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View Full Version : Steaks...To Oil or Not To oil


zwylde1
12-15-2011, 12:58 PM
Hello Brethren,

Simple question to you. When preparing steaks to put on the grill do you coat them with oil or not before coating with seasonings? And what is your prefered oil? The ever popular EVOO?

Phrasty
12-15-2011, 01:07 PM
EVOO it is for me...

Cheers

Militant83
12-15-2011, 01:22 PM
I 2nd the EVOO... I use a light coat on all of my steaks

Skidder
12-15-2011, 01:25 PM
veggie oil it has a higher smoke rate than evoo i save the evoo for marinades ,salad etc.

Grillman
12-15-2011, 01:28 PM
I'm sure it's just a personal preference thing; but I never use any oil on steaks.

ggeilman
12-15-2011, 01:30 PM
Oil on steaks? Is this a regional thing?

speers90
12-15-2011, 01:38 PM
I haven't oiled the steaks but I do normally oil the grate before I toss the steaks on.

southernstyle
12-15-2011, 01:38 PM
i've done side by side and the only thing that was differant was the oiled steak had flare up unfer it for a couple minutes. as far as the quality of the steak. none

sandiegobbq
12-15-2011, 01:41 PM
A good rub is better than using oil.

caseydog
12-15-2011, 01:43 PM
I've tried all kinds of things, from oils to butter to a soak in Italian dressing. In the end, I discovered that I prefer my steak surface to be dry when it hits the fire. I sometimes even salt and pepper my steaks the day before cooking, and let it sit in the fridge to draw moisture out of the surface -- a mini dry age.

I like the nice crust I get on the steak when I grill a steak prepared like that over high heat. A tasty crust on the outside, and juicy medium-rare inside.

If a guest wants their steak done more (even well done), they still get a juicy, flavorful steak.

That's my own personal preference.

CD

wnkt
12-15-2011, 01:43 PM
I put some in the marinade, along with other things, but I don't coat them with oil

DaveMW
12-15-2011, 01:44 PM
Never have used oil, never will. I just don't see any benefit that could come from it. If you do oil your steak I agree with skidder, evoo can't handle those temps, you would be better off using regular olive oil.

DaveMW
12-15-2011, 01:45 PM
caseydog I am headed to your place, you cook them the way I like them.:-D

troytime
12-15-2011, 02:40 PM
i usually oil the grates with grapeseed oil

in my experience, a dry surface steak gets better grill marks

i wouldn't worry about evoo/veg and smokepoints if you're oiling the meat. the oil is to get a better thermal connection between the grate and the meat, and to help prevent sticking.
EVOO tastes a lot better than veg oil. WHen i oil meat, i use EVOO.

smokeyw
12-15-2011, 03:02 PM
I put a little canola oil on my steak just so the seasoning stays on. It also keeps the steak from sticking when you first slap it on there. Not very much and not for seasoning. I always oil my food and never the grate.

azken
12-15-2011, 03:19 PM
I've had some success in getting the crust with salt/pepper/evoo but will try CD's method of s/p refrigerated overnite...never thought about drawing surface moisture out...thanks

SirPorkaLot
12-15-2011, 03:21 PM
Dry steak @ room temp.

Moisture of any type (water, oil, etc.) will work against you when grilling a fine piece of meat like a steak.

caseydog
12-15-2011, 03:26 PM
I've had some success in getting the crust with salt/pepper/evoo but will try CD's method of s/p refrigerated overnite...never thought about drawing surface moisture out...thanks

I tried it for the first time about two months back. I salted a prime Ribeye steak with fine sea salt, set it on a cooling rack, and put it in the fridge. About thirty minutes before cook time, I pulled it out, patted it with a paper towel, and added my fresh cracked pepper.

I do it that way all the time, now.

CD

markdtn
12-15-2011, 03:48 PM
I always use oil in the marinade.

fweck
12-15-2011, 03:56 PM
I used to use EVOO, decided I like them better with just simple seasonings

SirPorkaLot
12-15-2011, 04:00 PM
I always use oil in the marinade.

