PDA

View Full Version : Quick sear before you smoke?


Trumpstylz
07-26-2012, 04:12 PM
Do you guys do this? And if so, is it in a pan or on the grill?

Igotgas
07-26-2012, 04:14 PM
I do not do it. As I understand it, searing seals the meat and I want the smoke to penetrate.

Enkidu
07-26-2012, 04:20 PM
I have been using the reverse sear since reading Moose's tutorial. Smoke first, sear at the end.

Cack
07-26-2012, 04:23 PM
I do not do it. As I understand it, searing seals the meat and I want the smoke to penetrate.

What he said ... I wouldn't expect you'd get a lot of smoke flavor if you seared before

Bludawg
07-26-2012, 04:29 PM
Ive been know to sear a brisket a time or two:rolleyes:
http://i968.photobucket.com/albums/ae164/Bludawg51/DSCN0640.jpg


Originally Posted by Igotgas
I do not do it. As I understand it, searing seals the meat and I want the smoke to penetrate.

What he said ... I wouldn't expect you'd get a lot of smoke flavor if you seared before
__________________
I can tell you your both totally wrong in your thinking.

Moose
07-26-2012, 04:57 PM
Searing your meat first will create a "seal" that will make it difficult for smoke to penetrate very far into the meat, not to mention significant moisture loss, so I do not recommend this.

I go into greater detail about this in my reverse sear tutorial HERE (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=136959).

deguerre
07-26-2012, 04:59 PM
Ive been know to sear a brisket a time or two:rolleyes:
http://i968.photobucket.com/albums/ae164/Bludawg51/DSCN0640.jpg





I think my beard just got singed...

Moose
07-26-2012, 05:00 PM
I think my beard just got singed...

Didn't you just shave?

:becky:

Enkidu
07-26-2012, 05:01 PM
Ive been know to sear a brisket a time or two:rolleyes:
http://i968.photobucket.com/albums/ae164/Bludawg51/DSCN0640.jpg



I can tell you your both totally wrong in your thinking.

Now THAT is some serious HnF Q'ing!

cliffcarter
07-26-2012, 05:18 PM
Search "SmokyOkie Brisket", he's seared them for awhile.

Bludawg
07-26-2012, 09:21 PM
Search "SmokyOkie Brisket", he's seared them for awhile.

That is where that perticular brisket was headed. One of the tastiest briskets you will ever cook

Trumpstylz
07-26-2012, 10:30 PM
How is reverse sear different from hot n fast or plain ole smoking?

MilitantSquatter
07-26-2012, 10:41 PM
I could have sworn that there were at least two regarded food science experts that conducted experiments that showed that moisture content of seared meat did not actually retain more moisture or "seal" anything in (after all, meat is mainly water, and pourous)... seems like a nice concept and one that gets tossed around here a lot but this is probably more so based on what they heard/read from someone else rather than actual concrete proof....


can't find the names though... anyone recall ?

Moose
07-26-2012, 10:46 PM
I could have sworn that there were at least two regarded food science experts that conducted experiments that showed that moisture content of seared meat did not actually retain more moisture or "seal" anything in (after all, meat is mainly water, and pourous)... seems like a nice concept and one that gets tossed around here a lot but this is probably more so based on what they heard/read from someone else rather than actual concrete proof....


can't find the names though... anyone recall ?

America's Test Kitchen and Alton Brown both demonstrated the traditional "sear first" method resulted in greater moisture loss...I mention it more in detail in my reverse seal tutorial a few posts above.

cliffcarter
07-27-2012, 06:26 AM
America's Test Kitchen and Alton Brown both demonstrated the traditional "sear first" method resulted in greater moisture loss...I mention it more in detail in my reverse seal tutorial a few posts above.

The sear test done at America's Test Kitchen showed no difference in moisture loss between seared and unseared meat. The reason for searing meat is to add flavor, whether done first or last is a personal preference.

http://shine.yahoo.com/shine-food/beware-meat-myths-150000645.html

buccaneer
07-27-2012, 07:10 AM
I could have sworn that there were at least two regarded food science experts that conducted experiments that showed that moisture content of seared meat did not actually retain more moisture or "seal" anything in (after all, meat is mainly water, and pourous)... seems like a nice concept and one that gets tossed around here a lot but this is probably more so based on what they heard/read from someone else rather than actual concrete proof....


can't find the names though... anyone recall ?

You are right and it is worldwide.
You can't seal meat, yet the myth continues.
Same as moisture/ liquid used to braise prevents drying, it's bs.
The liquid becomes the drying agent as it is now the medium for heat delivery and the water and fat molecules depart into the cooking liquid.

Escoffier discovered "reverse sear" and wrote chapters on it some 70 years age, but he didn't call it "reverse sear".
It's translated French to English as bake and brown or brown and bake.
The positives are tight control of done ness, slightly meatier flavor due to an effect similar to dry aging during the slow process.
However, the low cooking temp duration allows less development of flavonoids.
A rare meat cooked fast on high heat beats it for flavour( blind taste tests) and by a big margin IMO.
Chicken thighs go well brown and baked.
This is the wonderful thing about cooking, there are so many ways to get a delicious result!
References who you may have heard talking about this are McGee or This- Herve
And there's a Spanish guy whose name evades me ATM

troytime
07-27-2012, 11:53 AM
Escoffier discovered "reverse sear" and wrote chapters on it some 70 years age, but he didn't call it "reverse sear".
It's translated French to English as bake and brown or brown and bake.


Thank you!
I get a little nauseated everytime i see the credit go to that Finney guy.

buccaneer
07-27-2012, 08:15 PM
Thank you!
I get a little nauseated everytime i see the credit go to that Finney guy.
So do I which I am embarrassed to admit:laugh:
I didn't know where the term "reverse sear' had come from until recently, finally I had someone to blame!:wink:

troytime
07-27-2012, 09:50 PM
So do I which I am embarrassed to admit:laugh:
I didn't know where the term "reverse sear' had come from until recently, finally I had someone to blame!:wink:

Maybe that Finney guy came up with the 'reverse sear' - which is actually a misnomer.

cliffcarter
07-28-2012, 02:20 PM
Maybe that Finney guy came up with the 'reverse sear' - which is actually a misnomer.

As is "pre-burn".:-D

Allegry
07-28-2012, 03:03 PM
I'm glad to see people in here dispelling the myth that searing creates any kind of "seal" on the meat. Searing will have zero effect on moisture retention or smoke adherence and adsorption.

MS2SB
07-28-2012, 03:19 PM
Wouldn't a reverse sear technically revert the surface of the meat to its original or pre-seared state? Perhaps Late sear or finishing sear would be more appropriate terms?

Sent from my SGH-i917 using Board Express

buccaneer
07-28-2012, 06:22 PM
I'm sticking with bake'n brown as the term....unless I don't :decision:

BTW, this isn't a one camp versus another deal.
Bake 'n brown is a great method and as such should be among your arsenal of techniques.

Equipping yourself with all the methods you can and finding the best uses for them is our goal.
I'm just trying to be helpful filling in the gaps is all.
:clap: Go bro's