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DanB
10-10-2013, 02:31 PM
Hi I have a Brinkmanns Smoke N Pit.. At first I was only using Kingfords charcoal and lump charcoal, yesterday I started putting in 2 pieces of my fireplace wood, just threw it in, when the charcoal was dying down.The wood burned really good, and kept the heat up. Would like to use more wood in the future, in combination with charcoal.
Here is my question the wood more I use won't that over smoke my food?

Thanks Dan
PS I just like a hint of smoke in my food.

dwfisk
10-10-2013, 02:39 PM
Depends. If you use well cured dry wood (do not soak the wood) and have a clean hot fire, your smoke will be clean and not over smoke your food. I cook exclusively with hickory (no charcoal) and can pretty much get any desired level of smoke I want. You can also wrap your meat in butcher paper (and put the meat back in the cooker) when you get the desired level of smoke & bark). I would suggest you give it a try by adding just a few chunks of the wood of your choice. If you like light smoke, you might be happier with a fruit wood like apple or peach.

SmittyJonz
10-10-2013, 02:41 PM
Just get an Electric or Pellet Smoker.

DanB
10-10-2013, 03:12 PM
Hi I genally use apple or cherry mini splits for pork.
The fireplace wood I used was seasoned. I don't really know what the fireplace wood was, either Oak or Maple, I'm guessing.
I was thinking of getting a cord of apple or cherry wood for the fireplace and use some for the smoker. I would have to cut it down to fit into the smoker firebox.
Thanks Dan
"Just get an Electric or Pellet Smoker" I have a electric smoker, prefer charcaol

CtTradArcher
10-10-2013, 09:42 PM
Careful! Or you may become addicted to smoking only with wood. I am slipping in that direction...

Packmanjim
10-10-2013, 10:10 PM
I use fireplace wood for my cooks. Oak, pecan, and Apple are my favorites. For my small smoky joe tamale pot smoker I just take wood splits and cut them on my chop saw in 2" lengths. Smoking with all wood is the only way to go.

Diesel Dave
10-11-2013, 05:53 AM
As said if the wood is good and seasoned, you should be fine.
Also I love cooking with wood, in my opinion, it gives a much better flavor than charcoal briquettes. Lump is real good too.

DanB
10-11-2013, 07:37 AM
Hi All Ok guys good responses. Sounds like wood is the way to go..I just worry about "over smoking the meat".
If I use a little charcoal to start, then add wood/apple/cherry, won't the foods take on all flavor the smoke?
Thanks Dan

YetiDave
10-11-2013, 08:52 AM
In my experience the over-smoked flavour only comes from a fire that isn't burning cleanly

DanB
10-11-2013, 09:58 AM
In my experience the over-smoked flavour only comes from a fire that isn't burning cleanly
Hi What do I have look for a clean burning fire?
Is that where I burn the wood out side and just use the ambers?
Thanks Dan

ButtBurner
10-11-2013, 10:02 AM
Hi What do I have look for a clean burning fire?
Is that where I burn the wood out side and just use the ambers?
Thanks Dan

no

what you want is flames. when its not flaming then you get a smoldering fire. Not a huge fire, just flames.

preheat the wood on top of the firebox before you put it in. It should burst into flames within a few seconds of putting it on the coals

and it helps to use smaller splits, you will get the hang of it.

pre heating the wood is real important! If it doesnt burst into flames leave the firebox door open until it does, should only take a minute or 2. If it doesnt, its not hot enough, take some welding gloves and pull it back off

this thread has real good info on this

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=7112

dano
10-11-2013, 10:14 AM
All good advice above...there are many factors. wood type, fuel, how long you add wood.
I tend to stick with the lighter wood (cherry and apple) and go by time/appearance for small cuts and internal temp/appearance with larger.
Once you figure out the way you like to do it your all set.

YetiDave
10-11-2013, 10:33 AM
My understanding of a clean burning fire is one where you're not having to really choke the airflow to keep temps down. Start off with a small fire and let it get up to temp with the vents set how you'd expect them to be set for the whole cook, rather than starting off with a large fire and having to force temps down

ButtBurner
10-11-2013, 10:47 AM
My understanding of a clean burning fire is one where you're not having to really choke the airflow to keep temps down. Start off with a small fire and let it get up to temp with the vents set how you'd expect them to be set for the whole cook, rather than starting off with a large fire and having to force temps down

I start with a larger fire than what I cook at, to heat up the pit and establish a bed of coals.

I let that burn down to cooking temp.

then its game (and meat) on!!

YetiDave
10-11-2013, 10:51 AM
Yeah fair play working it that way. I've just ended up with nasty smoke from choking down big fires

ButtBurner
10-11-2013, 10:53 AM
Yeah fair play working it that way. I've just ended up with nasty smoke from choking down big fires

well I dont choke them down so I dont have the issue

I just let it burn down and proceed

DanB
10-12-2013, 10:45 AM
Hi All OK guys here is my plan for my next smoke.
Put a layer of Kingsford,then a layer of RO lump,or visa versa,place 1/4 chimney of Kingfords on top, when the fire seems to dying down a little add the wood. I will add 1-2 pcs mini splits to the original fire for flavor.
I'M thinking it's only a matter of time and practice, before I get it right to my liking.
Thanks Dan