PDA

View Full Version : Anyone ever over rubbed their ribs?


Happy Hapgood
04-04-2013, 08:10 PM
I poured it on thick the night before and then the next morning, covered them again before going on the WSM. They looked Great butt, I could have toned it down a tad.

How much is enough and when do you apply it?

Thanks for any and all input. :thumb:

aawa
04-04-2013, 08:13 PM
I apply 1 coating of rub, then start the fire. After the fire is all set and getting thin blue smoke, I put the ribs onto the smoker.

---k---
04-04-2013, 08:16 PM
Done it once. I was trying out a new rub. It was Gary Wivott's rub that I purchased from Spice House in Chicago. I guess they made that batch a little spicy and I put it on shake and bake style. Oh man where they spicy hot. I think my wife spit out her first bite. I could only handle two bones before giving up. Wow.

These days, I skip the mustard and cover the meat good to the point where the natural color isn't obvious, but short of caking or clumping. I also rub only 2 to 4 hours prior. They come out good to my liking, but I'm not going to claim to be a professional.

Carbon
04-04-2013, 08:19 PM
I've over-salted mine in the past.

landarc
04-04-2013, 08:21 PM
I have over done it a few times. Either with a bad experimental blend or just over doing it. I find that my preferred method is a light rub before firing the pit up. Let the meat sit with the ceiling fan on, to aid in creating a pellicle. Then a second light layer over the pellicle. This lets me use the pellicle, which is a little sticky, to hold the second layer of rub on. Gets a better surface texture.

Happy Hapgood
04-04-2013, 08:28 PM
I've over-salted mine in the past.

Oh btw, I did that too. Thanks.

Smokin Ribs
04-04-2013, 08:28 PM
I apply 1 coating of rub, then start the fire. After the fire is all set and getting thin blue smoke, I put the ribs onto the smoker.

Thats exactly what i do

Happy Hapgood
04-04-2013, 08:31 PM
Done it once. I was trying out a new rub. It was Gary Wivott's rub that I purchased from Spice House in Chicago. I guess they made that batch a little spicy and I put it on shake and bake style. Oh man where they spicy hot. I think my wife spit out her first bite. I could only handle two bones before giving up. Wow.

These days, I skip the mustard and cover the meat good to the point where the natural color isn't obvious, but short of caking or clumping. I also rub only 2 to 4 hours prior. They come out good to my liking, but I'm not going to claim to be a professional.

I think you are a pro. But I don't do mustard and for the record, I don't boil them either. :becky:

Happy Hapgood
04-04-2013, 08:35 PM
What about applying the rub the night before then covering with plastic wrap in the fridge until the next day? It soaks in good. I did a heavy recoat right before putting them on.

landarc
04-04-2013, 08:36 PM
I have done the rub the night before and wrap very tight in plastic wrap, I use a light coat, it works great. I like ribs done this way, but, it does require doing it the night before. Which often gets passed over around here.

Happy Hapgood
04-04-2013, 08:42 PM
I have over done it a few times. Either with a bad experimental blend or just over doing it. I find that my preferred method is a light rub before firing the pit up. Let the meat sit with the ceiling fan on, to aid in creating a pellicle. Then a second light layer over the pellicle. This lets me use the pellicle, which is a little sticky, to hold the second layer of rub on. Gets a better surface texture.

I was using Simply Marvelous Sweet and Spicy. Could not not get enough. I OD'ed. Have not mentioned the taste though. They were GREAT! Only problem was that it was too much of a good thing.

El Ropo
04-04-2013, 09:03 PM
This topic has been discussed in length before. Ribs have a large surface to mass ratio. Very easy to over rub. I go light on ribs. Save the heavy rub downs for things like pork butts/shoulders, chuckies and briskets. But some people go light on their brisket rubs too.

dawg
04-04-2013, 09:05 PM
if your rub has a fare amount of salt in it and you rub and wrap the night before the cook they can and will turn out hammy tasting

HeSmellsLikeSmoke
04-04-2013, 09:06 PM
This topic has been discussed in length before. Ribs have a large surface to mass ratio. Very easy to over rub. I go light on ribs. Save the heavy rub downs for things like pork butts/shoulders, chuckies and briskets. But some people go light on their brisket rubs too.

To your point, I graduate the amount of rub to the taper of a brisket.
Thinner rub on the thinner end, thicker rub on the point end.

Vision
04-04-2013, 09:14 PM
Yes, it's kind of easy to when using a new rub. One thing that helps me is only using a light amount of rub on the bone side.

nucornhusker
04-04-2013, 10:33 PM
I use just enough to cover the ribs on both sides. I don't want to cover up the taste of the meat, so I don't go heavy on rubs.

Zin
04-04-2013, 10:33 PM
Light coating of Kosher salt, fresh cracked pepper, cumin and granulated garlic is my go to rub, its simple and delish.

Bludawg
04-04-2013, 10:37 PM
I poured it on thick the night before and then the next morning, covered them again before going on the WSM. They looked Great butt, I could have toned it down a tad.

How much is enough and when do you apply it?

Thanks for any and all input. :thumb: i use very little like adding S&P at the table.I season mine 15 min before I cook.

