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Subzerogriller
04-06-2013, 11:05 AM
I'm looking for a good chef's knife and came across Tamahagane on cutleryandmore.com. Anyone know anything about this brand? The description sounds awesome for the money, but I'm not all that knowledgeable about knives just yet. Don't want to go wasting $100 on something that isn't what I'd hoped it would be. Any advice would be appreciated.

HeSmellsLikeSmoke
04-06-2013, 11:10 AM
I hope Buccaneer or Landarc sees this thread and jumps in. Both are quite knowledgeable about Japanese knives.

Subzerogriller
04-06-2013, 11:14 AM
Thanks, if they don't maybe I'll toss them a PM quick...

landarc
04-06-2013, 12:36 PM
I see thread

landarc
04-06-2013, 12:39 PM
I'll reply in detail when I get home. Meanwhile, which one are you looking at, and what do you want it to do?

Teltum
04-06-2013, 01:17 PM
100$ is a good stamped knife or an inexpensive forged knife. http://www.cheftalk.com/t/69656/tamahagane-san-tsubame-knives-vs-robert-welch-vs-wusthof-ikon-creme I always go to chef talk for my cutlery questions. I will be honest my personal chefs knife is a 30$ victorinox 10" chefs knife(I love this knife). I am saving for the wusthof ikon but that is $180 a knife. I love the look of the shan but me and the old lady are right and left handed so the awesome jap knifes are not an option because we would need to buy one left and one right euro blade designs are normally ambidextrous.

Bludawg
04-06-2013, 01:52 PM
I like this knife it has some great qualities that you find in knives costing 2-3 times as much.> Hand forged, Hard steel VG5 holds a very keen edge due to a higher carbon content, the 410 outer layer has excellent corrosion resistance BUCK uses a variant as the blade steel in their knives. Mircarta handle material this stuff is almost indestrictable and impervoius to moisture, oils & oders, and good gripability My Favorite Skinner has a Micarta handle, If I was looking for a New Knife these would be on my short list

landarc
04-06-2013, 02:28 PM
The Tamahagane knives are commonly known as Western-style knives in Japan. They are not single bevel, they are usually a symmetrical blade with a longer angle than most Western knives. This is accomplished with the two steel blade process they use.

I consider these to be quite similar to the lower end Shun blades, offering a very hard, fine grained steel edge, buffered with the soft stainless steel. As Bludawg mentioned, the stainless is a similar steel to what Buck uses, but, they harden it much more. I have tested out the Tamahagane Chef knife, and for $100, it is a solid buy.

For my use, and bearing in mind, my go to Chef knife right now is my old trusty Wusthof 8", I like this type of knife and seriously considered the Tamahagane and Shun knives to replace my Wusthof for every day use. I use a Dexter-Russel and have used Victorinox, and they are fine knives for the price. But, given a choice, I would never choose them for my kitchen.

I have decided my next two knife purchases will be a moderately priced 240mm carbon steel gyuto and a carbon steel Nakiri, I much prefer carbon steel over any stainless steel blade, the steel just holds an edge better. I hope that helps, if you have more questions, feel free to ask in this thread, I will check back later.

popeye
04-06-2013, 07:10 PM
The Tamahagane knives are commonly known as Western-style knives in Japan. They are not single bevel, they are usually a symmetrical blade with a longer angle than most Western knives. This is accomplished with the two steel blade process they use.

I consider these to be quite similar to the lower end Shun blades, offering a very hard, fine grained steel edge, buffered with the soft stainless steel. As Bludawg mentioned, the stainless is a similar steel to what Buck uses, but, they harden it much more. I have tested out the Tamahagane Chef knife, and for $100, it is a solid buy.

For my use, and bearing in mind, my go to Chef knife right now is my old trusty Wusthof 8", I like this type of knife and seriously considered the Tamahagane and Shun knives to replace my Wusthof for every day use. I use a Dexter-Russel and have used Victorinox, and they are fine knives for the price. But, given a choice, I would never choose them for my kitchen.

I have decided my next two knife purchases will be a moderately priced 240mm carbon steel gyuto and a carbon steel Nakiri, I much prefer carbon steel over any stainless steel blade, the steel just holds an edge better. I hope that helps, if you have more questions, feel free to ask in this thread, I will check back later.



i alsohave a wusthof 8" and i love it . But i also have a cleaver that has nothing but japanies writeing on it that i do all my chopping with . (bought it in a garage sale for .30 cents

Subzerogriller
04-07-2013, 11:57 PM
Thanks for all the input! Is there an advantage/disadvantage to the San vs. the San Tsubame, or is it simply a cosmetic difference? Links to both are here if needed:

http://www.cutleryandmore.com/tamahagane-san-tsubame-pakkawood/hammered-chefs-knife-p121744

http://www.cutleryandmore.com/tamahagane-san/chefs-knife-p117876

Also wondering if Micarta would be preferred over pakkawood, or vice versa. And it looks like the Shun knives are only slightly higher priced on cutlery and more; are they much better than Tamahagane? Really appreciate y'all helping me narrow this down!