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View Full Version : Penzey's and Mild Bill's Both Say Chili Peppers, Not Chile Peppers


HeSmellsLikeSmoke
04-04-2013, 07:12 AM
I just noticed that both companies, who should know, say "chili" peppers on their web sites. Is the use of the "chile" spelling for peppers, which we seem to agree on here, something new?

We all know that Chile is a country and chili con carne is spelled with an "i", but the proper spelling of chile/chili for peppers now has me confused.

Oh yeah, it's Red Hot Chili Peppers for the band name too.

Ron_L
04-04-2013, 07:34 AM
OK Mr. Smarty Pants...

Explain this...

https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/548884_458575944218357_1312182999_n.jpg

:becky:

I just saw this on Facebook and it was posted by the folks who run "Chilli" fest.

HeSmellsLikeSmoke
04-04-2013, 07:40 AM
Landarc is our Resident 'splainer, not me. :becky:

But, I think I have found a potential answer. Chile is the Spanish spelling and chili is English spelling.

CharredApron
04-04-2013, 08:11 AM
International Chili Society, they ought to know!

HeSmellsLikeSmoke
04-04-2013, 08:24 AM
International Chili Society, they ought to know!

That is for Chili Con Carne which we all agree on, not the peppers, where I am confused.

Hey, wait, if the Spanish spelling is chile then chili con carne makes no sense. Dang.

Gnaws on Pigs
04-04-2013, 08:29 AM
I've always thought that "chili" was a spicy stew-like dish made of ground meat, peppers, beans, and such; and that "chile" was a hot pepper, and that "Chile" was a country. :confused:

HeSmellsLikeSmoke
04-04-2013, 08:34 AM
I've always thought that "chili" was a spicy stew-like dish made of ground meat, peppers, beans, and such; and that "chile" was a hot pepper, and that "Chile" was a country. :confused:

I believe your understanding is what most Brethren agree upon, including me. I just point out in this thread, however, that two of the best spice supply companies, don't. That is what now has me confused.

jmoney7269
04-04-2013, 08:34 AM
I have always thought chili powder was a blend of garlic, onion, salt, oregano, cumin and pure ground CHILE powder.

Gnaws on Pigs
04-04-2013, 08:36 AM
I have always thought chili powder was a blend of garlic, onion, salt, oregano, cumin and pure ground CHILE powder.

Me too- in other words, seasoning for making chili.

HeSmellsLikeSmoke
04-04-2013, 08:38 AM
I have always thought chili powder was a blend of garlic, onion, salt, oregano, cumin and pure ground CHILE powder.

Go look for ground chile powder at Mild Bill's or Penzey's and you will share my confusion.

NickTheGreat
04-04-2013, 08:43 AM
I'm just a poor boy from a poor family, but I have never heard of chile peppers.

From Wikipedia (it's not letting me post the link)
The chili pepper (also chile pepper or chilli pepper, from Nahuatl (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nahuatl) chīlli (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aztec_cuisine) ['t͡ʃiːlːi] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA_for_Nahuatl)) is the fruit[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chili_pepper#cite_note-1) of plants from the genus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genus) Capsicum (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capsicum), members of the nightshade family, Solanaceae (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solanaceae). The term in British English and in Australia, New Zealand, India,[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chili_pepper#cite_note-2) Malaysia and other Asian countries is just chilli without "pepper".

Gnaws on Pigs
04-04-2013, 08:47 AM
It's rainy and chilly here today. :biggrin1:

HeSmellsLikeSmoke
04-04-2013, 08:48 AM
OK Mr. Smarty Pants...

Explain this...

https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/548884_458575944218357_1312182999_n.jpg

:becky:

I just saw this on Facebook and it was posted by the folks who run "Chilli" fest.

Ron, I just ran across this on Wikipedia

"The chili pepper (also chile pepper or chilli pepper, from Nahuatl chīlli ['t͡ʃiːlːi]) is the fruit[1] of plants from the genus Capsicum, members of the nightshade family, Solanaceae. The term in British English and in Australia, New Zealand, India,[2] Malaysia and other Asian countries is just chilli without "pepper"."

Captain Stupid
04-04-2013, 08:52 AM
What about Chilly Willy?

superlazy
04-04-2013, 07:54 PM
Didn't I just post this in another thread?
http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penzeys/p-penzeysancho.html

HeSmellsLikeSmoke
04-04-2013, 07:59 PM
Didn't I just post this in another thread?
http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penzeys/p-penzeysancho.html

Looks like you did. Did you pick up on the "wrong" spelling for chile in the thread?

Marrs
04-04-2013, 08:09 PM
I am of the "chile" pepper persuasion. Maybe this can help with the debate. http://www.chilepepperinstitute.org/

landarc
04-04-2013, 08:16 PM
Chile is the botanically correct spelling of the common name for any of the members of the family of Capsicum species. Once ground to powder, the use has lost some of this clarity, as most dictionaries have begun to allow colloquial, that is to say 'common' usage to be part of a words spelling.

But, chile is the correct term for the fruiting pods from all species of Capsicum which have capsaicin within their tissue. Pepper is the common name usage for all fruit from all members of the Capsicum family (that would include bell peppers).

Chili is the name for the mixture of chile peppers and additional spices, most commonly associated with the preparation of chili con carne, which derives it's name from the powder, and not the other way around. Note that chili powder only exists in the United States, Canada and England. In Mexico, the origin of chiles, the powder is not known. As traditionally, the spice blends are made on the day of use. They refer to powdered chile peppers as, wait for it, powdered chile peppers.

HeSmellsLikeSmoke
04-04-2013, 08:23 PM
Thanks landarc.

To add to your comments, I believe that chili con carne was developed in the United States in San Antonio, not in Mexico.