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Pugi
01-03-2013, 07:48 PM
I have been wanting to do this for awile and I have the go ahead for this weekend. This will be a "stove top" version that does not include the butcher of a pig. Just a trip to your local grocery store for a few simple supplies. Again the whole list is pork meat, lard, and salt. I have cooked this outside in the turkey fryer and inside on the stove top. This weekends version will be on the stove top primarily because its about 10* outside and I'm tired of freezing my baggets off. More to follow with pics of course. Pugi

BobBrisket
01-03-2013, 07:56 PM
Bring it on, Brother!

Garrett
01-03-2013, 08:07 PM
Let the pr0n fly brother!!! I'll take a peek at it.

Boshizzle
01-03-2013, 08:08 PM
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=506&pictureid=6330

Pugi
01-03-2013, 08:16 PM
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=138314

For those who have not seen the real, real way follow the link!!!

bigabyte
01-03-2013, 08:22 PM
I am seriously looking forward to this!:clap:

gtr
01-03-2013, 08:58 PM
Can't wait brother! :whoo:

MisterChrister
01-03-2013, 09:23 PM
Hit me, I'm open!!!

Pugi
01-03-2013, 09:36 PM
A word of advise, this won't be nearly as cool as the first thread. It will however show that anyone can make a darn good carnitas at home. It's so easy, even a brethren can do it!

chicagokp
01-03-2013, 09:38 PM
I just did stovetop carnitas. Looking forward to see where I can improve!!

Pugi
01-03-2013, 10:40 PM
I just did stovetop carnitas. Looking forward to see where I can improve!!

Maybe later you can point out differences between mine and yours so we can all learn?

fantomlord
01-03-2013, 11:47 PM
you're such a tease :mmph:

RevZiLLa
01-04-2013, 01:57 AM
Salivating!

Lupus
01-04-2013, 03:52 AM
Looking forwards to this.

Showed the boss the other thread and was immediately shut down when she found out it was cooked in lard.

Shooter1
01-04-2013, 07:13 AM
Bring it brother, can't wait. The first carnitas post was epic.

Fire_Mgmt
01-04-2013, 09:33 AM
^^^couldnt agree more. The first carnitas post was one of the best I've seen on this site. I've bookmarked that thread just so I could show my friends what kind of cookout I'd like to do someday.

Smoothsmoke
01-04-2013, 10:17 AM
si se puede!

Mattmo
01-04-2013, 10:25 AM
Come on already! ha ha! Just kidding. I just read the "real" carnitas where you showed everything except the living pig and THOROUGHLY enjoyed it. I am really looking forward to this. I have a bunch of lard and a bunch of hog in the freezer and want to try this.....:pop2:

chicagokp
01-04-2013, 11:32 AM
Maybe later you can point out differences between mine and yours so we can all learn?

You bet. Mine are simple. Pork butt in a cast iron Dutch. Simmered in water and salt till fork tender and then I let the water steam out. Then I let the remainder fry up in some lard and the fat that renders out.

Here are my lunch leftovers. Seasoned up with cilantro, squeeze of lime and some Valentina picante hot sauce.

74156

74157

These ended up more shredded that I wanted but the crispy bits are the best.

Pugi
01-04-2013, 04:17 PM
You bet. Mine are simple. Pork butt in a cast iron Dutch. Simmered in water and salt till fork tender and then I let the water steam out. Then I let the remainder fry up in some lard and the fat that renders out.

Here are my lunch leftovers. Seasoned up with cilantro, squeeze of lime and some Valentina picante hot sauce.

74156

74157

These ended up more shredded that I wanted but the crispy bits are the best.

They look good! I've never heard of cooking it in water before. Probably a little more healthy. I'm headed to the store tonight and will cook it tomorrow. I'll post pics as time allows.

chicagokp
01-04-2013, 04:43 PM
I just braise in salt water before I finish it in lard.

Pugi
01-05-2013, 11:59 AM
I really wanted to cook this outside in the Brethren way but I have cold to the bone for the last couple weeks and with temps like this well, I made an executive decision, indoors and warm.

