatDad
07-26-2006, 10:28 PM
Yep, tree rats. Tried one once... tough as shoe leather! And tasted like chit! Not gonna do it again. Nor will I eat snapping turtle as I was conned into trying at the Cameron contest! :mad:

Jeff,
Squirrel really is good. You are correct in the fact that they are tough
BUT....prepared the right way is the key.
When I was a kid my Aunt & Grandma used pressure cookers and today
I use a standard crock pot with cream of mushroom soup.
It is tender and good flavor....alot of small bones to watch for.

CarbonToe
07-27-2006, 03:51 AM
I used to roast Hedgehogs in the embers of the fire when I went camping in my younger days.

Gut and clean, fill cavity with any herbs you have, tie closed with string, wrap in grass or large leaves, cover in mud/clay, throw in hot embers for an hour or so depending on size.