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View Full Version : Is Powder Coating A Viable Option


speers90
12-27-2011, 10:07 PM
Has anyone powder coated a stickburner?

I emailed a couple places for some quotes and got one back that doesn't seem to bad for a hi temp bbq black powder coating.

Looking for any advice/input on the pro's and con's for powder coating.

stephan
12-27-2011, 10:28 PM
What is their idea of high temp? Just curious

colonel00
12-27-2011, 10:33 PM
I have been following your build thread. Out of curiosity, can you divulge what the estimate was?

speers90
12-28-2011, 06:36 AM
What is their idea of high temp? Just curious

I emailed back to confirm, but I believe it was 1200.

southernstyle
12-28-2011, 06:39 AM
how hot is high temp? could be good for cookin chamber, but not for fire box

speers90
12-28-2011, 06:41 AM
I have been following your build thread. Out of curiosity, can you divulge what the estimate was?

I was already planning on having it sandblasted and his estimate on that was $150 - $200, which is inline with the other sandblasting quotes that I've received.

His quote for the hi temp bbq black powder coat was $180. My main reason for considering either having it painted or powder coated is, by the time I buy the the equipment and paint to do it, I will likely be into it around $150 bucks.

If I decide to go this route I will detail it in the build thread!

speers90
12-28-2011, 06:45 AM
how hot is high temp? could be good for cookin chamber, but not for fire box

What temp should be I looking for on the firebox?

southernstyle
12-28-2011, 06:59 AM
What temp should be I looking for on the firebox?

do you normally cook low and slow or hot and fast? to be on the safe side probably 500-700 degrees.

speers90
12-28-2011, 07:13 AM
do you normally cook low and slow or hot and fast? to be on the safe side probably 500-700 degrees.

I think the temp rating on the bbq powder coating is 1200 degrees. I usually cook between 225 - 350, just depends on what I am cooking.

Thanks for the help!

Bob Wiley
12-28-2011, 07:17 AM
I guess the key to good powder coating is the metal preparation which has to be damn near perfect to get any kind of durability. My Onyx Oven has powder coat and was beautiful when new. One year later and it looks like ****. Little rust spots coming through from underneath the coating. Touch up would be much easier with just plain black paint.

southernstyle
12-28-2011, 07:25 AM
I guess the key to good powder coating is the metal preparation which has to be damn near perfect to get any kind of durability. My Onyx Oven has powder coat and was beautiful when new. One year later and it looks like ****. Little rust spots coming through from underneath the coating. Touch up would be much easier with just plain black paint.

i would think at 1200 degrees that sould definately be good

luke duke
12-28-2011, 07:38 AM
Aren't Jambo pits powdercoated?

speers90
12-28-2011, 08:05 AM
I guess the key to good powder coating is the metal preparation which has to be damn near perfect to get any kind of durability. My Onyx Oven has powder coat and was beautiful when new. One year later and it looks like ****. Little rust spots coming through from underneath the coating. Touch up would be much easier with just plain black paint.

Do you think that has anything to do with it being thinner metal?

sssSmoking
12-28-2011, 08:31 AM
Here ia a before and after of my home made Smoker I wraped the fireboxes with Stainless steel (because of the high heat), that is them on the bottom. First time posting photos!

I run low and slow with a target temperature of 250. Right above the fire box on the bottom round of the smoker it get very hot. I am not sure of that temperature one day I will need to check but at that point if I run a clean cloth along that area it want to cling to the smoker. Anywhere else the cloth just glides.

I have had 30 or so events with this Smoker and just love the power coat. I would say it depends on what temperatures you will be running your Smoker at.

I was thinking they baked the power coat somewhere in the 400 degree range but not sure. I think the cling of cloth is probably at a range of 325 but not sure. In my opinion you would need to stay well below the temperature that they bake the power coat at.

