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Boshizzle
06-04-2012, 08:40 PM
I have been working hard on improving the bark on hot and fast brisket. Here is a pic of my latest attempt. I used a rub I developed based on a 19th century Virginia barbecue beef cook named Black Hawk. I can't wait to tell you all the details about him. Until then, here is a pic of the bark on my latest HnF brisket using my Black Hawk rub. I still have a little work to do on it but I will post the details soon. Until then, here is a pic of a delicious, tender, juicy barbecued brisket I had for dinner tonight. That bark was developed in about 5 hours.

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=325&pictureid=5803

Thanks for looking.

landarc
06-04-2012, 08:49 PM
Wow, that is very nice. Now, the rest of the story?

jsperk
06-04-2012, 08:51 PM
Excellent looking brisket.

silverfinger
06-04-2012, 08:57 PM
I will be waiting!!!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk in stealth mode.

Boshizzle
06-04-2012, 09:52 PM
Here is another shot of the bark. The brisket was shared 50/50 between me and my nephew who is also a member of my cook team.

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=325&pictureid=5808

---k---
06-04-2012, 09:55 PM
That bark looks tasty. I'm interested in seeing your recipe. I remember the old newspaper article you posted a while ago. I've tried several commercial rubs on brisket and just don't like it as much as just straight salt and pepper. The color on your's looks a lot closer to my salt and pepper than it does to the commercial rubs... maybe I'm crazy?

Boshizzle
06-04-2012, 10:17 PM
Nope, BBQ should be simple. Salt & pepper is a big part of the process. But, the process is a big part of the bark too.

bigabyte
06-04-2012, 10:19 PM
Looking forward to the details!

AustinKnight
06-04-2012, 11:01 PM
Looks mighty fine brotha:thumbup:

jmellor
06-04-2012, 11:06 PM
Nice work! Interested in the rest of the story!

Boshizzle
06-04-2012, 11:08 PM
Looks mighty fine brotha:thumbup:

Thanks to the brother who lives in the town with the best brisket in the country!

retired trucker
06-05-2012, 12:25 AM
I was born and raised in the Great State of Texas and ate a lot of brisket from a lot of the "famous" joints, and I never had any that looked as good or as juicy as what you have pictured. Great Job Bo. :eusa_clap:clap:

El Ropo
06-05-2012, 01:11 AM
That looks a amazing!

Question, you say that the bark was developed in 5 hours, was the meat done in 5 hours? And did you foil or pan it during the process? And what temp was it cooked at?

BRBBQ
06-05-2012, 01:25 AM
Looking good, and looks like you put the meat over the fire to get the bark

Boshizzle
06-05-2012, 08:47 AM
That looks a amazing!

Question, you say that the bark was developed in 5 hours, was the meat done in 5 hours? And did you foil or pan it during the process? And what temp was it cooked at?

About 325F and I did use foil.

QDoc
06-05-2012, 09:26 AM
I love a thick bark on brisket but I never could keep it from flaking off while slicing which I think took away from my appearance scores when I used to compete. How did this do?

Boshizzle
06-05-2012, 09:28 AM
THis was better than most in the past. I still have a little work to do but I think I'm going in the right direction. This was a big improvement over previous attempts.

syndicate559
06-05-2012, 11:37 AM
interesting. I'd definitely like to hear more. I seem to lose the "integrity" of my bark when I foil, but I like the moistness that the foil gives the flat, so it's always seemed like a trade-off for me. Looks like you had it both ways on this one!

gtr
06-05-2012, 11:54 AM
That really does look great. I think it's super farking cool that you're digging into the roots of all this stuff. I read "Barbecue: History of an American Institution" based on one of yer posts - got any more recommends?

History, tradition, etc. aside - I'd hit that farking brisket hard! :hungry:

V-wiz
06-05-2012, 12:44 PM
You little Teaser.. That looks great, id also like to know what you did.

deguerre
06-05-2012, 12:47 PM
Man. That's so juicy looking it almost seems as if you braised it.

Pitmaster T
06-05-2012, 02:25 PM
About 325F and I did use foil.

\
Foil being the key to "Blackhawk's" sucess.

This will be an interesting read, considering the amount of beef in the Virgina area in the 19th Century. You must be talking about the latter half, right?

I love the look of the bark and look forward to your reveal.

HB-BBQ
06-05-2012, 03:01 PM
That looks great, I too would like to hear more about this black hawk gentleman and process he used.

JS-TX
06-05-2012, 05:19 PM
Wow, great looking bark and brisket! Can't wait to hear the details.

Boshizzle
06-05-2012, 08:33 PM
\
Foil being the key to "Blackhawk's" sucess.

This will be an interesting read, considering the amount of beef in the Virgina area in the 19th Century. You must be talking about the latter half, right?

I love the look of the bark and look forward to your reveal.

Thanks, Donnie!