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/01/06/2uqa8y4e.jpg

Pugi
01-05-2013, 12:18 PM
One thing I have learned that Brethren are not only meat experts but chili experts and bean experts. Today I am making refried beans from scratch to go with carnitas so I thought I would show the process. The pinto beans were soaked in water over night then rinsed well with fresh water. To those I added about 10 cloves of garlic and a jumbo onion chopped into large pieces. Garlic and onion are for flavor and will be removed before smashing. This is all thrown into crock pot and cooked until beans are well done, almost overdone.

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/01/06/yvy9unyb.jpg

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/01/06/ene8azuh.jpg

Pugi
01-05-2013, 01:09 PM
Now on to the main course. 2 of the 3 ingredients, lard and pork. The lard is bought at store and is usually white in color. This is some lard that we had left over from the real carnitas original thread. That is why it has a tan color when in solid form.
http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/01/06/4ase4yry.jpg

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/01/06/pe2yra4a.jpg

Pugi
01-05-2013, 01:22 PM
This part I like to do on the kettle but because of freezing cold temps I am doing inside. Normally I would seer over hot coals, today in a very hot pan with a little lard. Try and seer as much as possible by turning. Notice I'm not afraid to get a little char on it. This step replaces the one in original thread that we heated the lard up to smoking point and then seered each hunk of meat in hot lard.
http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/01/06/7yna8uva.jpg
http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/01/06/vytetegu.jpg

Pugi
01-05-2013, 01:24 PM
These are boneless pork shoulders and the total weight was about 11 pounds.

Pugi
01-05-2013, 01:39 PM
Melting the lard in turkey fryer pot on stove. Jeez I need to get a nice 4 gallon pot. It was just to much for the 2 gallon.
http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/01/06/asatatat.jpg

Pugi
01-05-2013, 02:07 PM
The pork placed into lard, you want the lard to have a slow bubble and no more, we are not deep frying French fries here. Slow, lazy bubbles. The foam is from liquids coming out of pork and will soon stop after excess is gone. The pic is deceiving, the meat is almost covered by lard.
http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/01/06/8e6umata.jpg

RevZiLLa
01-05-2013, 02:10 PM
Keep it coming, Pugi!

coyotero
01-05-2013, 02:15 PM
Vamos Pugi, si se puede.

JV

chingador
01-05-2013, 02:20 PM
awesomeness all around. Nice work Pugi. Cannot wait to see the finished pics. Homemade refried beans are the business. I am hoping you are going to use lard for the refrieds too.

Pugi
01-05-2013, 03:01 PM
awesomeness all around. Nice work Pugi. Cannot wait to see the finished pics. Homemade refried beans are the business. I am hoping you are going to use lard for the refrieds too.

You know I will, being we are on the subject of lard, our practice is to freeze it once then toss it out. So you get 2 cooks of carnitas out of it. Make lard and cook, freeze, thaw and cook, toss it. Reasoning is it gets to many impurities in it for long term storage after that. We would rather be safe then dead.

Pugi
01-05-2013, 03:07 PM
I wanted to show this pic, the lard now has a cream color to it. This is from all the liquids the meat is producing. As the cook progresses this will burn off and the lard will return to a amber color.
http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/01/06/uzudupab.jpg

chingador
01-05-2013, 03:29 PM
Looking good. I know I have said this on another thread, but in Houston, a couple of Mexican restaurants that are known for their carnitas do it a little different. The slow roast a whole shoulder, than cube it up and deep fry in lard. It is really good. I am sure it is nothing like what you are doing, but pork fried in lard in any form or fashion cannot be too bad.

Pugi
01-05-2013, 03:44 PM
Looking good. I know I have said this on another thread, but in Houston, a couple of Mexican restaurants that are known for their carnitas do it a little different. The slow roast a whole shoulder, than cube it up and deep fry in lard. It is really good. I am sure it is nothing like what you are doing, but pork fried in lard in any form or fashion cannot be too bad.

