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View Full Version : First Brisket Cook. Came out Dry(overcooked?)


BrassGuru
04-01-2013, 09:02 AM
All,
I did my first brisket cook yesterday on a weber otg 22.5". 9 pound packer. I did not touch the brisket, just let it cook until the probe read 190. It took 12 hours, but the brisket came out dry and I think overcooked. I let is rest 1 hour in a cooler. I had a water pan under the meat and the probe was in the middle of the flat. Any ideas?

http://i1353.photobucket.com/albums/q661/Bal_Snow_III/IMG_0159_zpsc0fffaf7.jpg

http://i1353.photobucket.com/albums/q661/Bal_Snow_III/IMG_0160_zps055bc891.jpg

http://i1353.photobucket.com/albums/q661/Bal_Snow_III/IMG_0162_zps3f5c44a7.jpg

DriverWild
04-01-2013, 09:12 AM
Just a suggestion, try wrapping it and adding some moisture inside the foil after you have the color you're looking for next time. Also, try a larger packer. Smaller cuts are harder to keep moist, at least 12 lbs. Good luck!

BrassGuru
04-01-2013, 09:16 AM
Yeah since it was my fist cook I just wanted to leave it alone. I only opened to lid to add charcoal. I will try a larger brisket next time.

Mdboatbum
04-01-2013, 09:39 AM
It was undercooked. See that line of connective tissue right below the fat/bark in the last picture? That's collagen. It holds the meat fibers together. During the cooking process it draws up, toughens and squeezes out all the "moisture" in the meat. Then, at some mysterious point known only to that particular brisket, it melts, loosening up all those meat fibers and producing that ooozy, juicy, unctuous, delicious gelatin that makes properly cooked brisket the stuff of legend and lore.
This is why, if you read more than a couple posts on brisket in this and many other forums, you'll see phrases like "probe tender", "cooked to tenderness", and "probes like butter". It's done when you can stick a toothpick or some other implement in the meat with little or no resistance. If you haven't eaten it all or tossed it, you can still salvage it. Just wrap it in foil with a little beef broth and put it in a 300˚ oven for an hour or so until it probes easily.

Ron_L
04-01-2013, 09:56 AM
Yep... Dry brisket is almost always undercooked. Overcooked brisket falls apart.

ClintHTX
04-01-2013, 10:00 AM
Yep... Dry brisket is almost always undercooked. Overcooked brisket falls apart.

This....also 190 is not super low but I don't start probing mine till 200 or so. Don't know how many times I have heard it but until it probes like butta. I ain't done. The wrap with liquid is pretty good for keeping them moist. And larger packers help also. I normally don't buy anything under 13 lbs.

ClintHTX
04-01-2013, 10:02 AM
And also on probing like butta you have to try different parts of the flat. I don't know how many times one spot I probed was awesome and stuck it a few other places they weren't quite there yet.

BrassGuru
04-01-2013, 10:05 AM
Thanks guys.

aawa
04-01-2013, 11:06 AM
At 190 internal temperature it is undercooked. You can't go by doneness on brisket by internal temperature. Start probing for doneness at 195. Dont be afraid to let the brisket go past 200 IT temperature. The last brisket i did was 13lbs and it finally probed tender at 212 IT.

Daggs
04-01-2013, 11:27 AM
I have never had a brisket probe tender before 202*
The hardest thing about brisket is waiting!

landarc
04-01-2013, 01:17 PM
Brisket Slice Reading:

Take a slice from the middle of the flat. Note how it felt slicing, and how it looks.

If it felt hard or resistant to a sharp knife, clue one for undercooked.

If the meat fibers fuzz up (like your slice) you need a sharper knife, and it is undercooked as well. A dullish knife mashed brisket fibers when they are over-cooked.

If the slice falls apart of cracks in the middle, regardless of moisture, it is overcooked, if it is stiff, and when you bend it, you can see tiny threads of tissue, it is undercooked.

Pull the slices, holding the ends about 1/2" in your fingers. If the meat practically cleaves upon starting, it is overcooked, if it pulls slightly, the splits cleanly, cooked right, if it pulls and you see fibers pulling with the meat, then you are undercooked.

These signs will always be true, no matter how moist or dry the meat is. From there, you can make adjustments with the certainty that you are adjusting in the correct manner.

landarc
04-01-2013, 01:18 PM
oh, BTW, AARRRRGGH! You will never have sharp knives as long as you use a glass cutting board.

Smoothsmoke
04-01-2013, 01:21 PM
At 190 internal temperature it is overcooked. You can't go by doneness on brisket by internal temperature. Start probing for doneness at 195. Dont be afraid to let the brisket go past 200 IT temperature. The last brisket i did was 13lbs and it finally probed tender at 212 IT.

Under*

aawa
04-01-2013, 01:23 PM
Under*

That is what i meant but it came out over for some reason. Stupid multitasking at work!

Bamabuzzard
04-01-2013, 01:25 PM
Yep. Under cooked. If you'd like the recipe for over cooked brisket let me know and I can PM it to you.

HeSmellsLikeSmoke
04-01-2013, 01:28 PM
At 190 internal temperature it is overcooked. You can't go by doneness on brisket by internal temperature. Start probing for doneness at 195. Dont be afraid to let the brisket go past 200 IT temperature. The last brisket i did was 13lbs and it finally probed tender at 212 IT.

Typo of undercooked.

aawa
04-01-2013, 01:32 PM
Its ok, i fixed it now!

Smoothsmoke
04-01-2013, 01:34 PM
I agree with the aforementioned. Looks undercooked to me. I'd still hit it though.