Yep, it was in the last 2 thirds of the 19th century. BBQ beef was very popular in VA especially at large community and politcal barbecues as far back as the 1820's. VA whole beef cooks were in big demand and were hired to cook in other states including New York and North Carolina. Just like today, the BBQ cook was part of the "draw" to get people to attend.

caliking
06-05-2012, 08:57 PM
That's a great looking brisket. I'm still learning the ways of the brisky, and that sir, is my inspiration!

LMAJ
06-05-2012, 09:17 PM
That looks amazing!

Bbqin fool
06-06-2012, 12:50 AM
Good lord Joe! That's some serious bark there! Great stuff!:thumb:

plethoraofpinatas
06-06-2012, 02:10 AM
Boshizzle- did you post a few weeks back that you were writing a book on the roots of Virginia barbeque? As a fellow Virginian I'm interested to read about our regional style. And thanks for the excellent pics!

Big Biscuit
06-06-2012, 04:46 AM
I just drooled all over my keyboard. That looks amazingly good.

HawgNationBBQ
06-06-2012, 12:09 PM
That looks awesome. Did you cook it on the Jambo?

Pitmaster T
06-06-2012, 10:46 PM
Thanks, Donnie!

Yep, it was in the last 2 thirds of the 19th century. BBQ beef was very popular in VA especially at large community and politcal barbecues as far back as the 1820's. VA whole beef cooks were in big demand and were hired to cook in other states including New York and North Carolina. Just like today, the BBQ cook was part of the "draw" to get people to attend.


Honestly, not saying you are wrong... but for me... I would like to see a primary source citation. PM me when you get a chance. This would be a revelation to me if it were commonplace before the 1880s. I could be wrong... but..... well, beef being very popular during even reconstruction is a stretch to me. I really am sincere about a citation here.

Boshizzle
06-06-2012, 10:47 PM
Honestly, not saying you are wrong... but for me... I would like to see a primary source citation. PM me when you get a chance. This would be a revelation to me if it were commonplace before the 1880s. I could be wrong... but..... well, beef being very popular during even reconstruction is a stretch to me. I really am sincere about a citation here.

I will, bro, I promise. Just as soon as the reviews are done by the 19th century "Virginia Cookery" experts. However, during reconstruction BBQ was pretty much a rare event in any occasion. Reconstruction was a disaster for VA BBQ cooking. There just wasn't enough $$$$ around to hold many barbecues.

Ye Olde Party Palace
06-06-2012, 11:39 PM
Dang, that made me hungry. Looks GREAT...:clap:

Pitmaster T
06-07-2012, 09:00 AM
I will, bro, I promise. Just as soon as the reviews are done by the 19th century "Virginia Cookery" experts. However, during reconstruction BBQ was pretty much a rare event in any occasion. Reconstruction was a disaster for VA BBQ cooking. There just wasn't enough $$$$ around to hold many barbecues.


Allow me to clarify. First, I am all for people turning popular concensus on its ear. I have been a very vocal critic of anyone who says "bbq is not boiling, or simmering," and often sort of make jabs at the whole "bbq is not foiling, yes it is, not its not, crowd" and of course I always have revealed; with much success by the way, that the "bbq is low and slow only," concept, well, is a bunch of malarky.

But what I find eciting about your claim is the phrase "very popular in the last 2/3 of the 19th century. This would be 1833 to 1899.

Disecting this further I would venture to say a couple of things. Popular consensus has Va BBQ swinecentric with some leanings to goats as well. Heck, when I competed back in the late 1980s and early to mid 1990s beef was rarely a category at all east of Memphis. Then there are the actual limitations of the period. Before 1860.... beef I thought was definately a rarity in the region. In the 1830s and 1840's even Texas was only beginning to domestisize its stock. Va, being more developed perhaps they had more beef.

Forget about during the Civil War. Just forget about it as most anythign with a pulse was being canned. Reconstruction... again, its hard to fathom this considering Sherman's sweep south, the price of beef north and the rising dairy efforts. So, the actual availibility of beef to the extent you said "hey, instead of making a big profit on selling this cow for slaughter I think I will cook it to feed a crowd instead of a few pigs" well that would be interesting - very interesting.

Perhaps though it is your terminology that has me mixed with feelings. "Very popular" may not mean it was a common place event (which is how I am taking it). It may mean, when it was done, which was a rarity, it was popularly received....

Once again, not saying you are wrong. I am saying, as a historian, I would like to see several primaries that corroborate this then it needs to be properly analyzed considering availibilty.

One thing is for sure... it is a VERY interesting thesis. Also, considering your last sentences above.... this places beef bbq as commonplace and popular from 1833 to 1860....THAT would be VERY interesting.

Boshizzle
06-07-2012, 10:15 AM
Allow me to clarify. First, I am all for people turning popular concensus on its ear. I have been a very vocal critic of anyone who says "bbq is not boiling, or simmering," and often sort of make jabs at the whole "bbq is not foiling, yes it is, not its not, crowd" and of course I always have revealed; with much success by the way, that the "bbq is low and slow only," concept, well, is a bunch of malarky.

But what I find eciting about your claim is the phrase "very popular in the last 2/3 of the 19th century. This would be 1833 to 1899.