That sounds typical for restaurant style. They fry in lard to make it taste authentic. I've been to restaurants that serve so called carnitas that's never been touched by lard, I can tell by taste and its not a good taste. Authentic is the total cook in lard.

chingador
01-05-2013, 03:48 PM
Yeah totally. I do like the restaurant style though. You get the crispy crust all around. I cringe when people throw pork in a crock pot with liquid mad call it carnitas. Kind of like what the burrito chain calls barbacoa. Not even close

Pugi
01-05-2013, 03:52 PM
Dang I forgot to post earlier, the total cook time is about 3 to 4 hours depending how thick the meat is. Traditionally carnitas is served with pickled peppers not salsa. Today I'm serving with pickled peppers and a kicked up guacumole, its basically a guacumole and pico de gallo mix.http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/01/06/ary5ysej.jpg

Pugi
01-05-2013, 05:34 PM
The meat is fall apart ready. Time for the 3rd ingredient, salt. I put about 2 heaping tablespoons in glass and diluted with hot water. Then poured that into the bubbling lard. I'll give that about 15 minutes to get it in the meat and it will be complete. So total ingredients, meat, lard and salt.

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/01/06/mymabuty.jpg

Pugi
01-05-2013, 06:07 PM
Here it is!!! I pulled it out of the lard. You can see some broke in half just getting it out. It is very tender. For comparison it will be easier to fall apart then pulled pork. I'll try and post plating pics later. Company is coming over for dinner and I have to shift my focus to them.

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/01/06/tynyrejy.jpg

coyotero
01-05-2013, 07:26 PM
Compa Pugi;

Te salieron ATM.

JV

chriscw81
01-05-2013, 08:02 PM
Pugi, you should get a trophy for your carnitas threads!!!! :clap: :hail:

Pugi
01-06-2013, 01:11 AM
Let's not forget the beans!!! Hot lard in pan and the little lady grating onion into it. We let the onions soften then added whole cooked pinto beans. Cooked it all together for 15 minutes then smashed by hand.
http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/01/06/qy9e7ame.jpg

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/01/06/ypujagu2.jpg

Pugi
01-06-2013, 01:13 AM
Finally a plated pic.
http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/01/06/nu4yge7y.jpg

Pugi
01-06-2013, 01:17 AM
And my first bite. It turned out perfect. Everyone was pleased and had great compliments. All in all a wonderful meal. Plenty of left overs for later. I'm done for the night and will fill in the blanks tomorrow. Pugi
http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/01/06/y2yqyvuq.jpg

goodscotch
01-06-2013, 07:39 AM
Being from California we don't have the opportunity to do a whole pig. I've always done the stove version. Question? I've always put sliced oranges in mine. Why don't you, if you don't mind me asking?

Pugi
01-06-2013, 02:16 PM
Being from California we don't have the opportunity to do a whole pig. I've always done the stove version. Question? I've always put sliced oranges in mine. Why don't you, if you don't mind me asking?


That would be from a different region of Mexico, my recipe is traditional from Michoacan area. I have also heard of adding milk some how. Think of it this way, where did Bbq start? How has it changed from it original form? Well carnitas started in Michoacan and this (or the first thread) is its original form. That is why you travel all over Mexico and see restaurants that advertise carnitas de Michoacan.

RevZiLLa
01-06-2013, 04:07 PM
I am SOOOOOO hungry now!

BobBrisket
01-06-2013, 04:14 PM
I can add a bit about the oranges if Pugi doesn't mind. I couldn't tell you what is authentic to a specific region like Pugi can. My grandfather was from Delicias, MX. All of the stuff we do and the wqay we do it, we learned from him. One idea behind adding the juice from fresh oranges is to do so at the very end of the cook. The idea is to get the sugars in the orange to "carmelize" and add some color. The bad part is that if you add too much or add it at the wrong time, the sugars burn and you get that burned taste on the meat. Around here, the mom and pop shops sell their version of carnitas which are 3-4 square chunks of pork that are deep fried. The outside is crispy and basically you tear off/shred em and go from there. Pugi is right, every region adds their own touch to it.
Here's how we like to do it:
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=57288&highlight=processing

Pugi
01-06-2013, 04:53 PM
Bob, awesome thread!!! I know for me, part of the fun is family and friends. I cannot wait for warmer months to do this again. As for the addition of different items, I would love to try some with oranges. Unfortunately I don't know anyone that makes it that way.