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mep
08-13-2013, 12:13 AM
Okay, after a cook and letting the fire go out, you clean all the ashes from your fire pit, but how or where do you dispose of the ashes? I've been throwing mine on some gravel in my landscaping.

aawa
08-13-2013, 12:15 AM
I have a small metal trashcan I put mine in and then put the lid on tight. After it gets semi full I dump it into my trashcan to be picked up by the trashman.

DownHomeQue
08-13-2013, 12:16 AM
I place cool ashes the day after in my parents garden... Seems to help with replenishing nutrients or something they say.. If no garden around.. Thro on grass and rinse thoroughly.. So they won't be on top

SmittyJonz
08-13-2013, 12:18 AM
yup dump them on grass and water .

bbqbull
08-13-2013, 01:06 AM
Ashes can start fires up to 7 days after they are removed from a fireplace, smoker or grill.

I always wait and then place them into a metal container. I leave them for at least 2 weeks on a concrete floor away from combustibles.

I heated with wood for over 10 years in my last home via wood stove.

I am offering my advice as I retired as a professional firefighter from 1973 to 1998.

nucornhusker
08-13-2013, 01:07 AM
I have a small metal trashcan I put mine in and then put the lid on tight. After it gets semi full I dump it into my trashcan to be picked up by the trashman.This is exactly what I do.

Ashes can start fires up to 7 days after they are removed from a fireplace, smoker or grill.

I always wait and then place them into a metal container. I leave them for at least 2 weeks on a concrete floor away from combustibles.

I heated with wood for over 10 years in my last home via wood stove.

I am offering my advice as I retired as a professional firefighter from 1973 to 1998.I did NOT know about the 7 day wait. Wow, no I feel really irresponsible about dumping some ashes after only a few days now. :twitch: Great info to know though. Thank you for posting that! :thumb:

Titch
08-13-2013, 01:09 AM
Charcoal and wood ashes go on my Vegie patch, snails hate it when on top of the surface,
Plants appear to like it as well.

Bbqull , advice is noted.:thumb:

marubozo
08-13-2013, 01:15 AM
I always dump my ashes into a small container and leave them on the doorstep of the local funeral home with a post-it note on top that says "He will be missed."

J'ville Grill
08-13-2013, 01:21 AM
I empty mine into a plastic bag many days after cooking and put out with the weekly trash.

Titch
08-13-2013, 01:22 AM
:laugh:

landarc
08-13-2013, 01:41 AM
I put them in my compost pile, and water thoroughly. I prefer to leave them in a metal bucket for a few days first, but, not 7 days. I need to reconsider that, thanks Mike

Damn True
08-13-2013, 01:45 AM
I put them in my compost bin

aawa
08-13-2013, 01:50 AM
Ashes can start fires up to 7 days after they are removed from a fireplace, smoker or grill.



I am offering my advice as I retired as a professional firefighter from 1973 to 1998.

I didnt know about the 7 day thing. Thank god my metal ash can is big enough that I empty it about every month and a half to 2 months

Gasket
08-13-2013, 02:15 AM
i put them in my compost bin

+++1.

YetiDave
08-13-2013, 03:31 AM
+1 for composting

5string
08-13-2013, 07:00 AM
Many years ago, my late ex mother in law decided our fireplace needed cleaning. The ash was dumped into the trash can that sat outside next to the house. I arrived home from work that day to find the neighborhood full of fire trucks and my house fully engulfed in flame. I have the utmost respect for how long embers can stay hot.

IamMadMan
08-13-2013, 07:43 AM
I dump them between the rows of my vegetable garden, if any gets on the plants, it has never hurt them.

dwfisk
08-13-2013, 07:54 AM
We have a burn pit on the farm for tree limbs and thr like, in they go.

wladrules
08-13-2013, 08:28 AM
I put mine in a metal bucket and after a week I put them in a plastic bag and into the trash outside.

akoda
08-13-2013, 08:34 AM
I have been putting mine in the trash for pickup but I will change that and start putting them in my garden.

Bob in St. Louis
08-13-2013, 10:40 AM
7 days....What?