Disecting this further I would venture to say a couple of things. Popular consensus has Va BBQ swinecentric with some leanings to goats as well. Heck, when I competed back in the late 1980s and early to mid 1990s beef was rarely a category at all east of Memphis. Then there are the actual limitations of the period. Before 1860.... beef I thought was definately a rarity in the region. In the 1830s and 1840's even Texas was only beginning to domestisize its stock. Va, being more developed perhaps they had more beef.

Forget about during the Civil War. Just forget about it as most anythign with a pulse was being canned. Reconstruction... again, its hard to fathom this considering Sherman's sweep south, the price of beef north and the rising dairy efforts. So, the actual availibility of beef to the extent you said "hey, instead of making a big profit on selling this cow for slaughter I think I will cook it to feed a crowd instead of a few pigs" well that would be interesting - very interesting.

Perhaps though it is your terminology that has me mixed with feelings. "Very popular" may not mean it was a common place event (which is how I am taking it). It may mean, when it was done, which was a rarity, it was popularly received....

Once again, not saying you are wrong. I am saying, as a historian, I would like to see several primaries that corroborate this then it needs to be properly analyzed considering availibilty.

One thing is for sure... it is a VERY interesting thesis. Also, considering your last sentences above.... this places beef bbq as commonplace and popular from 1833 to 1860....THAT would be VERY interesting.

Fair enough. Let me try to clarify some of my statements. When I wrote "popular" I meant that it was often the meat of choice cooked at large political barbecues and was the center piece. A large steer roasting over an open fire was quite the spectacle and was able to draw in large crowds. So, while it may not have been something people would BBQ in their backyards, it was the "popular" choice because of the big show it provided.

Also, I think that the differences in the classes in 18th and 19th century VA has been largely overlooked by barbecue historians. As you know, the more money one had the more beef and sugar and mutton, etc. one was able to eat. While all ate fatback and pork, the poorer classes and slaves rarely got the best cuts of meat and ate a lot of fatback and corn bread except on special occasions or large community/political barbecues.

Boshizzle
06-07-2012, 06:16 PM
OK, I have the day off tomorrow so I'm cooking another brisket. I will be making some mods to the Black Hawk brisket process. If it all turns out as expected, I will post the process in detail. Wish me luck!

twinsfan
06-07-2012, 06:26 PM
I've read the biography about barbecue in North Carolina, forget the name, but they talked about George Washington frequently attending barbecues, and often steer were mentioned in his own letters(Not the word steer but a synonym). Granted this is the late 18th century, but their research demonstrated it was 30/70 or so between cattle and shoat (hog) . I think Boshizzle is very right, I remember several mentions between 1770 and 1815 about whole cow cooks for political events. In fact, the NC governer had a whole steer cooked in 1770 or 1771 in Wilmington to try to cool tensions but the cooked cow (I believe) ended up in the water.


EDIT: Here's the book, fantastic. Amazon.com: Holy Smoke: The Big Book of North Carolina Barbecue (9780807832431): John Shelton Reed, Dale Volberg Reed, William McKinney: Books

Pitmaster T
06-07-2012, 06:33 PM
I've read the biography about barbecue in North Carolina, forget the name, but they talked about George Washington frequently attending barbecues, and often steer were mentioned in his own letters(Not the word steer but a synonym). Granted this is the late 18th century, but their research demonstrated it was 30/70 or so between cattle and shoat (hog) . I think Boshizzle is very right, I remember several mentions between 1770 and 1815 about whole cow cooks for political events. In fact, the NC governer had a whole steer cooked in 1770 or 1771 in Wilmington to try to cool tensions but the cooked cow (I believe) ended up in the water.


EDIT: Here's the book, fantastic. Amazon.com: Holy Smoke: The Big Book of North Carolina Barbecue (9780807832431): John Shelton Reed, Dale Volberg Reed, William McKinney: Books (http://www.amazon.com/Holy-Smoke-North-Carolina-Barbecue/dp/080783243X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1339108071&sr=8-1)


Excellent! Very Good. This is going to be interesting... I love when something turns a common conception on its ear.

Happy Hapgood
06-07-2012, 06:40 PM
Mighty Fine all the way around Sir!

Q-Dat
06-07-2012, 06:59 PM
Excellent! Very Good. This is going to be interesting... I love when something turns a common conception on its ear.

It may take him a while to decode the method out though. I heard that Blackhawk named all of his ingredients after popular musicians of that age.

If I'm not mistaken, I believe Scott Joplin=Salt, and John Philip Sousa= Pepper ;)

Boshizzle
06-07-2012, 07:01 PM
It may take him a while to decode the method out though. I heard that Blackhawk named all of his ingredients after popular musicians of that age.

If I'm not mistaken, I believe Scott Joplin=Salt, and John Philip Sousa= Pepper ;)

Lol!

Boshizzle
06-07-2012, 07:05 PM
That looks awesome. Did you cook it on the Jambo?

This one was cooked on my Keg.