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View Full Version : Liquid Smoke: Does It Work?


Kaita
07-25-2012, 11:48 AM
Does adding some drops of liquid smoke in an aluminum pan really infuse flavor onto chicken? The question would go for filling an aluminum pan with beer or wine. Or does the liquid simply just keep the chicken from drying out?

gtr
07-25-2012, 12:06 PM
I don't think you'll find a lot of fans of liquid smoke here. IMO the best smoke flavor comes from clean burning wood.

As for keeping chicken moist, I haven't found it necessary to introduce liquid into the cooking process. I do normally brine, however, then spatchcock (don't know if you're familiar with the term, but it basically means butterfly) and cook anywhere from 300-350 or even more until 'till 165 in the thigh. No problem with dried out chicken. :thumb:

Phubar
07-25-2012, 12:15 PM
If your chicken is pulled off at the right temp you don't need no liquid(smoke)....it will turn out moist.
And if you're using smokewood you don't need no liquid smoke....but if you don't use smokewood you still don't need no liquid smoke.
Probably the liquid smoke does add Phlavour but I don't think you want that particular Phlavour.

Lake Dogs
07-25-2012, 12:16 PM
I think you lost him at "spatchcock"....

Lake Dogs
07-25-2012, 12:18 PM
Does adding some drops of liquid smoke in an aluminum pan really infuse flavor onto chicken? The question would go for filling an aluminum pan with beer or wine. Or does the liquid simply just keep the chicken from drying out?

Chicken is delicate. It will absorb flavors quickly. When smoking foul of any kind people that are successful at it smoke it... gently.

Does liquid smoke infuse flavor in chicken? I dont know, I'd never do it, but I'm sure it would, if that's the flavor you want in it. Same for wine or beer, or most anything else.

Garyclaw
07-25-2012, 12:58 PM
Yes.

Garyclaw
07-25-2012, 01:00 PM
^^^I'm sorry, just had to say that.

Just do what those fellers up there^^^^^said. They're Good!

jestridge
07-25-2012, 01:02 PM
Never use it but lot of smoke flavor product we have use ,liquid smoke is an addtive.

MisterChrister
07-25-2012, 01:42 PM
Not sure about chicken, but I've heard a few people on here use it when boiling their ribs.....just sayin'

Terry The Toad
07-25-2012, 08:59 PM
Liquid smoke? what the... ? Dang, you mean I spent two grand on a smoker when I can BUY smoke flavoring in a bottle for five bucks?! :doh:

Hey, I'm just funnin' guys... :becky:

Butt Rubb'n BBQ
07-25-2012, 09:18 PM
I've seen it used a lot in the restaurant biz but its put into the marinade. Whiskey Tango Foxtrot ! BOILED RIBS.

Westexbbq
07-25-2012, 09:46 PM
I think some sauces use liquid smoke but I have no experience with it to speak of.

mwert
07-25-2012, 10:03 PM
I don't think you'll find a lot of fans of liquid smoke here. IMO the best smoke flavor comes from clean burning wood.

As for keeping chicken moist, I haven't found it necessary to introduce liquid into the cooking process. I do normally brine, however, then spatchcock (don't know if you're familiar with the term, but it basically means butterfly) and cook anywhere from 300-350 or even more until 'till 165 in the thigh. No problem with dried out chicken. :thumb:

Hey GTR. Do you mind sharing your brine ratio (H2O/salt) and time for that whole chicken? I can't seem to get mine quite right.

Socks
07-25-2012, 11:34 PM
Hey GTR. Do you mind sharing your brine ratio (H2O/salt) and time for that whole chicken? I can't seem to get mine quite right.

http://ruhlman.com/2010/10/how-to-brine-chicken-quick-brine-recipe/

heatseeker
07-25-2012, 11:55 PM
Wait, we can't boil the ribs? :icon_smile_tongue:

Liquid smoke = RUN

Add a few chips to your cook, you'll be fine

heatseeker
07-25-2012, 11:57 PM
Plus....you can get some 2 different kinds of chips for less than 5 bucks....just sayin

And that would last you a heck of a lot longer than that little funky bottle of crap would.

Or....you could just boil the chicken with the liquid crap and finish it on the grill and call it Q

Your call....

(whispers eversolightly) don't do it.....don't do it.....

Tatoosh
07-26-2012, 12:07 AM
So, to go against the current, simply try it once. Most liquid smoke is simply smoke caught in water. It usually does not have the deep array of flavor that traditionally smoked foods do. Some folks (read most) really dislike it, but if it is one of the natural liquid smoke products, it shouldn't have a lot of the chemical tastes some talk about.

It is like vanilla, there are fake extracts, real extracts, and real vanilla beans. The real beans taste a lot better than either real extract or fake extract. But as a flavor component in your dish, if you don't have a smoker on hand, it is worth trying and deciding for yourself.

Then go get a smoker, even a cheap one. :blabla:

martyleach
07-26-2012, 01:17 AM
Frankly I have never tried it but I do believe it is used to trick the taste buds of local BBQ judges in contests when your BBQ doesn't give a big smoke taste....

RevZiLLa
07-26-2012, 04:04 PM
Just my personal taste....liquid smoke is nasty stuff. I have used smoked paprika indoors and liked it. I sometimes add a smidge to baked beans before smoking them

bananablack
07-26-2012, 05:15 PM
Liquid smoke should only be used in bbq sauce

Jonwithanegg
07-26-2012, 05:22 PM
Yup, I used to use it in my BBQ sauce but the last batch I made I grilled/smoked my peppers and onions and that added an INCREDIBLE flavor and I threw my bottle away... or at least pushed it to the back of the cabinet...

jlondon
07-26-2012, 05:28 PM
Liquid smoke should only be used in bbq sauce
Yep, sauce is just about the only thing I'd consider using it for...but I'd be mighty leery of it. I've tasted a few commercial examples, and found them truly nasty.

dddouglas
07-26-2012, 05:34 PM
I have used liquid smoke in some soup receipes. I do not think it would do any good in a pan. But it does affect the receipes I use it in.

InTheRedZoneBBQ
07-26-2012, 06:26 PM
used sparingly in BBQ sauces, I think its fine. Definitely don't want it around meat or chicken IMO...

Teleking
07-26-2012, 07:31 PM
Don't feed the troll! That has not been back

NorCalQue
07-26-2012, 08:43 PM
My bottle didn't work. I poured it out during last years 4th of July party to smoke-out the backyard and it just made a mess. I should have saved my receipt.:rolleyes:

"Bone to Bark" BBQ
07-26-2012, 08:48 PM
Liquid smoke is great........... for pouring down a drain! Save your money.

PYGBOYZ
07-26-2012, 09:33 PM
I have used this in the past when I was a young griller and Q'er. I normally would use it a marinade or injectable sauce. However, use it sparingly as it a very strong smoke flavor. I entered a Weber Commander of the Grill contest and made my normal injection marinade. However, used too much Liquid smoke and did not tast my injection prior to injection. What a mistake. My Steak came out with a very over smoked flavor. So use very sparingly.

PYGBOYZ'

Kaita
07-27-2012, 10:58 PM
I think you lost him at "spatchcock"....
I learned about spatchcocked from Steven Raichlen's book where is tells step by step instructions on how to cut it so that it unfolds like a opened book.

gtr
07-27-2012, 11:04 PM
Hey GTR. Do you mind sharing your brine ratio (H2O/salt) and time for that whole chicken? I can't seem to get mine quite right.

Sorry to take a couple days - been farking around in WP. :tsk:

This thread (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=119611&highlight=brining+101) has a lot of great info. The OP, SmokinOkie, has links in his siggy which have pdf's of brining recipes and info. It has worked really well for me.

Kaita
07-27-2012, 11:09 PM
Once again, thanks you all. On a mositurizer note, does anyone use some time of tenderizer like Morton Salt Tenderizer?

jfletcher84
07-27-2012, 11:13 PM
I have never heard of using liquid smoke as a flavour carrier. I spatchcock, remove the skin and then brine them. The salt will draw fluid in through the process of difussion drawing moisture and what ever flavours you have in the brine. Liquid smoke is ok in a bind, but I have only found hickory flavoured.

Mo-Dave
07-27-2012, 11:14 PM
Liquid smoke has a place in the cupboards believe it or not, if used correctly. At times, not all the time, I will use it on a hamburger or chops when pan frying in the house or something like bean and bacon soup, and some other things. Oddly enough I have never put it in a bbq sauce, I look hard at store bought sauce with it in it and avoid it if I can.

I don't use it often and if I do it is very sparingly. If you are asking if you can splash it all over a brisket or ribs and cook them in the oven with the same results if it were smoked with wood outside, not in a Million years. If you do use some as I suggest be sure to shake it well, cause it will settle to the bottom and its just dirty water on top of that.
Dave

gtr
07-27-2012, 11:19 PM
Once again, thanks you all. On a mositurizer note, does anyone use some time of tenderizer like Morton Salt Tenderizer?

I've had the best luck with brining, spatchcocking, and cooking to 165 in the thigh - let it rest for at least 10 minutes, and it'll be plenty moist.

I normally buy organic hippy chickens. They seem to be better quality, less fatty, more tender, etc. That said, I'm sure there are some fellers here who can take any chicken you give them and make it rock. I, however, need all the help I can get.

I have not used tenderizer, so I can't really speak to whether or not it's good to use.