PDA

View Full Version : What's in the roux?


zakaluka
01-24-2012, 02:38 PM
Foil and bake that big slab of pork on low for 6 hours (after smoking), and quite a bit of roux will be left afterwards. I always find myself wondering if there's anything I can do with it. Typically it chills in the pan and turns to gelatin before I get to pulling the meat, and I just throw it out.

But looking closely, it's really not very fatty and it'd be easy to skim the fat off top anyway.

What does pork gravy taste like? Is there any reason NOT to save all the roux and make something out of it? Every time I go through this I find myself thinking, nothing wrong with gelatin. Even gelatin rendered out of pig tendons.

All I hear about is people using it to baste.

El Pistolero
01-24-2012, 02:51 PM
Generally I pour it back over the pork after pulling, but if I wasn't going to do that I'd separate the fat, then use the rest of the juice for gravy or soup. Use it just like you would stock.

The fat I'd use to make a roux for thickening...just combine the fat with flour in equal portions by weight.

Lake Dogs
01-24-2012, 02:54 PM
I cannot tell you how many gallons I've thrown out. I wonder if I could save some of it and use it in place of lard; sort of a seasoned lard if you will...

El Pistolero
01-24-2012, 03:12 PM
I cannot tell you how many gallons I've thrown out. I wonder if I could save some of it and use it in place of lard; sort of a seasoned lard if you will...

2lard

noun
: a soft white solid or semisolid fat obtained by rendering fatty pork

So yes, separate the fat and you have seasoned lard.

landarc
01-24-2012, 04:06 PM
I use both the rendered liquid and the fat, for different purposes. The fat can be used like lard, but, the texture is a little different. It is not as dense, I have founs it is an excellent way to add seasoing to things like noodles and such. I will put a teaspoon over ramen or udon, then pour steaming hot brother over it. Incredible. I also use it to make roux and as a part of the fat for frying things like hash and potatoes.

The other part of the liquid can be used as an injection, as a very concentrated and unctuous form of liquid smoke additive to injections, as a base for broths and soups. No need to chuck it, it is very smoky, which means unless you like a really strong smoke, it can be too much for many palates.

Bogus Chezz Hawg
01-24-2012, 04:17 PM
If the "roux" is the meat drippings...Use a fat separator to remove and discard as much fat as you can, then add the good stuff to your BBQ sauce.

justjack
01-24-2012, 07:38 PM
2 or 3 spoonfuls and some cornflour makes a very noice gravy for chippies or wedges.

Ron_L
01-24-2012, 07:42 PM
If the "roux" is the meat drippings...Use a fat separator to remove and discard as much fat as you can, then add the good stuff to your BBQ sauce.

I was wondering about that, too. A roux is a slurry made from flour and a fat that is used to thicken sauces or soups.

Bogus Chezz Hawg
01-24-2012, 07:44 PM
I was wondering about that, too. A roux is a slurry made from flour and a fat that is used to thicken sauces or soups.

That's what I thought too.

DaveMW
01-24-2012, 07:52 PM
...then pour steaming hot brother over it. :shock: I am fearing for your poor sibling. :becky:

DaveMW
01-24-2012, 07:54 PM
A roux is a slurry made from flour and a fat that is used to thicken sauces or soups.


From AllRecipes.com: "To make a basic roux, use equal weights of fat and flour."

Ron_L
01-24-2012, 07:58 PM
From AllRecipes.com: "To make a basic roux, use equal weights of fat and flour."

Isn't that what i said? :-P

DaveMW
01-24-2012, 08:01 PM
Isn't that what i said? :-P


You were dead on Ron. I meant my post as supporting documentation. :thumb:

thirdeye
01-24-2012, 10:00 PM
Here is my roux..... and here's what goes in it



http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v377/thirdeye2/Cooking/DSC04482a.jpg


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v377/thirdeye2/Cooking/DSC04485a.jpg

Gore
01-24-2012, 10:31 PM
It sounds good in principle, but just a warning to use sparingly. While in the oven you can separate the fat from the juice and do what you like with them with great results, in the smoker that "goodness" is saturated with smoke. It is liquid smoke au jus. If you taste it, you may find that it bears more than a slight resemblance to bong water ... or so I'm told. :roll: Yes I have used some of the juice on pulled pork, but definitely don't go crazy with it or you may find yourself disgusted. Yes, I have experimented with it a bit, but we usually just throw it out. There is such a thing as too much smoke.

Bogus Chezz Hawg
01-24-2012, 10:39 PM
It sounds good in principle, but just a warning to use sparingly. While in the oven you can separate the fat from the juice and do what you like with them with great results, in the smoker that "goodness" is saturated with smoke. It is liquid smoke au jus. If you taste it, you may find that it bears more than a slight resemblance to bong water ... or so I'm told. :roll: Yes I have used some of the juice on pulled pork, but definitely don't go crazy with it or you may find yourself disgusted. Yes, I have experimented with it a bit, but we usually just throw it out. There is such a thing as too much smoke.

Allegedly! :-P

cholloway
01-24-2012, 10:42 PM
Using pork drippings in other recipes is like re-using the milk solids from clarified butter... Yummmm!

El Pistolero
01-24-2012, 10:48 PM
If you taste it, you may find that it bears more than a slight resemblance to bong water

If it tastes like bong water, you used to much "oregano" in the rub.

dealm9
01-24-2012, 11:27 PM
:shock: I am fearing for your poor sibling. :becky:
hahahahahahahahhahaa

captndan
01-25-2012, 11:16 AM
Once again RonL is correct. "Y'all aint got no roux you got drippins.' Sometime visit Norlins.

Lake Dogs
01-25-2012, 11:47 AM
Being of cajun decent myself and grew up eating traditional cajun food every day, I'd say probably 1/2 of my cooking involves a roux. Traditional roux uses lard, however lately it's become fashionable to use oils. Anola Prudhomme went on a diet and put out a cajun cookbook where she would make a roux sans any lard or oils; just plain browned flour (which if you think making a mahogany roux is tough, try this) and then adding in fat free chicken broth at the end.

My roux, being pretty much a traditionalist at heart, is always with lard. To me, 50/50 is a little thin and oily, I usually go more towards 60 flour 40 lard.

Traditional cajun roux is dark, VERY dark mahogany color and is very close to burning. New Orleans roux (them thar city folk ain't REAL cajun) is usually much lighter and more toward the color of a dark peanut butter.

RutledgeQ
01-25-2012, 12:34 PM
I do my roux in the oven at 350 and pull it when I think it is done. It depends on what I am making. A light rough will not have the nutty toasty taste but it will thicken a lot more. The darker the roux the nuttier the taste but the less it thickens a sauce or stock.

razrbakcrzy
01-25-2012, 01:50 PM
I too found his use of the word roux to be perplexing... I also know a roux as flour and some sort of cooking fat(lard, bacon fat, oil, butter). Now I have many times used the drippings from smoked andouille sausage or pork butt to heat up some nice shrimp and then flavor a roux for Gumbo or Étouffée. I might just use it over some cooked white rice and hamburger meat to make dirty rice.. you talk about smokey goodness...! Wow!

Ole Man Dan
01-27-2012, 08:36 AM
2 or 3 spoonfuls and some cornflour makes a very noice gravy for chippies or wedges.

OR...

You can make 'Red Eye Gravy' by adding coffee and black pepper & cooking in a skillet...
(You can tell I'm a 'Son of the South')