You marinate steaks? :shocked:

deguerre
12-15-2011, 04:04 PM
In the end, I discovered that I prefer my steak surface to be dry when it hits the fire. I sometimes even salt and pepper my steaks the day before cooking, and let it sit in the fridge to draw moisture out of the surface -- a mini dry age.

I like the nice crust I get on the steak when I grill a steak prepared like that over high heat. A tasty crust on the outside, and juicy medium-rare inside.

If a guest wants their steak done more (even well done), they still get a juicy, flavorful steak.

That's my own personal preference.

CD

This is what we do too. Put the rub on and air dry in the fridge overnight. No oil.

El Ropo
12-15-2011, 04:17 PM
I've rubbed 'em with zesty, or spicy Italian dressing and had great success. It is cheaper than other oils, and does a fine job. It works with all meats.

TIMMAY
12-15-2011, 05:18 PM
I have not given much thought to oiling my steak before the heat. depending on my mood it's salt and pepper, or montreal steak seasoning. I have not been afraid to use the slightest bit of dale's marinade. Have to be real careful though that stuff can be overpowering. I use maybe a capful or two at a time. If I use Dale's I use only pepper before the heat.

Soulman1282
12-15-2011, 05:28 PM
For what it's worth, I doubt you'll ever see a grill man in a steakhouse oiling steaks. season the meat, oil the grill. This is how they've done it in ever restaurant I've worked in. Although sometimes they will brush a cooked steak with melted butter before pulling it off the grill to re-moisten the outside of the steak.

buccaneer
12-15-2011, 05:54 PM
For what it's worth, I doubt you'll ever see a grill man in a steakhouse oiling steaks. season the meat, oil the grill. This is how they've done it in ever restaurant I've worked in. Although sometimes they will brush a cooked steak with melted butter before pulling it off the grill to re-moisten the outside of the steak.

Doesn't mean it is the best way, just means it is the current level of common understanding.:wink:
I've never eaten a steakhouse steak that comes close to some of my learned BBQ friends steaks, maybe Neil Perry matches it but doesn't surpass it.
Guess how Neil Perry does his steaks?
:wink:

troytime
12-15-2011, 08:13 PM
For what it's worth, I doubt you'll ever see a grill man in a steakhouse oiling steaks. season the meat, oil the grill. This is how they've done it in ever restaurant I've worked in. Although sometimes they will brush a cooked steak with melted butter before pulling it off the grill to re-moisten the outside of the steak.

How many steak houses have you worked in?

Oiling food before grilling is not a new technique, and it's certainly valid.
It's really a matter of preference and style.

thirdeye
12-15-2011, 08:38 PM
I'm an oiler.

ShutYrMouth
12-15-2011, 08:41 PM
never have, never will.


put butter on top a couple times.

wyocurt
12-15-2011, 08:58 PM
I oil the grates and keep the steaks dry, get good grill markes and then season just before they are done to your liking and taste.

CTSmokehouse
12-15-2011, 09:11 PM
Hello Brethren,

Simple question to you. When preparing steaks to put on the grill do you coat them with oil or not before coating with seasonings? And what is your prefered oil? The ever popular EVOO?

Went to a seminar on Chateaubriand recently...learned that EVOO is for finishing.. same flash point as butter...seems Canola is the choice for oil and unsalted butter for cooking ...

I coat the steaks with oil, salt, pepper, garlic, fresh herbs....

Yours in BBQ,

Cliff

jasonjax
12-15-2011, 09:12 PM
I use EVOO. I normally throw some garlic salt and cracked black pepper, rub that in, and drizzle some oil. Sometimes I reverse that process depending on how many beers, glasses of wine, and or scotches were involved in the cooking process.

I will however have to try a batch with just garlic salt and pepper and see how they turn out crust wise since I have been doing it the above mentioned way for about 20 years now.

buccaneer
12-15-2011, 09:18 PM
Went to a seminar on Chateaubriand recently...learned that EVOO is for finishing.. same flash point as butter...seems Canola is the choice for oil and unsalted butter for cooking ...

I coat the steaks with oil, salt, pepper, garlic, fresh herbs....

Yours in BBQ,

Cliff

Get your money back.
Seriously.

southernstyle
12-15-2011, 09:23 PM
canola definately better than evoo, but unnessesary on a steak. just does not make a differance. imo of course.

buccaneer
12-15-2011, 09:35 PM
canola definately better than evoo, but unnessesary on a steak. just does not make a differance. imo of course.

I'll bite.
Give a single rational reason why canola oil would be better than EVOO?
Perhaps googling hydrogen and carbon chains in relation to heat, and the effect of high polyphenol content in oils might get you started.
Canola has a lower smoke point and BTW, unless you are deep frying steaks and chateaubriand, it is completely and utterly irrelevant.

What am I doing.
I swore I wouldn't waste any more time double posting science on the same subject.
Up to you brothers but I recommend doing some reading on it.

Pyle's BBQ
12-15-2011, 09:43 PM
AB oils his steak.

How to properly cook a Rib-Eye Steak In a Cast Iron pan - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3yX1Q3x9Cs4)

Pyle's BBQ
12-15-2011, 09:53 PM
I'll bite.
Give a single rational reason why canola oil would be better than EVOO?
Perhaps googling hydrogen and carbon chains in relation to heat, and the effect of high polyphenol content in oils might get you started.
Canola has a lower smoke point and BTW, unless you are deep frying steaks and chateaubriand, it is completely and utterly irrelevant.

What am I doing.
I swore I wouldn't waste any more time double posting science on the same subject.
Up to you brothers but I recommend doing some reading on it.

Canola is cheaper than EVOO.
I'm confused. In the video I posted above, there is a chart at 3:00 minutes that shows EVOO has a lower smoke point of 375F where canola's smoke point is 435F. Now I have not checked this on Wikipedia so the show could be wrong.

It really would not matter because the temp we are cooking at over the flame the oil will burn anyway.

One last thing, I worked in a kitchen 20 years ago and was being trained by a CIA trained Ex-Chef. We oiled all the steaks and then seasoned them. We also oiled the grill. IMO oiling gets the great grill marks and that crust people are looking for on a steak.

sitnfat
12-15-2011, 10:06 PM
I bet y'all use steak sauce too :-P :crazy:

FromthePitBBQ
12-15-2011, 10:07 PM
When I do steaks on the grill I keep it really simple. Kosher salt, fresh ground black pepper on the meat and oil the grates with EVOO or vegetable oil just prior to putting the meat on. Once done about a 1/4" pat of butter on one side while it sits and rests (about 5 mins).

Now a steak sounds AWESOME!!!!

Pyle's BBQ
12-15-2011, 10:19 PM
I bet y'all use steak sauce too :-P :crazy:

No sauce, no marinade. The beef I get doesn't need it.

HB-BBQ
12-15-2011, 10:39 PM
put butter on top a couple times.
I grew up as a kid doing this and still use a slice occasionally on my steaks. I have used oil a few times in the past but was never impressed with the results. I guess i should try it again and experiment with some different oils.

Boshizzle
12-15-2011, 10:46 PM
This one was oiled -

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=491&pictureid=4524

This one wasn't -

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=491&pictureid=4607

So, who cares?

As long as the grates are oiled, I don't think it makes a difference.

buccaneer
12-15-2011, 11:26 PM
Canola is cheaper than EVOO.
I'm confused. In the video I posted above, there is a chart at 3:00 minutes that shows EVOO has a lower smoke point of 375F where canola's smoke point is 435F. Now I have not checked this on Wikipedia so the show could be wrong.



It's wrong.
Notice his eyes flicking up to read the board, he has a team helping with this stuff and if you look around you will find websites promoting different oils always boosting their own by downgrading others.
I trust engineers who have specialized equipment to test and give results over anyone else.
Case in point, one oil website claimed the smoke point of EVOO at below hot tap water.:crazy:
According to engineer tests, unrefined canola smoke point is 225F/107C
Semi Refined canola is 350f/177C about the same as EVOO
Refined Canola is 400F/204C but refined OO is 468F/242C

Bucc

Hoss
12-15-2011, 11:42 PM
NOPE!!! Salt,sear,season,rest, roast.Anything OTHER than salt will burn when searing at high temps. :wink: Some folks call it Trex.

Hoss
12-15-2011, 11:46 PM
AB oils his steak.

How to properly cook a Rib-Eye Steak In a Cast Iron pan - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3yX1Q3x9Cs4)


He is a,nevermind.Sellin stuff.

Pyle's BBQ
12-15-2011, 11:49 PM
Thanks for clearing that up Buc. I did do some research, like any normal person might do. What I found is that there are ranges of smoke points and no set one temp. One site did a test of EVOO they had at home and their temps were at or a little higher than 350F. One site did say that marketers will overstate the real smoke point. Thanks for the education. That is why I come here and love reading your posts.

Hoss
12-15-2011, 11:50 PM
I'll bite.
Give a single rational reason why canola oil would be better than EVOO?
Perhaps googling hydrogen and carbon chains in relation to heat, and the effect of high polyphenol content in oils might get you started.
Canola has a lower smoke point and BTW, unless you are deep frying steaks and chateaubriand, it is completely and utterly irrelevant.

What am I doing.
I swore I wouldn't waste any more time double posting science on the same subject.
Up to you brothers but I recommend doing some reading on it.

Cause it's CHEAPER!!! And oiling a steak is USLESS.IMNSHO.If ya gotta oil it,ya need to grind it. :tape:

buccaneer
12-16-2011, 12:04 AM
Thanks for clearing that up Buc. I did do some research, like any normal person might do. What I found is that there are ranges of smoke points and no set one temp. One site did a test of EVOO they had at home and their temps were at or a little higher than 350F. One site did say that marketers will overstate the real smoke point. Thanks for the education. That is why I come here and love reading your posts.

THAT has me feeling real good!
Makes it all worthwhile....thanks brother!
:grouphug:

buccaneer
12-16-2011, 12:09 AM
Cause it's CHEAPER!!! And oiling a steak is USLESS.IMNSHO.If ya gotta oil it,ya need to grind it. :tape:

Sump oil is cheaper still HOSS, knock yourself out bro:-P

Ironically, right below the youtube vid was a Gordon Ramsey vid doing a steak...er...yep... EVOO.:laugh::becky:
How many Michelin Stars has he had now... :angel:
please don't say that doesn't count, it is the very gauge we measure by

jimithing78
12-16-2011, 12:15 AM
I tried it for the first time about two months back. I salted a prime Ribeye steak with fine sea salt, set it on a cooling rack, and put it in the fridge. About thirty minutes before cook time, I pulled it out, patted it with a paper towel, and added my fresh cracked pepper.

I do it that way all the time, now.

CD

Basically how I do it except I don't go through the trouble of a cooling rack. I can see how that'd help. For those of you who haven't tried it you should. The salting a day before is really outstanding. The meat will only absorb so much of the salt so you don't have to worry about your steak being too salty.

I'm not a fan of oil on anything I put on the grill really. I generally cook at a pretty high temp when grilling and any oil I put on is just going to cause more of a flare up and is going to smoke/burn - making the meat taste bad. When I'm cooking chicken or something that's got a low fat content I might wipe the grate with a paper towel moistened with vegetable oil just to prevent the meat from sticking but that's about it.

tortaboy
12-16-2011, 12:15 AM
Oil/Don't Oil

There is no wrong answer to a personal preference question.

If you like it, do it...If you don't don't.

If I wanna put ketchup on a well done steak, who's to say it's wrong?

buccaneer
12-16-2011, 12:18 AM
Oil/Don't Oil

There is no wrong answer to a personal preference question.

If you like it, do it...If you don't don't.

If I wanna put ketchup on a well done steak, who's to say it's wrong?

Me.
That's what I'm here for, to help poor misguided and deluded souls back to the troot.:-P
No hope for you though Jerry.:tsk::heh:

tortaboy
12-16-2011, 12:25 AM
Me.
That's what I'm here for, to help poor misguided and deluded souls back to the troot.:-P
No hope for you though Jerry.:tsk::heh:

Hey Buc,

What the hell is a troot? You're either too sophisticated for google, or you're just makin up your own language. :heh:

buccaneer
12-16-2011, 12:41 AM
Hey Buc,

What the hell is a troot? You're either too sophisticated for google, or you're just makin up your own language. :heh:

Vincent Furnier taught me that word down at The Department Of Yoot.:wink:

landarc
12-16-2011, 01:18 AM
It doesn't matter how many stars Ramsay has. Is it Aussie wagyu or not? :becky:

buccaneer
12-16-2011, 01:30 AM
It doesn't matter how many stars Ramsay has. Is it Aussie wagyu or not? :becky:

:laugh: Good point, it isn't!

CTSmokehouse
12-16-2011, 03:04 AM
Get your money back.
Seriously.

You are entitled to your opinion.

Fact is that EVOO, not olive oil and butter have low flash points.

EVOO is used to finish for it's flavor or for dressings or sauces. It is relatively expensive compared to Canola which has a much higher flash point. Clarified butter has a much higher flash point than butter.
Unsalted butter is higher quality and better for cooking than salted butter which has more impurities and gives less control of salt in the cooking process.

I cook with EVOO alot and like it's taste. For some palates, cooking with EVOO imparts too much olive oil taste and overwhelmes the key ingredient...

When grilling at a high searing temperature, that taste is diminished and is not as distinguishable. So grilling with expensive EVOO is for some a waste of money.

It is about personal tastes and preferences.

For $15.00 per person, we tried 3 wines pared to the dishes, numerous artisinal cheeses, learned about the cooking of and tasted shrimp bisque, chateaubriand with sauted potatoes and hericot vert, flourless chocolate cake with mocha and crystalized sugar filling with chocolate ganache and a winter punch.

BTW I grill Beefsteak Florentine alot...

In Italy, the justly famous bistecca alla florentina is nothing more than a thick porterhouse steak seasoned with salt and pepper and rubbed with extra virgin olive oil, and grilled over hard wood coals. It is simply garnished with lemon wedges. Minced garlic is optional. In Italy what sets it apart is the the exquisitely tender and very flavorful Chianina beef, which is usually cooked blood rare. It is also very expensive, hence the EVOO splurge...

It was a very nice evening, very entertaining and informative and in my opinion worth the $15.00.

Yours in BBQ,

Cliff

buccaneer
12-16-2011, 04:06 AM
You are entitled to your opinion.

Fact is that EVOO, not olive oil and butter have low flash points.

EVOO is used to finish for it's flavor or for dressings or sauces. It is relatively expensive compared to Canola which has a much higher flash point. Clarified butter has a much higher flash point than butter.
Unsalted butter is higher quality and better for cooking than salted butter which has more impurities and gives less control of salt in the cooking process.

I cook with EVOO alot and like it's taste. For some palates, cooking with EVOO imparts too much olive oil taste and overwhelmes the key ingredient...

When grilling at a high searing temperature, that taste is diminished and is not as distinguishable. So grilling with expensive EVOO is for some a waste of money.

It is about personal tastes and preferences.

For $15.00 per person, we tried 3 wines pared to the dishes, numerous artisinal cheeses, learned about the cooking of and tasted shrimp bisque, chateaubriand with sauted potatoes and hericot vert, flourless chocolate cake with mocha and crystalized sugar filling with chocolate ganache and a winter punch.

BTW I grill Beefsteak Florentine alot...

In Italy, the justly famous bistecca alla florentina is nothing more than a thick porterhouse steak seasoned with salt and pepper and rubbed with extra virgin olive oil, and grilled over hard wood coals. It is simply garnished with lemon wedges. Minced garlic is optional. In Italy what sets it apart is the the exquisitely tender and very flavorful Chianina beef, which is usually cooked blood rare. It is also very expensive, hence the EVOO splurge...

