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View Full Version : Lang 36 vs. Jambo Backyard


Cack
01-24-2012, 10:19 AM
So I'm starting a new job in 2 weeks that will be a very nice pay increase. After I guy my g/f something shiny. I'll be look towards the next smoker. Which of those 2 does everyone around here like best? What are your pros and cons with each?

Thanks in advance :thumb:

Greyeagle
01-24-2012, 11:37 AM
I use to have a Lang ,never had a Jambo, but I can say I would take the Jambo over the Lang.. I think the deflector plate is to close to the rack on the Lang giving off to much radiant heat...

Cack
01-24-2012, 12:11 PM
I like the size of the Lang, but if/when I start doing some comps. I really want a Jambo, so I was thinking that'd be a good one to get to get used to the basic design that he uses.

Boshizzle
01-24-2012, 12:36 PM
I think the Jambo is a better deal than the Lang 36 plus the Jambo has the insulated firebox that does make a difference in fuel consumption.

El Pistolero
01-24-2012, 12:48 PM
I think the Jambo is a better deal than the Lang 36 plus the Jambo has the insulated firebox that does make a difference in fuel consumption.

I'm a little curious how the Jambo is a better deal...it's almost twice the price of the Lang, for 33% more cooking surface. Is there something I'm missing?

jdbh
01-24-2012, 01:15 PM
i just sold my jambo backyard last week it is an awesome smoker i only got rid of it because i need more cooking capacity and dont have enough room in my garage for both . cold rain or snow dosen't effect the jambo cooks great

Cack
01-24-2012, 03:47 PM
i just sold my jambo backyard last week it is an awesome smoker i only got rid of it because i need more cooking capacity and dont have enough room in my garage for both . cold rain or snow dosen't effect the jambo cooks great

Just sold it? NOOOOOOOOO

I like the Jambo a LOT, but wasn't sure if it was worth the price

Utah Jake
01-24-2012, 04:15 PM
Rule of thumb: Figure out the maximum size smoker you'll need....then buy one size bigger.

Full Draw BBQ
01-24-2012, 04:19 PM
Amen to that Jake!!!!!!

BBQ Bandit
01-24-2012, 04:59 PM
Rule of thumb: Figure out the maximum size smoker you'll need....then buy one size bigger.

Amen to that Jake!!!!!!

See my signature below...

The Lang 36 is not the same size as the Jambo Backyard (48"). See the Lang 48 patio.
http://langbbqsmokers.com/lang48/lang48_patio.html

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=75&pictureid=1453

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=75&pictureid=1451

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=436&pictureid=2362

Myself... have not cooked on a Jambo.
Have seen what Meadowcreek offers (an hour from my house).
Have driven several hours for Langs.

Boshizzle
01-24-2012, 05:52 PM
I'm a little curious how the Jambo is a better deal...it's almost twice the price of the Lang, for 33% more cooking surface. Is there something I'm missing?

Price isn't everything. Insulated fire box & larger cooking area are two things that I think make the Jambo a better deal.

mking7
01-24-2012, 06:09 PM
Price isn't everything. Insulated fire box & larger cooking area are two things that I think make the Jambo a better deal.


And you can get a chrome stack! :laugh:

Seriously, I don't have a Lang and have never cooked on one. I like my Jambos for many reason. The fit and finish is top notch which I like. Doesn't make it cook any better but makes it look better and I view this as furniture for my patio so I like it to look nice. I like the stainless shelf as well. I bought mine so I wouldn't have to roll out the J3 every time I wanted to cook. I cook more now having both.

But, I bet it's a little bit like nitpicking HDTV's at BestBuy. Whichever tv you take home is going to be 10x better than the one it's replacing at your house so you can't really go wrong.

bam
01-24-2012, 06:12 PM
If money is not in the picture Jambo.

Bogus Chezz Hawg
01-24-2012, 07:16 PM
I like the size of the Lang, but if/when I start doing some comps. I really want a Jambo, so I was thinking that'd be a good one to get to get used to the basic design that he uses.

Sounds like a plan, Cack. I never cooked on a Jambo, but they make a top quality pit from what I've seen at comps. Like you stated... you want to get used to Jambo's basic design (I know what you mean) but... IMO, other than the large sized insulated firebox, and top notch quality (desirable features for sure), Jambo's are a basic designed stickburner (normal flow).

When I was in the market for my current backyard stickburner, I narrowed my choices down to Jambo, Klose, & Lang. Any one of these would have been a good choice as they have all proven to produce award winning BBQ. I chose to go with Lang for a few reasons. First & foremost was their reputation, but the reverse flow technology is what caught my eye and was the deciding factor. Oh yeah, and the price could not be beat. Yes, the external appearance is not as nice as a Jambo, but I still think my Lang looks great in my backyard. My two previous stickburners (el cheapo's) were both basic designs (normal flow). I wanted something different. After cooking on my Lang for 2.5 years I will say...I love my Lang and would recommend Lang to anyone. It is very easy to maintain desired temps, and it virtually eliminates hot temperature spikes due to the reverse flow design. A Lang cooks evenly from end to end because of the flue (deflector plate). I never thought it produces too much heat as another Brethren stated earlier. I filled my cooking chamber with 8 turkeys once at thanksgiving. The ones placed right by the firebox cooked at the same rate as the ones placed at the opposite end. If you ever have a desire to cook a whole hog, I think the Lang would be the better choice because of the even cooking in the entire cooking chamber. Also, someone once said in an old thread that you can't sear in a Lang. Build a hotter than usual fire, remove the cooking grate closest to the firebox and place the meat directly on the flue. Instant searing! Also, cleaning a Lang is very easy. The flue is designed to channel grease to the grease drain without much of a mess to clean up after cooking. I use a weed burner to char any solids that accumulate on the flue. Then I scrape the flue with a cheap drywall scraper. I'm done in a matter of a few minutes.

Having said this, go with your gut instinct. You will be happy with your choice, whatever it may be. You will master whichever cooker you own & make great BBQ. IMO it's not the cooker as much as it is the cook!

Oh yeah, and as stated several times earlier...Buy one size larger than the size you think you need. One more thing... You are much closer to Georgia than Texas (think shipping costs). Okay, I'm closer to Texas than Georgia so shipping costs didn't matter to me.

Good luck with your new job and your new future stickburner!

Ron_L
01-24-2012, 08:07 PM
Just to muddy the waters... :-D

http://www.peoriacookers.com/custom-cookers/backyard-cooker.html

Peoria Custom Cookers makes a nice 24 x 48" backyard cooker and it is available with an insulated firebox.

Pappy Q
01-24-2012, 10:54 PM
I've had a Lang and now have my 2nd Jambo ordered, so I'm a Jambo man. Lang is a fine cooker but Jambo is the next step up.

KingRanch450
01-24-2012, 11:17 PM
I don't have either one....have looked at and researched both. They are both quality cookers (think the Jambo is a step up). I am curious about the air intake on the firebox though. The firebox is huge and insulated which I like but the air intake system doesn't thrill me. You can have a furnace type door put on instead which gives you more air control but that's a $900 upgrade.

Boshizzle
01-24-2012, 11:34 PM
I don't have either one....have looked at and researched both. They are both quality cookers (think the Jambo is a step up). I am curious about the air intake on the firebox though. The firebox is huge and insulated which I like but the air intake system doesn't thrill me. You can have a furnace type door put on instead which gives you more air control but that's a $900 upgrade.

Regardless of which door type you choose, you still regulate air flow using the chimney. I've spent time with Johnny Trigg, Rod Gray, and a couple of other Jambo users including Tuffy Stone and they all regulate the air flow mainly using the chimney. So, the inlet vent on the door is a moot point. And, Jamie Geer recommends using the chimney to regulate air flow too.

The only thing the furnace door gives you is the cool factor. It looks so good on those pits.

KingRanch450
01-24-2012, 11:53 PM
Regardless of which door type you choose, you still regulate air flow using the chimney. I've spent time with Johnny Trigg, Rod Gray, and a couple of other Jambo users including Tuffy Stone and they all regulate the air flow mainly using the chimney. So, the inlet vent on the door is a moot point. And, Jamie Geer recommends using the chimney to regulate air flow too.

The only thing the furnace door gives you is the cool factor. It looks so good on those pits.

Yes it does!!!

Cack
01-25-2012, 09:08 AM
So from what I've learned is ... 1. I really can't go wrong either way ... 2. If I did the Lang. The 48 would be the model to compare not the 36 ... C. Check with Brethren before all major purchases.

Another question. How weather proof are these? For that kind of money. I'd really want to take care of them. Also, how easy is it to put out the fire? If I move it to my garage I don't want it to still be burning.

BBQ Bandit
01-25-2012, 09:30 AM
So from what I've learned is ... 1. I really can't go wrong either way ... 2. If I did the Lang. The 48 would be the model to compare not the 36 ... C. Check with Brethren before all major purchases.

Another question. How weather proof are these? For that kind of money. I'd really want to take care of them. Also, how easy is it to put out the fire? If I move it to my garage I don't want it to still be burning.

The same way we transport cookers in trailers after use... physically remove the fire before storing the pit. Once the fire is removed... give it an hour or two. Have several steel ash buckets for the occasion.

Weatherproof is subjective... it will get rained on if left outdoors. That's where 'seasoning your pit' like a cast iron skillet comes into play.... will offer a better weather resistance by sealing the steel.

Good luck in your decision.

Cack
01-25-2012, 10:10 AM
The same way we transport cookers in trailers after use... physically remove the fire before storing the pit. Once the fire is removed... give it an hour or two. Have several steel ash buckets for the occasion.

Weatherproof is subjective... it will get rained on if left outdoors. That's where 'seasoning your pit' like a cast iron skillet comes into play.... will offer a better weather resistance by sealing the steel.

Good luck in your decision.

So I would just dump everything in there and let it burn out?

Bogus Chezz Hawg
01-25-2012, 10:30 AM
So I would just dump everything in there and let it burn out?

I use a galvanized steel bucket with a tight fitting lid to snuff out the coals.
It will put out the fire fairly quickly. I bought mine at Home Depot for about $10.

Jaskew82
01-25-2012, 10:46 AM
Rule of thumb: Figure out the maximum size smoker you'll need....then buy one size bigger.

you are 100% right about that! I learned it the hard way!

Cack
01-25-2012, 12:04 PM
I use a galvanized steel bucket with a tight fitting lid to snuff out the coals.
It will put out the fire fairly quickly. I bought mine at Home Depot for about $10.

Great, thanks

nmayeux
01-26-2012, 12:36 AM
Cack,

I am very much in the same mind set as you when taking care of my smokers. I have had my Lang 60 for 7 years now, and by keeping her inside (the garage) and a regular coating of Crisco on the firebox she is completely rust free. As to handling the fire when I am finished, I use a flat shovel to move the fire and ashes to a bucket or steel wheelbarrow, and use a hose to complete extinguish the fire. Also, by using a wire brush, I clean the grates and pan after each cook, as well as use an old shopvac to vacuum the firebox (ashes+water=rust).

By taking care of you cooker, it should last pretty much forever no matter which one you buy. Oh, like the others said, buy the absolute biggest smoker you can afford.

AustinKnight
01-26-2012, 12:58 AM
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=60378&stc=1&d=1327556146

What tha fark, what channels does it get?:heh: jk I know it's for easy clean up

ALLENY
01-26-2012, 04:12 AM
just to muddy the waters... :-d

http://www.peoriacookers.com/custom-cookers/backyard-cooker.html

peoria custom cookers makes a nice 24 x 48" backyard cooker and it is available with an insulated firebox.

wow ! That looks nice! Does anyone have one of these?

kihrer
01-26-2012, 09:53 AM
Cack,

One thing to consider... When you are looking at the 48 Lang compared to the 48 Jambo, you are looking at $170 price difference. The Jambo has an insulated firebox and the Lang is a reverse flow. Fuel cost (i.e. wood) is going to be less on the Jambo unless you have your own free source.

Cack
01-26-2012, 10:19 AM
Thanks everyone. I believe I'm going to break down and get the Jambo (although it'll be a few months before I do that)

GrillingNetwork
01-26-2012, 12:53 PM
have you looked at the GatorPit? I have done some research and bought the Party Gator. I should have it in 2 weeks....

Cack
01-26-2012, 01:23 PM
No, and I shouldn't have said I'm definitely going Jambo because I still haven't made up my mind.

I'm going to research all of the brands mentioned in here

snyper77
01-26-2012, 03:21 PM
I own a Lang trailer rig and love it.

Comparing 48" patio units: Lang $1595 vs. Jambo $1775......if that model Jambo cooks as good as the larger Jambo trailers, I'd go Jambo.

After all, this is a ONE TIME purchase.....go with your gut.....and get the biggest bang for your buck.
On another note, if you were comparing trailer units (Lang vs. Jambo), I would have to say Lang gives you more "bang" ($2795 vs. $5500) for 60" models.

I do wonder why the patio models are only $175 difference, but the trailers are $2700 difference.

nmayeux
01-26-2012, 03:26 PM
Ok, I finally went to both sites and compared the two cookers. The main differences are that the Jambo has an insulated fire box, and two doors, and the Lang is reverse flow with one door. In SC with a smaller smoker, I don't see the insulated firebox making much of a difference outside of safety. However, the Lang's reverse flow design allows for more usable cooking space as it mitigates the size of the "hot spot," and the one large door makes access much more convenient when dealing with larger cuts of meat or when dealing with a whole pig.

I know I have a Lang, and I am not pushing because of personal interest as I really want a big Jambo FWIW.

Peteg
01-28-2012, 12:31 AM
wow ! That looks nice! Does anyone have one of these?

I've got the Peoria, and I like it quite a bit. I contemplated the Jambo backyard and went with the Peoria due to proximity and a couple of extra features. FWIW, between a Lang or Jambo, I'd go with the Jambo... Insulated firebox to save on fuel, and nice long smokestacks to provide the airflow that a good offset needs.
Pete

FireChief
01-28-2012, 08:37 AM
Rule of thumb: Figure out the maximum size smoker you'll need....then buy one size bigger.

Yes !!!!!!!!!!

What he said. I have a 24" X 48" Horizon which I love but now wish I had gone one size bigger. When I was in your position I was certain I had bought too much pit but the price for this size price from Horizon was just too good to pass up. Now I wish I gone 24" X 60". :doh: As many, many people have said, better to have more than you need as you will find a use for it trust me.

Whichever way you go get at least 24" diameter. Don't even think of 20". And give Horizon Smokers a look. Not a lot of bells and whistles but a solid pit at a great price. PM me I'll send you more info. Good luck

MattG
01-28-2012, 11:17 AM
I have also been looking for a new pit. And I would say for me the insulated fire box makes a big difference. It seems easier when it rains a gulley washer or in colder weather. Also fuel consumption makes a big difference in my mind. I've cooked with a Lang but with a Jambo. Both have great reputations. But I would like to know how much fuel is burned in each pit during a 12 hr cook. That's what would help make my mind up.

jdbh
01-28-2012, 05:46 PM
my jambo backyard could easily go 2 to 2.5 hrs in between load times 20 lbs of lump and half a dozen logs would easily cook 16 hrs and i use a lot of lump to get started (more than i need) isulated fire box is a must no mater where u live. u will be sorry if u dont get that option.

nmayeux
01-28-2012, 06:19 PM
If insulated fireboxes made that much of a difference, then the other manufactures (Dave Klose, Gator Pits, etc.) would have adopted this. I think it is a nice option, but is far outweighed by more usable cooking space alloted by reverse flow in a cooker this size. If you could have both, then hands down go with that. Size matters.

nmayeux
01-28-2012, 06:24 PM
I have also been looking for a new pit. And I would say for me the insulated fire box makes a big difference. It seems easier when it rains a gulley washer or in colder weather. Also fuel consumption makes a big difference in my mind. I've cooked with a Lang but with a Jambo. Both have great reputations. But I would like to know how much fuel is burned in each pit during a 12 hr cook. That's what would help make my mind up. I burn roughly a stick an hour. I never use charcoal except to start an ititial coal bed, and fuel use depends on type of wood and load. I also cook at 225*.