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View Full Version : Brining/Spatchcock help


JMSetzler
08-02-2012, 09:44 PM
I'm gonna brine a chicken for the first time. I'm gonna brine it overnight and cook it sometime tomorrow. Should I spatchcock it first or wait until after it's brined?

cirk
08-02-2012, 09:47 PM
Makes for a smaller bag if you cut it up first.

Ron_L
08-02-2012, 09:48 PM
I don't think it really matters. Might be easier to get into a bag if it is whole.

dadsr4
08-03-2012, 10:10 AM
I spatchcock first, then brine. That way you get the mess over with, the brine has better access to the meat, plus you don't end up brining parts that just go into the trash.

gtr
08-03-2012, 10:43 AM
I split it first. Seems to be easier to deal with getting it in & out of the brine, plus it's one less thing to do on the day of the cook if it's already split.

Will there be pron? :hungry:

bobaftt
08-03-2012, 11:05 AM
that seems like a really long time in brine for a chicken...

Jaskew82
08-03-2012, 11:20 AM
that seems like a really long time in brine for a chicken...

I was thinking the same thing. Whole chicken cut up should only need 4 hours. 6 at the most.

Bbqin fool
08-03-2012, 11:30 AM
I spatchcock first and then brine. Only ever brined my birds for four hours. Never tried over night. Good luck! Looking forward to seeing the finished product!

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gtr
08-03-2012, 11:34 AM
I normally brine overnight. That's with a 1/4 kosher salt (I never brine with regular salt) to a gallon of water ratio and I never get overly salty chix. I definitely get the chix out of the brine and rinse well in the morning.

I wouldn't use a commercial brine mix for that long though - seems like that stuff has a heavier salt content, which is why I like to have it around for when I don't plan ahead (KC Game Changer is great stuff btw!).

Teleking
08-03-2012, 12:25 PM
I was thinking the same thing. Whole chicken cut up should only need 4 hours. 6 at the most.

Spatchcock does not = cut up :wink:

gtr
08-03-2012, 12:29 PM
Spatchcock does not = cut up :wink:

Good point - I'd never brine pieces overnight - just a few hours for those.

BBQ Grail
08-03-2012, 12:34 PM
I brine whole, because it's easier to get in the bag and fits better in the fridge. I put the bird in the brine when I go to work and cook it when I get home.

jfletcher84
08-03-2012, 12:37 PM
I spatchcock before I brine it is just easier for me that way. My rule of thumb for brining is about 1 hour per pound of bird. 5 pound bird 5 hours. I tried brining over night once. It was so farking salty I couldnt eat it.

Myrdhyn
08-03-2012, 12:43 PM
I brine whole, because it's easier to get in the bag and fits better in the fridge. I put the bird in the brine when I go to work and cook it when I get home.

It really isn't going to effect the results of the brine itself whether it's whole or spatched. It boils down to what is more convenient for you. You can do it first and get the mess out of the way, or maybe you're brining in say....a bus-tub and you can get more chix in with them flat. Alternatively, maybe you're brining in a freezer bag and it'll be much easier to get in there whole.

Coldholler
08-03-2012, 02:01 PM
Don't brine overnight! It'll be way too salty. Good direction about how long to brine already on this thread. I never spatchcock, because I like the presentation of a whole chicken (and I can fit a couple of dozen in my smoker). But be sure you rinse the brine off/out before you cook, especially if you'll make soup from the leftovers.

JS-TX
08-03-2012, 02:09 PM
JM, I wouldn't brine longer than 8 hours, depending on how salty your brine is. My normal brine is 1 cup kosher salt and 1 cup light brown sugar + other ingredients per gallon of water. If those other ingredients don't have much salt you should be ok for 8 hours or so. Make sure you swish your brine bags around to get even coverage and rinse before you cook em'. Do you know what you plan on brining them with? I also agree Oakridge game changer is some good stuff.

Scubadoo97
08-03-2012, 03:22 PM
Time in brine all depends on concentration of the brine. This should be specified and not assumed in most cases.

JMSetzler
08-03-2012, 03:47 PM
They have been in the brine for about an hour now (345pm EDT) and I plan to brine it for 4-5 hours or so. I mixed up a quart of water, 1/4 cup sea salt, 1/4 cup brown sugar, 2 tbsp worcestershire sauce, 2 tsp onion powder and 2 tsp garlic powder and put it all in a ziploc bag. When I'm ready to cook it, I'm gonna take it out of the brine, rinse it down, pat it dry, spatchcock it, and toss it on the kettle grill to cook over indirect heat with some apple wood chunks. Not sure what temp I'll cook it at... just wherever the grill settles in between 300-400 degrees until its done. I'll probably mix up a seasoning of salt, pepper, and fresh thyme to stuff up under the skin...

NBBD
08-03-2012, 05:15 PM
Not sure where my brine came from... I brine overnight, rinse and it never lets me down We get local raised fresh poultry... Good by itself but awesome with brine, Pheasants do well in it also

1 cup hot water, add kosher until it measure 1 1/2

Add 1/2 c Sugar

Mix in 1 gallon of COLD water

Some garlic cloves, black pepper

Add a few other seasonings if you wish

Bbqin fool
08-03-2012, 05:33 PM
You're on the right track there JM. Keep it up!

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Swine Spectator
08-03-2012, 05:51 PM
It's all about the concentration. I use 1 Cup kosher salt to 1 gallon of water. I use it for whole or cut up. I have no problems leaving overnight or even two. It reaches a state of equilibrium.

David
The Swine Spectator