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tx_hellraiser
03-10-2013, 03:05 PM
I Bought some frenched lamb rack at sams the other night I see that a good internal temp is 130 but i have a few questions i just cant find a answer for.

What kind of rub do you use for lamb Not looking to order a rub i have a ton of spices i can make my own but not sure what would taste good?

Would oak wood be good to smoke?

please make any recommendation as well all info i can get the better

GARNAAL
03-10-2013, 03:35 PM
I Bought some frenched lamb rack at sams the other night I see that a good internal temp is 130 but i have a few questions i just cant find a answer for.

What kind of rub do you use for lamb Not looking to order a rub i have a ton of spices i can make my own but not sure what would taste good?

Would oak wood be good to smoke?

please make any recommendation as well all info i can get the better

rub with some olive oil, chopped Garlic, Salt & pepper and freshly chopped Rosemary..
I use pecan or hickory wood chips to provide a light smokey taste - but not too heavy..

thirdeye
03-10-2013, 03:56 PM
I'm cooking couple of 4-rib racks of lamb tonight too... I think the 130* internal might be the high end for me, but you can cook lamb into the mid 140*'s if that's how you like your meat....

You are wide open when it comes to seasoning, especially if you marinated or plan to mop them during the cook. Even just salt and pepper is good.

Make sure you check for a membrane, and remove it if you find one. I also trim some of the fat on the bone end of the rack. It's not uncommon to have to make a finger wide slice either if they are really fatty. The last thing I do is scrape the bones a bit, and lay out some squares of foil to wrap the bones in.

For wood I like stronger ones, like hickory, oak, or pecan.

caseydog
03-10-2013, 04:11 PM
Make sure to wrap the exposed bones with foil. Don't ask how I know that. :doh:

CD

K-JUN
03-10-2013, 05:18 PM
Rare = 140*
Medium = 160*
Well Done = 170*

Titch
03-10-2013, 05:19 PM
As mentioned keep it simple,Being Frenched you shouldn,t have to play with them too much.Yes cover the bone
Lamb likes to be a nice light pink or it can become chewy fast.130f is a nice temp
Make sure you enjoy

tx_hellraiser
03-10-2013, 06:24 PM
thanks guys

thirdeye
03-10-2013, 09:13 PM
Here is a Kodak moment of my lamb ribs. These were pulled at 120 and 125. The meatballs were a Lebanese recipe we tried for the first time.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v377/thirdeye2/Barbecue%2015/3-10-13019aa.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v377/thirdeye2/Barbecue%2015/3-10-13025aa.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v377/thirdeye2/Barbecue%2015/3-10-13028aaa.jpg

prodano
03-10-2013, 09:46 PM
I'm cooking couple of 4-rib racks of lamb tonight too... I think the 130* internal might be the high end for me, but you can cook lamb into the mid 140*'s if that's how you like your meat....

You are wide open when it comes to seasoning, especially if you marinated or plan to mop them during the cook. Even just salt and pepper is good.

Make sure you check for a membrane, and remove it if you find one. I also trim some of the fat on the bone end of the rack. It's not uncommon to have to make a finger wide slice either if they are really fatty. The last thing I do is scrape the bones a bit, and lay out some squares of foil to wrap the bones in.

For wood I like stronger ones, like hickory, oak, or pecan.

I thought oak and pecan were lighter woods? I usually use 1/2 hickory and 1/2 either apple, cherry, or pecan. Never used oak before. I love using pecan wood because the smoke is absolutely intoxicating, smells so good!

thirdeye
03-10-2013, 09:52 PM
I thought oak and pecan were lighter woods? I usually use 1/2 hickory and 1/2 either apple, cherry, or pecan. Never used oak before. I love using pecan wood because the smoke is absolutely intoxicating, smells so good!

I guess I consider fruit woods as lighter woods,... and the nut woods as heavier than that. Pecan is hickory's little brother and depending on the source, oak is close to hickory.

buccaneer
03-10-2013, 09:55 PM
I Bought some frenched lamb rack at sams the other night I see that a good internal temp is 130 but i have a few questions i just cant find a answer for.

What kind of rub do you use for lamb Not looking to order a rub i have a ton of spices i can make my own but not sure what would taste good?

Would oak wood be good to smoke?

please make any recommendation as well all info i can get the better

I agree, classic is salt pepper, rosemary or thyme, lemon, garlic.
We grew up on lamb, and I would go light on wood but that may be because we grew up on it and treasure the flavour.
Also want to pull at 130f at the latest and put a foil tent over it for ten or more minutes.
The bones MUST be foiled individually, although I sometimes do them for the woofer.

OH, and temps I love best 425f!!!
You render the fatty interior well, get a gorgeous crusty outer and yet a pink and juicy inner!:cool:

prodano
03-10-2013, 10:01 PM
I guess I consider fruit woods as lighter woods,... and the nut woods as heavier than that. Pecan is hickory's little brother and depending on the source, oak is close to hickory.

I understand the logic, thanks for explaining. Although I am an avid backyard bbq'er, I don't have a whole lot of experience with different woods.

tx_hellraiser
03-26-2013, 10:19 AM
I think i will try it this weekend

Just BS
03-26-2013, 10:28 AM
I bought a Mortor & Pestil (hope I spelled that right) just for doing lamb. I combine olive oil, garlic, rosemary, thyme & mint to create a paste. Let it sit for an hour or so.

I pull mine at 135 and give it a good rest under foil.