It was a very nice evening, very entertaining and informative and in my opinion worth the $15.00.

Yours in BBQ,

Cliff

Okay Cliff, it was worth $15 but you know that wasn't the point I was making.
I know about Chianina beefcattle and Bistecca Alla Florentina, it isn't only in Italia but right here in Australia too. Of course, we don't call the cut a porterhouse. :rolleyes:(I note it is cooked over fire rubbed with EVOO!:-D)

I was talking only about the false science they taught you, the smoke point and flash point temps of EVOO and canola.
Already refuted by food engineers but as you say, we believe who we want to and that forms our opinion.
Cheers Cliff.

LMAJ
12-16-2011, 04:46 AM
Noi oil, only salt and maybe a little pepper for me.

SmokinAussie
12-16-2011, 04:54 AM
You are all tools...:becky:

No... seriously all tools...:becky:

You marinade or rub your meat any way you want.

You get a spray can of any oil you can find that comes in a spray can.

You get your grill hot and spray the can on the grate.

You will get a flare up that burns off all the residue and will leave you with a NICE CLEAN GRILL! (That is if you were such a tool that you didn't clean it the night before after you took off the last grilling effort) You might need a small round of steel wool and a paper towel to make it really clean.

Then you lay down your meat.

Do this and you get that nice release from the grill when you have a good sear.

That's all you have to do.:shocked:

Thanks.

Bill

zwylde1
12-16-2011, 06:42 AM
WOW! Thanks for all of the responses guys. For what it is worth, I did up a couple of fillets last night, lightly coated them with some EEVO and the hit 2 of them with some Oak Ridge Santa Fe rub and dusted mine with HDD. Came out awesome.

But you all did give me several really good things to try....especially like Caseydogs method. Next time a steak hits my grill that is what I will be doing. :thumb:

buccaneer
12-16-2011, 06:45 AM
:heh:that's the spirit!

jasonjax
12-16-2011, 07:38 AM
Scroll down this page and look at how much "olive oil" can vary for smoke points. Thus the confusion in my opinion. http://missvickie.com/howto/spices/oils.html

smokeyw
12-16-2011, 08:21 AM
Thanks for that link. It certainly explains the difference in opinions.

I didn't realize corn oil had a 450 degree smoke point. If you merely want to put a little oil on meat so that the seasoning adheres and not for flavor, this would be a good choice since it has virtually no taste or smell.

Scroll down this page and look at how much "olive oil" can vary for smoke points. Thus the confusion in my opinion. http://missvickie.com/howto/spices/oils.html

augie
12-16-2011, 08:38 AM
FWIW, I let my steaks come to room temp on the counter, THEN hit them with a coat of salt for a half hour or so before putting them on the grill. I sprinkle a little rub (low/no salt since I've already salted them) on the side away from the grill, then on the other side at the turn.

Sometimes I'll put a dab of herbed butter on while they rest and sometimes I won't.

Bottom line, if you like them the way you do them, then it's the "right way".

ggeilman
12-16-2011, 09:47 AM
EVOO. Had to google it to even know what it is. Tells you I never use it. We use canola when we use oil and never on our steaks. Although I forgot the last time I could actually afford a steak!

cgaengineer
12-16-2011, 10:49 AM
I'm sure it's just a personal preference thing; but I never use any oil on steaks.

I never oil them either...or the grate for that matter. They will release in about 2 mins on a hot grill.

cgaengineer
12-16-2011, 10:53 AM
Course salt/pepper and garlic is all for me...then a butter sauce for the steak. I would never marinate a steak...put it this way, if a steak has to be marinated its not really a "steak" in my opinion.

I have tried rosemary and black pepper and I like that on a steak as well...turns out good even if you use a cast iron pan.

CTSmokehouse
12-16-2011, 08:08 PM
Okay Cliff, it was worth $15 but you know that wasn't the point I was making.
I know about Chianina beefcattle and Bistecca Alla Florentina, it isn't only in Italia but right here in Australia too. Of course, we don't call the cut a porterhouse. :rolleyes:(I note it is cooked over fire rubbed with EVOO!:-D)

I was talking only about the false science they taught you, the smoke point and flash point temps of EVOO and canola.
Already refuted by food engineers but as you say, we believe who we want to and that forms our opinion.
Cheers Cliff.

Cheers,

It was a holiday cooking class taught by a very well known and appreciated French Chef, French born and trained in classic French cuisine, 40 years in the trade ...who by his own admission is very frugal.... "I have very deep pockets, but my arms are too short". Flash points aside, his message is that in Mediterranean cooking, Olive oil especially EVOO is about terroir, where it comes from, it is very important to their culture, whether it be France, Spain, Greece or Italy...it is usually used as a finish rather than to cook with...it is cherished...I cook with EVOO all the time from Costco (Wholesale Warehouse)...to me it is oil...I like the taste....

Adam Perry Lang, who the NY Times says cooks the best steaks in New York City, has Daisy May's BBQ, attended the Culinary Institute of America, worked under Daniel Boulud at Le Cirque and helped him launch Restaurant Daniel, worked with Guy Savoy and writes for Food and Wine Magazine for grilling, is a BBQ Champion and is his book "Serious Barbeque" in his recipe for Butter-Bombed Porterhouse..."season lightly with salt and pepper and using your hands or a brush, evenly but lightly coat with Canola oil". In the recipe he also uses Unsalted butter...it is all about building layers of flavor...

The key is that the oil helps hold the seasoning...lightly...too much and you are not going to get a sear but get a fire or fry...

I think we are on the same line...I have learned long ago, give different chefs the same ingredients, cooked in the same cooking device and you will get different results...

Yours in BBQ,

Cliff

buccaneer
12-16-2011, 08:32 PM
Chefs who use and love EVOO also use other oils because if you have complex marinades and flavours then you want a neutral tasting oil.
If that recipe you mention is such a recipe it will call for the chef to choose an oil other than EVOO, and canola is an economical choice.
It has the same tolerances to heat also (according to the research I believe:wink:)
I do too, I use grapeseed oil, Rice bran oil and a variety of others depending on the desired outcome.
Please note everyone, I am only questioning the factual aspects of oils in this thread, I don't suggest steaks must be cooked with or without, or that one way is 'right', I just got caught up when it was suggested canola is better and that EVOO has a too low smoke point for grilling a steak.
Even red palm oil has it's uses.
Sump oil...not so much.:hand:

Brizz
12-16-2011, 08:45 PM
Excellent info here but I'm gonna change directions. Does anybody else hit their steaks with a little cayenne? I started doing this a few years ago and the subtle pop it brings to the party is awesome.

toadhunter911
12-16-2011, 09:13 PM
All the restaurants/clubs I worked at had their own version of a "blessing" we put on steaks and chops before they hit the grill. The common ingredients in all were salt, cracked pepper, garlic, and EVOO. Some used shallots, some fresh rosemary or other fresh herbs.

jimmyinsd
12-16-2011, 09:27 PM
my 2 cents on the subject....from a SD beef producer....

thanks for eating beef.:-D

do you prefer coke or pepsi? chevy or ford? winter or summer?

imo peoples personal tastes are as varied as the questions. popular cooking processes are for the most part are as acceptable as they are rarely unique in that they are "borrowed" from some unnamed, underpaid, back yard artist that just didnt have a face for TV, or the recognition.

i have had meat done more ways than i care to count and i would bet that i liked 99% of them enough to eat them again and enjoy the experience. if we truly liked our food prepared only one way, why the hell do we waste so much of our time searching for better methods to cook it?

post thought: following the lines of "never trust a bald barber, or a skinny cook" how many people have seen a fat french man? :razz:

thanks for those that have given me some new ideas, for the record my goto with beef steak and burgers is 1/3 onion salt, 1/3 course grnd black pepper, and 1/3 garlic powder. i hit the meat when i unrapped it on one side and then hit the other side when i throw it on the grill. i havent had a steak house give me better flavor yet, but i still search.:-D

CTSmokehouse
12-16-2011, 09:35 PM
Chefs who use and love EVOO also use other oils because if you have complex marinades and flavours then you want a neutral tasting oil.
If that recipe you mention is such a recipe it will call for the chef to choose an oil other than EVOO, and canola is an economical choice.
It has the same tolerances to heat also (according to the research I believe:wink:)
I do too, I use grapeseed oil, Rice bran oil and a variety of others depending on the desired outcome.
Please note everyone, I am only questioning the factual aspects of oils in this thread, I don't suggest steaks must be cooked with or without, or that one way is 'right', I just got caught up when it was suggested canola is better and that EVOO has a too low smoke point for grilling a steak.
Even red palm oil has it's uses.
Sump oil...not so much.:hand:

Cheers,

The thread was as I understand was whether to oil or not...

I think that alot has to do with the preference of the cook...

I appreciate your input and your opinion...

...neutral, economic oil Canola

Never tried red palm oil, am going to try canola...sump oil? Not sure...

Do know that I organized a grilling, BBQ through Rotary International for over 200 people, represented was Australia, USA, and South Africa, the top 3 grilling countries in the world in no particular order...BBQ Ribs, Pulled Pork, Sausage, Potluck, Dessert etc...

Result: Awesome!

BTW... it it almost summer down under?

Yours in BBQ,

Cliff

buccaneer
12-16-2011, 09:59 PM
I never use canola myself, rape seed oil is not fit for human consumption and to make it so fit it undergoes genetic modification to make canola oil, is my understanding.
Not for me or mine.

I also like to hear other views and so thanks to all who participate.

The Sethefrikaans are really good BBQers too, love their sausages and they are pretty common here.

Yes, summer is here and a cracker of a day today.
It has arrived very late this year but it gets so hot that none of us mind if summer is shortened by a month or so.
We get summer weather even in winter here, pretty awesome climate.
I just saw a show with Stephen Fry driving through Wisconson, freezing his bread rolls off and tasting cheese.
I don't know how you guys survive in that kind of weather.:faint:

RevZiLLa
12-17-2011, 03:00 AM
Depends on what I feel like doing. Both are good. You don't put on very much oil anyway. Burning is so NOT an issue in the real world with a few drops of EVOO rubbed around.

gtsum
12-17-2011, 09:36 PM
EVOO is not good for high heat grilling...use Virgin Olive Oil or Olive Oil instead..holds up to the intense heat better

troytime
12-17-2011, 10:30 PM
EVOO is not good for high heat grilling...use Virgin Olive Oil or Olive Oil instead..holds up to the intense heat better

if you're actually grilling over high heat, all of those oils are going to burn up just as fast.

tjus77
12-18-2011, 06:28 AM
post thought: following the lines of "never trust a bald barber, or a skinny cook" how many people have seen a fat french man? :razz:



Does a cajun count? lol

I oil with EVOO and was taught that by a chef. He stated it was to help sear the meat if you don't have super hot fires like a resturant would. The oil would cause controlled flare ups, that would normally happen on a super hot fire (as the fat renders). It is all personal preference and I've never had a complaint. I agree, to each his own, which was the original intent of the post I believe.

smokeyw
12-19-2011, 05:57 AM
I tend to agree that the smoke temp of the oil does not matter much if any. Besides, what is the smoke temp of beef fat? I'm sure it is probably quite low.

if you're actually grilling over high heat, all of those oils are going to burn up just as fast.

DaChief
12-19-2011, 08:03 AM
I oil the grate, not the steak. Salt, pepper & garlic for me....and sometimes ketchup :tape:

augie
12-19-2011, 08:33 AM
I oil the grate, not the steak. Salt, pepper & garlic for me....and sometimes ketchup :tape:

How do you like your grate?

I've had trouble getting mine tender enough to eat - maybe I just need stronger jaws and teeth!

;)

Quemaster
12-19-2011, 02:15 PM
Canola oil and favorite dry rub on everything that hits the grill or smoker. Spices blend very well with the oil and helps keep from sticking.