This has been my experience with power coating hope it helps.:-P

Don

smokeyw
12-28-2011, 08:52 AM
Powder coating is absolutely a good option. However, it is all about the prep of the metal prior to the paint application. I used to supervise a powder coat line for a large international corporation. We had to do daily chemical analysis of our five stage prep tanks and adjust the chemicals as needed. We also had to do paint samples periodically and send them to a UL approved lab for salt spray tests. In these labs they would scratch the painted sample down to the metal and hang it in a salt spray chamber. The sample would be monitored until failure when the scratch rusted out to a certain width. We had to pass a 600 hour test. We experimented with a sealer in the final stage and exceeded 1000 hours but then the company decided to send the manufacturing of our product to Mexico. Prior to sending the business to Mexico, they looked at outsourcing the powder coat operation. We found a source to do the painting but they failed salt spray tests 3 times so we didn't go that route.

AustinKnight
12-28-2011, 09:09 AM
Aren't Jambo pits powdercoated?


I think jambo pits are done with sherwin williams high heat paint, but I'm not really sure I read that they were though somewhere.

KnucklHed BBQ
12-28-2011, 09:20 AM
From what I've been told, you have 2 primary types of powder coating, 1 that is essentially plastic and baked at a few hundered degrees and the other that is ceramic based and is baked at something like 1200. There is not nearly as much demand for ceramic so it's less common, especially since the coater needs a different oven to do it and is heating that much higher for small production runs.

If we are talking about ceramic based, I think you would be fine, except I think the firebox will still eventually burn the paint off, ever see the top of an unattended pit get cherry red?

Also you've got to wonder if rain hitting the top of it when it's hot will cause any problems too...

kyle corn
12-28-2011, 11:07 AM
My dad had one of his pits powdercoated at his buddy's shop. The guy insisted that high temp powdercoating wasn't necessary and that regular powdercoating could hold up. Well, after two cooks the firebox was peeling pretty bad. The rest of it still looks great, but the firebox has been touched up with spray paint and looks pretty crappy. It could have been poor prep with the sand blasting or it could just be the powder coating couldn't handle the heat. Just something to keep in mind.

kurtsara
12-28-2011, 11:29 AM
I was already planning on having it sandblasted and his estimate on that was $150 - $200, which is inline with the other sandblasting quotes that I've received.

His quote for the hi temp bbq black powder coat was $180. My main reason for considering either having it painted or powder coated is, by the time I buy the the equipment and paint to do it, I will likely be into it around $150 bucks.

If I decide to go this route I will detail it in the build thread!

Almost sounds to cheap to me.

J_Don
12-28-2011, 03:22 PM
I am thinking that some of you are thinking about something other than powdercoating. Powdercoating has an electrical charge applied to the part to it kinda like welding is grounded and then the powder is sprayed onto the surface. Once this is completed the object is then baked to finish and harden the powder. Before baking the object has a dull look and once baked has the glossy appearance. Powdercoating in not cheap by any means unless you are taling about small parts and want to bake it in an old kitchen oven which is what a lot of backyard mechanics do, especially bikers or car finatics that want that high end look.

speers90
12-28-2011, 03:31 PM
I was concerned that it seemed a little cheap as well, I will wait until the guy emails me back with information on temperature rating.

jestridge
12-28-2011, 03:38 PM
That does sound cheap , a company that give us metal just installed a powder coating outfit, the price was around 2M for it. It a time involve process

speers90
12-28-2011, 09:59 PM
He replied and said the hi temp bbq powder coat they use is rated to 650 degrees. That ain't going to cut it!

I may just end up buying a spray gun and doing it myself. I already have an air compressor that will handle it and I am planning on building a whole hog cooker next year, so it is probably worth it to just buy the equipment.

Phrasty
12-28-2011, 10:30 PM
Get the equipment, You wont have to worry about it again! A well treated (oiled) hi temp paint is just as good as a powder coat IMO. and if anything happens to the finish you can always take 2 hours one afternoon and repaint.

Cheers

speers90
12-29-2011, 07:41 AM
Get the equipment, You wont have to worry about it again! A well treated (oiled) hi temp paint is just as good as a powder coat IMO. and if anything happens to the finish you can always take 2 hours one afternoon and repaint.

Cheers

Yeah I think you are right! Just the refinishing aspect alone has pretty much made my decision for me.

Thanks for all the input guys.