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Oink Oink
05-18-2013, 08:47 AM
I have a leg of lamb (left of over from Easter) and am planning to cook it on the kettle.

I have never cooked a bone in leg of lamb outside before and was thinking that I would cook it at 325 to 350 until its done.

In the past when cooking at theses temps/lengths I would have used briquettes but I am trying to get used to using lump charcoal...

So my question is: what type of set up should I use to maintain 325 to 350 for 2 to 3 hours (I am estimating based on indoor oven cooks at this temp) on a Weber 22.5 Kettle using lump charcoal?

strugs
05-18-2013, 11:12 AM
Leg of lamb is one of my favs, and the last few times I have done it, I used the reverse sear method and had amazing results.



To maintain 350 on my 22" kettle, I dump about 3/4 of a weber sized chimney of unlit charcoal in a pile on one side of the charcoal grate and toss just a handful of lit charcoal on top of the pile. Then I put the lid on, open the top vent all the way and leave the bottom vent open just a sliver. I find that on my kettle, this settles in around 350 to 375 but I can fine tune it by adjusting the top vent.


Anyways the trick to my leg o lamb success is the reverse sear. I put my maverick thermometer probe in the meatiest part of the leg and put the leg as far away from the charcoal as possible (about an inch from the edge of the kettle). Leave the leg in for however long it takes to get up to 90% of your target temp (I like lamb med rare, so I shoot for about 120F). Once it reaches the temp, I pull it out of the kettle and put it on a platter and loosely cover it with foil. Then I take the grate off the weber and use tongs or a metal instrument to stir up the coals and fully open the bottom vent. Leave the cover off for about 5 minutes and as long as you have not burned up all of your unlit charcoal, you should get a pretty good fire going. Make sure the remaining charcoal is well distributed and then put the lamb back on directly over the coals. Put the cover on and wait 2 minutes, then flip it, wait 2 more minutes and then your leg should be done with some nice charring on the outside that will probably give you cancer but tastes delicious.

GARNAAL
05-18-2013, 12:11 PM
or grill on a rotisserie?

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=157716

Oink Oink
05-18-2013, 12:24 PM
Leg of lamb is one of my favs, and the last few times I have done it, I used the reverse sear method and had amazing results.



To maintain 350 on my 22" kettle, I dump about 3/4 of a weber sized chimney of unlit charcoal in a pile on one side of the charcoal grate and toss just a handful of lit charcoal on top of the pile. Then I put the lid on, open the top vent all the way and leave the bottom vent open just a sliver. I find that on my kettle, this settles in around 350 to 375 but I can fine tune it by adjusting the top vent.


Anyways the trick to my leg o lamb success is the reverse sear. I put my maverick thermometer probe in the meatiest part of the leg and put the leg as far away from the charcoal as possible (about an inch from the edge of the kettle). Leave the leg in for however long it takes to get up to 90% of your target temp (I like lamb med rare, so I shoot for about 120F). Once it reaches the temp, I pull it out of the kettle and put it on a platter and loosely cover it with foil. Then I take the grate off the weber and use tongs or a metal instrument to stir up the coals and fully open the bottom vent. Leave the cover off for about 5 minutes and as long as you have not burned up all of your unlit charcoal, you should get a pretty good fire going. Make sure the remaining charcoal is well distributed and then put the lamb back on directly over the coals. Put the cover on and wait 2 minutes, then flip it, wait 2 more minutes and then your leg should be done with some nice charring on the outside that will probably give you cancer but tastes delicious.
Thanks for the idea strugs! Are you using lump charcoal?

Oink Oink
05-18-2013, 12:25 PM
or grill on a rotisserie?

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=157716
On the grill but I would like to get a rotisserie one of these days!

fantomlord
05-18-2013, 12:43 PM
+1 for the reverse sear.
and I'd throw in a little grapevine if you have it...or the woody stems from some fresh rosemary...or, just a chunk of cherry--this will give it a nice color, but not overpower it with smoke flavor.

Oink Oink
05-18-2013, 05:13 PM
So I ended up reading some of the above suggestions after I had already started down another path.

I used a mix of mustard and spices. I ran a snake set up with RO lump, cherry wood, and all the vents open. The dome temps were reading about 400 for all but the last 20 min of the cook when it dropped to 350. I pulled it at about 140 IT.

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=79537&stc=1&d=1368914694

I was pretty happy with the turn out.

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=79538&stc=1&d=1368914694

Not the most artistic pic, but I hardly had time to get this one, everyone was so quick to dig in. I think next time I will add more salt to the meat. I really like the cherry wood.

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=79539&stc=1&d=1368914694

Titch
05-18-2013, 05:16 PM
Looks perfect to me:thumb:

BobM
05-18-2013, 05:17 PM
It looks great! :clap:

buccaneer
05-18-2013, 05:18 PM
You did real good, that's close to Australian!!!
:clap:

Oink Oink
05-18-2013, 05:30 PM
You did real good, that's close to Australian!!!
:clap:
That is quite a compliment many thanks!! :-D

fantomlord
05-19-2013, 07:08 AM
looks great!

HankB
05-19-2013, 07:54 AM
Leg of lamb was the inaugural cook on my 26. You could probably do it as well on a 22 as well.

I would suggest using one charcoal basket which you will have to replenish several times through the cook.

Here is the detail on mine. (http://smpoke-on.blogspot.com/2012/04/leg-of-lamb.html)

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-Bya4zIPSiY8/T4ImE0WQ9-I/AAAAAAAAJKo/hQXKTRLzb0o/s800/DSC_5115-PP.JPG

tpope
05-19-2013, 08:47 AM
Nice looking lamb! I would dig in.

BigBellyBen77
05-19-2013, 09:46 AM
Looks great! I love using a red wine marinade with garlic and a little lemon pepper. Reverse sear is how I've best luck.

DoctorQ
05-24-2013, 07:50 AM
Wow some good looking lamb there :thumb:

I am tempted by Hoggett or Mutton - anyone tried either of these cooked low and slow...?

Smokey Mick
05-24-2013, 07:54 AM
Leg of lamb is one of my favs, and the last few times I have done it, I used the reverse sear method and had amazing results.



To maintain 350 on my 22" kettle, I dump about 3/4 of a weber sized chimney of unlit charcoal in a pile on one side of the charcoal grate and toss just a handful of lit charcoal on top of the pile. Then I put the lid on, open the top vent all the way and leave the bottom vent open just a sliver. I find that on my kettle, this settles in around 350 to 375 but I can fine tune it by adjusting the top vent.


Anyways the trick to my leg o lamb success is the reverse sear. I put my maverick thermometer probe in the meatiest part of the leg and put the leg as far away from the charcoal as possible (about an inch from the edge of the kettle). Leave the leg in for however long it takes to get up to 90% of your target temp (I like lamb med rare, so I shoot for about 120F). Once it reaches the temp, I pull it out of the kettle and put it on a platter and loosely cover it with foil. Then I take the grate off the weber and use tongs or a metal instrument to stir up the coals and fully open the bottom vent. Leave the cover off for about 5 minutes and as long as you have not burned up all of your unlit charcoal, you should get a pretty good fire going. Make sure the remaining charcoal is well distributed and then put the lamb back on directly over the coals. Put the cover on and wait 2 minutes, then flip it, wait 2 more minutes and then your leg should be done with some nice charring on the outside that will probably give you cancer but tastes delicious.

Hes got it:cool: