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BillywannaQ
08-02-2012, 11:54 PM
So, there are many of us that cook with wood, charcoal, or gas (with wood flavor)and electricity. So is there a difference between these four combustion methods? How do you all think it affects the taste of the final product, if it does?

landarc
08-03-2012, 12:01 AM
From a pure science point of view, heat is heat, it does not matter what the source is. There are differences in terms of radian, convection and conductive heating, but, in the end, heat is heat, radiation is radiation.

Now, there are differences in that each method creates by-products and other effects that can add or detract from cooking and food. This is true for all cooking, not just cooking over wood. Most professional bakers of pasties and cakes will choose electric over gas, as gas is a moister heat, it is hard to control that moisture. Electric is a dry heat, you can add moisture very precisely. Hence, most controlled heating in science is not done electrically.

In the same way, burning wood, burning charcoal and burning gas will each have different advantages and disadvantages. In the end, I think if you give a very skilled cook any piece of equipment, he can produce great food, and I suspect, indistinguishable one from the other if tasted truly blind.

shirknwrk
08-03-2012, 12:13 AM
Charcoal will produce 700° easily in a ceramic kamado. I "pegged" my 1000° true tell several times (and ruined it). It goes fast at those temps but it's fun to watch flames shoot a foot out of the top of my Egg's chimney when I do a cleaning burn.

Mo-Dave
08-03-2012, 12:17 AM
That is exactly what I was about to say. :wink:
Dave

Butt Rubb'n BBQ
08-03-2012, 12:22 AM
Ok guess I was wrong. You learn something every day. Never cooked on a egg I have a stick burner and lit a whole bag of coal and never went over 150

Ty_
08-03-2012, 12:28 AM
I heard propane has the best flavor.

http://kingofthehill.download-tvshows.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/Hank-Hill.jpeg

Jethro608
08-03-2012, 12:45 AM
Ok guess I was wrong. You learn something every day. Never cooked on a egg I have a stick burner and lit a whole bag of coal and never went over 150

Something wrong with that picture!!, no air flow or????? Can light 12 coals & get better than that on my cos. Anyway sounds defective stop useing it.. mail it c o d & ill check it out for you:sly: I'll pm you my address

Jethro608
08-03-2012, 12:49 AM
Oh yea while I'm checking it out. If you go with the propane & propane assoriese you will be fine:D:D:D:D

El Ropo
08-03-2012, 01:56 AM
Ok guess I was wrong. You learn something every day. Never cooked on a egg I have a stick burner and lit a whole bag of coal and never went over 150

:eusa_clap:twitch::tape: Thermo check?

J'ville Grill
08-03-2012, 02:51 AM
Deleted

CarolinaQue
08-03-2012, 08:47 AM
Ok guess I was wrong. You learn something every day. Never cooked on a egg I have a stick burner and lit a whole bag of coal and never went over 150


Sounds like either you have so much mass that one bag of charcoal can't heat it all or you have an air flow issue that isn't getting the charcoal to burn as hot as it can/should. You have any pics of your set up? I have found that the best thing for large offsets is wood for heat.

shirknwrk
08-03-2012, 09:19 AM
Too late to edit... It's a Tel-Tru, not a Tru Tel

Jethro608
08-03-2012, 09:48 AM
Put probe in glass of ice with ( little ) water should read 32 then put in pan of water bring to boil should read 212 depending where you live make adjustments from there

5string
08-03-2012, 10:21 AM
I believe there is a difference in heat sources as far as byproducts. Electricity of course is the cleanest heat source, but burning any "fuel" gives off byproducts. These can be in the form of hyrdocarbons (unburned fuel) or carbon monoxide (incompletely burned fuel). While both of these are generaly associated with combustion, they do occur in the burning of wood and charcoal which is a wood product for the most part. A clean heat source will be nearly invisible, while there will be some opacity (smoke) present in the exhaust when there are byproducts.
These byproducts can change the flavor of the food being cooked by absorbtion into it. This is proven by the fact that we use different woods to obtain different flavors when we smoke. There is further proof that even a well seasoned gasser grill cannot produce the same smoke flavor without introducing smoke with the use of a smoke box.
So all in all, it is my opinion for what it's worth, that while heat is in fact heat, because of the way WE cook there IS a difference.