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PalmettoSmoke
04-03-2013, 12:10 PM
I went to Sam's yesterday to buy a brisket to practice with. It seems that my local Sam's Club only sells the flat. Is there any disadvantage to cooking just the flat? Brisket has always been my "bad" category in comps, so any advice is appreciated.

Stoke&Smoke
04-03-2013, 12:42 PM
The biggest disadvantage is that, at least around here, the Sams flat will cost almost twice what a full packer will cost, per lb.:evil:

Also, doing just the flat, try and make sure you leave enough fat on it to keep it from drying out. Seeing as you don't seem to have any Restaurant Depot outlets in your state, you might try asking the head butcher if he can order some packers for you. Our Sams only seems to have packers early in the year, never during comp season

JS-TX
04-03-2013, 12:49 PM
There are some cooks that know exactly how to cook a flat to perfection... I'm not one of them. I prefer packers, I think that extra meat/fat make for a juicier brisket. Then again, the flats I tried in the past were already trimmed of fat and sorta lean to begin with.

ButtBurner
04-03-2013, 12:53 PM
I dont do comps, but i would think that you would want to practice with packers.

I have cooked both, there is a difference in cooking them. I dont cook flats anymore. Only packers.

K-Train
04-03-2013, 01:21 PM
Get the biggest one you can with good fat coverage as mentioned above. The little guys tend to dry out

PalmettoSmoke
04-03-2013, 01:25 PM
Thanks for the advice. I'll check around at some of the local meat markets to see if they have anything. The flats at Sam's did seem to have a good bit of fat on top. I may buy one just to see...

Bludawg
04-03-2013, 01:27 PM
I don't normally cook Flats unless by request for an uneducated person. It is best to start out at a lower temp like 225 for the first couple of hrs, then run up to 250 to get the color you want then wrap it and bump it up to 275+ to finish at probe tender.YMMV

BobM
04-03-2013, 02:01 PM
I did these small flats a few weeks ago.
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=153868
They came out good.

TIMMAY
04-03-2013, 02:05 PM
Already mentioned flats are more expensive, some of em do not have much fat, so there is potential to dry out if you do not pay attention.

PalmettoSmoke
04-03-2013, 02:18 PM
Already mentioned flats are more expensive, some of em do not have much fat, so there is potential to dry out if you do not pay attention.

I see you are also in Columbia. Where do you get your meat from?

K-Train
04-03-2013, 02:21 PM
I cooked a 6.5lb flat for a friend of mine over easter. I was scared it would dry out so I layed bacon over a few spots that had less fat. Did a good job keeping it moist and a plus for me I had some bacon afterwards.:clap2:

PalmettoSmoke
04-03-2013, 02:24 PM
I was going to ask if adding fat was a good idea. Putting some bacon on top sounds good. Does it change the flavor at all (can you taste the bacon)? How did it affect the rub/bark?

Daggs
04-03-2013, 02:54 PM
They will order a case if you ask. Let them know you are interested in more than just 1! I scored some flats for cheap as far as flats go from my local SAMs!
http://i1079.photobucket.com/albums/w509/rebelgoose68/6A0D6F15-1504-4364-94D6-0FAF2B3C1079-846-000000C740554DE8.jpg

cpw
04-03-2013, 03:40 PM
Check your Super Walmart in the area. Around here, they'll carry Whole packers, but they're only select grade. Kroger is the same way. Most grocery stores will order you a whole packer of whatever grade you want, but you have to buy a case.

superlazy
04-03-2013, 03:54 PM
I was at sams earlier today when I spied some whole packers. I got all giddy until I saw the price, almost $5lb.:mad:

hogzillas
04-03-2013, 03:56 PM
I would think that if you asked them the Sam's would start to carry/order packers, mine did. Mine now carries both but may be out of one when I go by so I also have backup places like NY Butcher Shop & another butcher if I need to go that path. As posted above also check a Super Wally World if one is near you. Mine carries packers but they're lower grade than my Sam's. I will get one from SWW if I want to do a quick test cook & don't have time to go by Sam's but prefer what I find at Sam's. Check other grocery stores like Publix, Piggly Wiggly, etc & ask them if they'll carry/order for you.

If you do end up doing flats, in addition to more fat try injecting to keep from drying out. Try Angus over non Angus & USDA graded over non graded (no roll) & choice or better over select.

Terry The Toad
04-04-2013, 01:56 PM
Thanks for the advice. I'll check around at some of the local meat markets to see if they have anything. The flats at Sam's did seem to have a good bit of fat on top. I may buy one just to see...

My local mom & pop meat market is the only place around here to get a packer brisket (that I know of.) My Costco only sells flats. But, the little mom & pop place always has them, and they are $3.49/lb.

I've cooked the flats from Costco before, with mixed results.

Daggs
04-04-2013, 08:49 PM
I was at sams earlier today when I spied some whole packers. I got all giddy until I saw the price, almost $5lb.:mad:

You are an hour from Crystal Lake, packers are $2.48lb
Joe is the name of the guy in charge in the meat dept. it's worth a call and a drive if you pick up 2!

sdmiller72
04-05-2013, 10:59 AM
I like cooking at 225, so the packer cuts were taking anywhere from 14-18 hours to cook. In January, I started practicing cooking flats only (Sam's prime); It is a little
trickier; but they come out well. I cook on a UDS with heat diverter, fat side down, until the internal temp reaches about 155-ish, then I wrap in foil (fat side down). When the internal temp hits about 190-ish, I open the top of the wrap and expose the meat to dry out the bark a little. Cook til probe tender.
I cook fat side down to insulate meat from heat source. When I used to cook with an offset smoker, I used the same method, but was fat cap up until I wrapped.

MidnightStokersBBQ
04-05-2013, 11:16 AM
The difference in price is not really a huge concern when you consider how much fat you are removing from a full packer. I like to aggressively trim my packers and by the time I am done there is 5+ lbs of fat discarded. Factor that into the total overall price per pound and they are not that different. I also like the fact that when I pick out a flat I know exactly how thick it is vs a packer where I have to trim away fat and then "discover" how thick the flat is. Like sdmiller above says, they take a little practice and different timings/techniques but they are just as tasty when done right!