Smoothsmoke
04-01-2013, 01:37 PM
At 190 internal temperature it is undercooked. You can't go by doneness on brisket by internal temperature. Start probing for doneness at 195. Dont be afraid to let the brisket go past 200 IT temperature. The last brisket i did was 13lbs and it finally probed tender at 212 IT.

Agree! A lot of newer folks cant ditch the thermapen, (happened to me too) and start getting worried that the briskky is at 200+ and pull it off early. So yeah, it's done when it's probed tender.

JS-TX
04-01-2013, 01:37 PM
+1 for undercooked. You may also want to try getting a choice or prime packer next time. They are no guarantee but they usually yield a moist brisket.

Bludawg
04-01-2013, 01:42 PM
You need to cook it longer or hotter either way it aint done. See below

BBQ RULES FOR SUCCESS


YOU CAN NOT COOK GREAT BBQ ON A CONSISTENT BASIS BY COOKING TO AN INTERNAL TEMPERATURE OR BY TIME ( XXX MIN PER LB) YOU MUST COOK BY FEEL! For Brisket it must pass the poke test(probe like soft butter) Ribs pass the Bend Test, Pork Butts when the bone wiggles loose. These are the only reliable methods to ensure that your cook will be a success. There is one exception to these rules and that is Poultry which must achieve and internal temp of 170 deg in the thickest part of the thigh and 160 in the breast.

Bamabuzzard
04-01-2013, 01:55 PM
Word of advice from someone who has perfected the over cooked brisket. I've been told by the brethren that "Probe tender" and "like buttah" doesn't mean there is absolutely no resistance.

AustinKnight
04-01-2013, 03:08 PM
Undercooked brotha
What is this pulling off the smoker at 190*? To each his own, I have tried any and every way imaginable and there are only two ways of doing it to me.

I go on absolutely butter feel now days, awhile back I was catching briskets on the way up to tender and holding it in a cambro with the notion that it would continue to cook and when I pull it out it would be tender. This method is inconsistent with 3 out of 5 being undercooked in my test, so what works is cook it to butter leave it wrapped in BP 1)let it cool on the counter tell 150 and slice 2)put it in a cambro/cooler with the door cracked for 30 min then lock it up until people show slice at 150. If you cook it to butter all you have to do is let it rest until IT hits 150 and your good, but first you have to get over IT temps when cooking save those for chicken seriously.

This really is all you need to check for a tender brisket brotha:wink:
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-UdLkH8wuljU/UVJRD3EmSkI/AAAAAAAAME0/FRAvcY7rLvg/s679/IMG_20130326_201513.jpg

caliking
04-01-2013, 08:46 PM
Oi... the trials and travails of trying to cook a moist brisket (speaking of myself here).

Since we're on the subject, and it may be helpful for the OP - I have tried cooking to IT's of 195-210. From landarc's post above, it may have still been undercooked - "...if it is stiff, and when you bend it, you can see tiny threads of tissue, it is undercooked."

For the last one I tried, it went all night, unwrapped about 260-300F, and I started probing once it hit 195 in the flat. The flat probed soft, but not like butter (the point did). I got skittish when the flat hit 210, and still did not probe like the point did i.e. like butter. Coolered for a few hours. The burnt ends came out awesome. The flat was okay - not ooey gooey juicy though.

So for the OP and myself - is it like a switch being flipped where the flat goes from probing kinda soft to "like butter"? Should it feel like the point?

Daggs
04-01-2013, 09:14 PM
You need to cook it longer or hotter either way it aint done. See below

BBQ RULES FOR SUCCESS


YOU CAN NOT COOK GREAT BBQ ON A CONSISTENT BASIS BY COOKING TO AN INTERNAL TEMPERATURE OR BY TIME ( XXX MIN PER LB) YOU MUST COOK BY FEEL! For Brisket it must pass the poke test(probe like soft butter) Ribs pass the Bend Test, Pork Butts when the bone wiggles loose. These are the only reliable methods to ensure that your cook will be a success. There is one exception to these rules and that is Poultry which must achieve and internal temp of 170 deg in the thickest part of the thigh and 160 in the breast.

Not blowing smoke up anyone's a$$ but I have never been misguided by bludawg's advice. It was just a matter of time before he chimed in. I can honestly say my briskets All turn out well from seeing his constant stand behind the above post! Done when its done. That's just the way bbq is.

landarc
04-01-2013, 09:21 PM
In my experience, especially with unwrapped brisket, it is not like a switch, it takes time. Even at the point when things are so close to being done, it is BBQ time. The feel is what can take some time to develop for some. To me, it does feel a lot like the point, it is quite easy to poke.

Bludawg
04-01-2013, 10:05 PM
Oi... the trials and travails of trying to cook a moist brisket (speaking of myself here).

Since we're on the subject, and it may be helpful for the OP - I have tried cooking to IT's of 195-210. From landarc's post above, it may have still been undercooked - "...if it is stiff, and when you bend it, you can see tiny threads of tissue, it is undercooked."

For the last one I tried, it went all night, unwrapped about 260-300F, and I started probing once it hit 195 in the flat. The flat probed soft, but not like butter (the point did). I got skittish when the flat hit 210, and still did not probe like the point did i.e. like butter. Coolered for a few hours. The burnt ends came out awesome. The flat was okay - not ooey gooey juicy though.

So for the OP and myself - is it like a switch being flipped where the flat goes from probing kinda soft to "like butter"? Should it feel like the point?
Due to the lack of marbling compared to the point the flat will not have that uncious mouth feel that you get from the point.

I only check the thickest part if it is right the rest will be too. I look for the butter feel on the pull out not the push in as it can be deceiving.