BobM
04-04-2013, 10:46 PM
I apply one, thin layer of rub to my ribs.

martyleach
04-04-2013, 10:53 PM
I am sure that everyone has over rubbed their ribs once or twice. I sure have. But the good new is that most of it gets lost in the cook. So you really have to overdo it to totally screw up. It is the salt that sticks around after the cayenne, paprika and sugar die with the heat. So, as important as salt is.... don't overdo it!

westy
04-05-2013, 03:50 AM
I do a light coat about a half hour before and then sometimes another light coat about half way through. Although, lately I have only been sprinkling a little salt and pepper on at the beginning and some vinegar sauce at the table. :heh: Good stuff.

Vendinguy
04-05-2013, 04:30 AM
What about applying the rub the night before then covering with plastic wrap in the fridge until the next day? It soaks in good. I did a heavy recoat right before putting them on.

Seems like last time I did that, the rub made them a bit too spicy and salty. I have gone back to rubbing the ribs just a couple of hours prior to smoking.

Mahoney86
04-05-2013, 07:45 AM
I feel like rub is also all about the practice and the season to taste method. I know its hard and even I forget to do it all of the time is measure EVERYTHING and take notes each cook. It makes it easier to try and replicate your successful cooks. When I cook St Louis I use a tablespoon of rub per side, baby backs half a table spoon or less. I still want to see the meat showing through but also the rub should be noticeable to the eyes. This is what works for me, but may be too much/too little for others. It also depends on the rub and what is in it. Heavy salt will get pelicle, heavy sugar need to watch it burning and turning black etc... Measure Measure Measure

5string
04-05-2013, 07:56 AM
Depends if you want your ribs to taste like pork or the rub. The rub is a "seasoning" intended to inhance the flavor of what it's on, not to be the dominant flavor. I also use a very light coat of no salt rub the night before then a tight wrap with plastic.
The worst example of over use of rub is the Rendezvous in Memphis. All you can taste is the rub.

NickTheGreat
04-05-2013, 08:04 AM
I used to rub everything the night before. But I've found this isn't necessary on ribs and not really on a butt or a brisket. I like to give 'em a few hours, but thats it.

Mahoney86
04-05-2013, 08:14 AM
I used to rub everything the night before. But I've found this isn't necessary on ribs and not really on a butt or a brisket. I like to give 'em a few hours, but thats it.

Agreed. I use to stress like crazy to get all my racks rubbed and wrapped the night before. Really no need to do this on such a thin piece of pork. Trim, season and let the rub sit on while you're getting your fire lit and your temps stable

code3rrt
04-05-2013, 08:19 AM
I've always had a tendency to over season, so I really try to watch it. Really what it comes down to is personal taste and perception. What one calls a light rub another may see as over rubbed. With trial and error you'll eventually find what is just right for you.
There is a lot of great advice here, but Mahoney86 is spot on. Keeping an acurate record of your cooks can be a real PITA sometimes, but when you find the process that really hits your hot button, it does pay off. I hate it when I cook something on the fly that comes out just spectacular, but I can't replicate it, cuz I didn't really pay careful attention to what I did.

KC

BB-Kuhn
04-05-2013, 08:59 AM
I've overdone it by a mile once or twice when I was new to the game.

Less is almost always more, i've learned. An underseasoned but well cooked rib is still delicious, an overseasoned one makes you want to eat something else.

If you have a sweet rub, you have to put a LOT on to ruin them, but if you have more of a spicy/hot rub, too much is awful.

---k---
04-05-2013, 10:59 AM
Depends if you want your ribs to taste like pork or the rub. The rub is a "seasoning" intended to inhance the flavor of what it's on, not to be the dominant flavor. .

I was about to make this exact point. Totally agree.

El Ropo
04-05-2013, 11:43 AM
I feel like rub is also all about the practice and the season to taste method. I know its hard and even I forget to do it all of the time is measure EVERYTHING and take notes each cook. It makes it easier to try and replicate your successful cooks. When I cook St Louis I use a tablespoon of rub per side, baby backs half a table spoon or less. I still want to see the meat showing through but also the rub should be noticeable to the eyes. This is what works for me, but may be too much/too little for others. It also depends on the rub and what is in it. Heavy salt will get pelicle, heavy sugar need to watch it burning and turning black etc... Measure Measure Measure

LOL, I'm exactly the opposite. I sprinkle a little bit of dis, a little bit of dat. No two cooks turn out the same. It's about the cooking process, not the exactness of the rub for me.

sparky'
04-05-2013, 12:33 PM
I apply 1 coating of rub, then start the fire. After the fire is all set and getting thin blue smoke, I put the ribs onto the smoker.

that's the same thing I do also.

gmag
04-05-2013, 07:02 PM
I too am guilty of over-rubbing. I ruined a perfectly good rack of Berkshire spares :(

Terry The Toad
04-05-2013, 08:37 PM
I have always marveled at the amount of rub I see used in some cooking shows. I tend to go on the light side. Sometimes I wonder if I need to use a little more. But, I like the smoke to do most of the work.

1911Ron
04-05-2013, 09:53 PM
The first time i did ribs without a deflector in my uds, i rubbed them the night before, then rubbed them again before going out to light the drum.

When they were done they had a real hard bark on them and were barely edible and they did not get rave reviews:shock:

Grinder10
04-06-2013, 06:31 AM
I think you are a pro. But I don't do mustard and for the record, I don't boil them either. :becky:

You should try boiling them in mustard and then applying the rub. :wink: