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View Full Version : What is APL talking about?!?!


MeatyOakerSmoker
08-03-2012, 10:04 AM
Hello

I was reading this Adam Perry Lang recipe (http://www.rachaelrayshow.com/food/recipes/adam-perry-langs-man-steak-thyme-zinfandel-sauce/) (please excuse the fact that it's on a Rachel Ray website) when I got to this line:
And, if the crust is cooking too quickly, you can move the grilling surface farther from the fire (see the techniques described in High and Slow, page 58).

High and Slow? What's he talking about? I tried to find a book by that name or anything at all and nothing came up on Google. So naturally I came to the brethren's help.

Thanks
Sam

Pitmaster T
08-03-2012, 10:19 AM
That would mean raising the grill higher, thus farther from the heat, thus slower.

BBQ Grail
08-03-2012, 11:13 AM
The technique is explain in his new book Charred & Scruffed.

You can see it here:

http://youtu.be/6Knf4NVJjqc

http://youtu.be/BAl58EVZOq0

landarc
08-03-2012, 11:32 AM
That technique is very close to what I was taught for Santa Maria tri-tip, cooking over direct fire but, much higher than most folks think. It works great.


And who, other than me, would kill for one of those bones?

PitRow
08-03-2012, 11:51 AM
Really? Beating a rib roast with a baseball bat until it looks like it's been run over by a dump truck? No thanks.

MeatyOakerSmoker
08-03-2012, 12:42 PM
And who, other than me, would kill for one of those bones?

Me! Me! I would... but I'm like Jimmy I don't want it cooked...

Thanks for the replies... I don't see how I can achieve this "high" thing on my 22.5" Weber grill This guy is cooking on some sort of monster grill.

jasonjax
08-03-2012, 01:25 PM
Really? Beating a rib roast with a baseball bat until it looks like it's been run over by a dump truck? No thanks.


Actually, I'm kind of curous to try that now. I am wondering if that intense of a smac-down on a good piece of beef would cause some extra cellular/tissue break down thus making it more tender. Very interesting.

42BBQ
08-03-2012, 01:31 PM
I've tried his recipes, eaten in his restaurant, and personally seen the trophies (like first place pork American Royal Invitational). If APL says beat the heII out a giant piece of beef before cooking, I say why not try it lol

landarc
08-03-2012, 01:32 PM
Me! Me! I would... but I'm like Jimmy I don't want it cooked...

Thanks for the replies... I don't see how I can achieve this "high" thing on my 22.5" Weber grill This guy is cooking on some sort of monster grill.

Nothing you can't make, using a second grate, maybe from a Smokey Joe, some threaded rods and a few big washers and nuts. I see it as totally doable.

bigabyte
08-03-2012, 01:39 PM
I used to cook high and slow all the time in my younger, wilder days.

jasonjax
08-03-2012, 01:52 PM
I used to cook high and slow all the time in my younger, wilder days.

Good one! Thank God beer is legal is all I can say.

Pitmaster T
08-03-2012, 03:45 PM
High is and slow is also a technique for poozling a poozle.

5string
08-03-2012, 03:46 PM
Easily done on a Santa Maria type grill.

MeatyOakerSmoker
08-03-2012, 03:50 PM
Easily done on a Santa Maria type grill.

Do you want my wife to kill me?!? Don't put ideas in my head! :fear:

SchatzSea
08-03-2012, 03:55 PM
Nothing you can't make, using a second grate, maybe from a Smokey Joe, some threaded rods and a few big washers and nuts. I see it as totally doable.

6 bricks (3 per side) and an extra grate and you're running' "high" on a Weber kettle - APL rocks!

Sent from my Incredible (2) Droid....Tech rocks when it works!

pmad
08-03-2012, 05:21 PM
I'm reading his book now.

I must say, I like some of his ideas, but I'm not sold on all of them.

The herb brush -- I don't know where he gets his herbs, but that brush would easily cost me $10-$15.

I'm not spending an extra $10-15 every time I grill.

In fact, spending the $10-15 on prime vs choice is going to add far more flavor than some herb brush.

I do like his board dressing and salts.
I think his "clenched" bit is far more trouble than it is worth.

tish
08-03-2012, 05:33 PM
I'm reading his book now.

I must say, I like some of his ideas, but I'm not sold on all of them.

The herb brush -- I don't know where he gets his herbs, but that brush would easily cost me $10-$15.

I'm not spending an extra $10-15 every time I grill.

In fact, spending the $10-15 on prime vs choice is going to add far more flavor than some herb brush.

I do like his board dressing and salts.
I think his "clenched" bit is far more trouble than it is worth.

You could try growing your own herbs to cut down on the expense. Just a thought. :wink:

AZScott
08-03-2012, 06:17 PM
So he beat the piece of meat to increase surface area right? Why wouldn't he just cut 1-1.5" thick steaks or between the bones and increase the surface area even more? On the other hand, if he's doing it purely to be able to grill a large cut of meat without burning the outside, his technique makes sense since it would be just like taking a mallet to a chicken breast, pork chop that will be sauteed.

landarc
08-03-2012, 07:30 PM
I think the real effect has more to do with breaking up the fibers and connective tissue, the internal surface area changes.

SmokeFan
08-03-2012, 09:31 PM
I'm reading his book now.

I must say, I like some of his ideas, but I'm not sold on all of them.

The herb brush -- I don't know where he gets his herbs, but that brush would easily cost me $10-$15.

I'm not spending an extra $10-15 every time I grill.

In fact, spending the $10-15 on prime vs choice is going to add far more flavor than some herb brush.

I do like his board dressing and salts.
I think his "clenched" bit is far more trouble than it is worth.

I've done the herb brush once, and it did cost about $10 to make. But we were entertaining for a larger group, and it was a neat novelty sort of thing. Chopping the tips up into the board dressing also added an extra layer of flavor. Having said that, I've done other cooks from or adapted from Charred and Scruffed, and just used a normal ole basting brush. I think it's something I'll do again, but certainly not on every cook.

Hook_Line_and_Sinker
08-03-2012, 10:47 PM
Looks like a totally awesome way to do it, by watching the posted videos! As Landarc pointed out, it would break down the fibers making tender, and as APL said it would also intensify the favors.

Difinately got to try this!

MeatyOakerSmoker
08-03-2012, 10:58 PM
You could try growing your own herbs to cut down on the expense. Just a thought. :wink:

Growing herbs is a pain in the neck... my guess is that's why they cost so much

landarc
08-03-2012, 11:13 PM
Nope. We used to supply cut flowers to supermarkets, the real cost is in loss, the cut herbs immediately start to fade, if you do not sell them in a day or two, you eat the cost. You just cannot sell enough to lower the margin appreciably.

Pitmaster T
08-03-2012, 11:21 PM
Woodpellet mod

APL is the most the one great. Believe un fortitude Cadillac quicken you convert come room here this. Like the redwings that come from undrilled jackalopes when his Sumo removes maxipads from the armpits of yore.

TonyT
08-04-2012, 02:02 PM
Really? Beating a rib roast with a baseball bat until it looks like it's been run over by a dump truck? No thanks.

A bit theatrical, but I use the same scuffing idea with potatoes when I do a roast in the oven. I'll parboil, shake it around a little in the colander to scuff them and toss them under whatever I'm roasting in the oven. When they come out, the outsides have this wonderful crunchy texture and the insides are nice and soft.
I wouldn't use a baseball bat, but I can understand what he's trying to do. Think of those nice charred bits on the outside of a medium well steak.

pmad
08-05-2012, 05:48 PM
Growing herbs is a pain in the neck... my guess is that's why they cost so much

I tried this summer.
Wrong summer to try and grow herbs.

MeatyOakerSmoker
08-05-2012, 10:20 PM
It's always the wrong summer. They're fickle beasts.