I put mine in the trash can the day after I smoke.
But the WSM only has a handfull of ashes remaining anyway. I couldn't imagine waiting until the next week to pitch them.

dajogejr
08-13-2013, 11:09 AM
I used to put mine in my refuse/lawn bags. Until one day...about 4 days after a cook, I noticed my bag on the curb smoking.
Within a few minutes, it literally looked like a cigarette being dragged on...it just burnt from the top down in no time at all... I was too busy running for the hose to get a camera (sometimes common sense wins...even if it didn't in the beginning...lol)

I put mine in a mini-metal trash can and when it fills up, I put it in a contractor garbage bag... but I only have to empty the can once every other month in the summer.
During the winter time, I burn indoors to supplement heat....so, it's more frequent.

tpope
08-13-2013, 05:01 PM
Wood ashes correct high acid content in soil like lime does. Use mine in the garden or onto the compost pile and then the garden. A metal garbage can with a lid will keep you from setting your compost pile on fire.

Crazy Harry
08-13-2013, 09:19 PM
compost pile

Happy Hapgood
08-13-2013, 09:25 PM
The ash makes for good fertilizer. I wait 2 days and then sprinkle it lightly over the lawn.

TheBill
08-13-2013, 09:26 PM
Many, many people have lost their homes to fire by putting ashes in the garage can too soon.

I too use a 3 gallon metal bucket with a tight lid, store for two weeks and through in the woods behind my house.

sbshaveice
08-13-2013, 09:31 PM
Ashes can start fires up to 7 days after they are removed from a fireplace, smoker or grill.

8.

Do you have a citation for this? I don't believe it's true. Wood ash is non toxic and virtually inert. Hot embers buried in ash is a different thing, but ash itself should pose no risk.

popeye
08-13-2013, 10:33 PM
composting .

KillerKaveMan
08-13-2013, 10:39 PM
back to mother earth. thrown in the garden, lawn, flower beds then watered to keep it from blowing all over the place. better than going to the dump

bbqbull
08-13-2013, 10:45 PM
Ashes can start fires up to 7 days after they are removed from a fireplace, smoker or grill.

I always wait and then place them into a metal container. I leave them for at least 2 weeks on a concrete floor away from combustibles.

I heated with wood for over 10 years in my last home via wood stove.

I am offering my advice as I retired as a professional firefighter from 1973 to 1998.

Do you have a citation for this? I don't believe it's true. Wood ash is non toxic and virtually inert. Hot embers buried in ash is a different thing, but ash itself should pose no risk.

Yes I read an article the other day about ashes and clinkers.

I also carry a gold badge from firefighting from pre 1972 to 1998 as a fulltime firefighter. The ashes insulate the clinkers or red hot coals and I have had the personal privilege of fighting way too many fires due to coals placed into cardboard boxes and left on wooden decks or plastic dumpsters.

Ashes are an awesome insulation media. add red hot coals and cover them with more ashes......Life happens.
Hope that helps!

Found this via Google.
Dealing with wood ashes

1. Remove a small amount of ash frequently. During 24 hour heating in cold weather, it may be appropriate to remove a small amount of ash each morning before the new fire is kindled to make raking coals and kindling loads throughout the day more convenient.
2. Ashes often contain live coals which can stay hot and give off carbon monoxide for days. So, put ashes in a metal container with a lid and place the container outside the house and away from combustible material.
3. Some ash can be used as a lawn and garden fertilizer to provide soil nutrients and reduce acidity. It can be used on compost piles to maintain neutral acidity levels. Some people use ashes to provide traction on icy driveways and sidewalks. Excess wood ash can be taken to garbage disposal sites.

charrederhead
08-13-2013, 11:50 PM
In winter (I burn wood) I always save a 5-gal. bucket of ash for the sidewalks/driveway in case of ice. Nothing works better.

Otherwise, I compost it (lump) or dump it on the ground "out back".

Is there any chemical residue left in KBB-type ash?

Damn True
08-14-2013, 12:09 AM
In winter (I burn wood) I always save a 5-gal. bucket of ash for the sidewalks/driveway in case of ice. Nothing works better.

Otherwise, I compost it (lump) or dump it on the ground "out back".

Is there any chemical residue left in KBB-type ash?

I've read that there can be remnants of binders and other chemicals in some commercial briquettes. No idea which brands do or don't though.

USMC
08-14-2013, 03:18 AM
Mix with equal parts of butter and milk, heat on stovetop and spread on toast. :wacko: