PDA

View Full Version : Pepper question


kpdiver
11-29-2011, 04:56 PM
I'm hoping some of you awesome Qers and pepper connoisseurs can help me here. I've been making ABT'S for my family and friends lately and though the majority of them love them, a few just can't handle the heat of the jalapeno pepper. Is there a smaller pepper out there with less heat? I thought of using green bell peppers but they are usually pretty big and would take to much filling. They also would be more like a meal than an appetizer. I've grown many varieties of peppers but have never seen mild peppers in the size range of jalapenos. Any suggestions?

Thank you.


KP

buccaneer
11-29-2011, 05:00 PM
If our differences in language (names), here I would choose the Paprika, a smaller size than bell and sweet more than spicy but still has capsaicin flavour.

caseydog
11-29-2011, 05:03 PM
I grow mild banana peppers, and they are good stuffed. They are longer than a jalepeņo, but about the same size around.

CD

Midnight Smoke
11-29-2011, 05:09 PM
Sweet yellow peppers are good, sometimes spicy but not normally. Hatch peppers are good too.

kpdiver
11-29-2011, 05:13 PM
If our differences in language (names), here I would choose the Paprika, a smaller size than bell and sweet more than spicy but still has capsaicin flavour.

I use paprika powder all the time but have never seen the actual pepper for sale. I would like to try it for sure. Thank you.

I grow mild banana peppers, and they are good stuffed. They are longer than a jalepeņo, but about the same size around.

CD

I grow the semi hot Hungarian wax pepper every year and they are about 5 to 6 inches long. Is this the same style pepper with less capsaicin? Kind of yellow/green in color?

The_Kapn
11-29-2011, 05:21 PM
Are you removing the viens and seeds?

I slice them in half (boats) and clean them well.

Jalapeno flavor without the heat.

TIM

kpdiver
11-29-2011, 05:25 PM
Sweet yellow peppers are good, sometimes spicy but not normally. Hatch peppers are good too.

I've never seen the hatch peppers before. Are they common in most grocery stores or more of a specialty produce store?

DaveMW
11-29-2011, 05:25 PM
How do you choose the jalapenos you are using? Look at each pepper, the ones with white striations are hotter than the smooth ones with no striations. Like them hot get the ones loaded with striations, less heat no striations. That will make a big difference along with being careful to remove all seeds and the whitish colored ribs in each pepper. I'm betting that if you buy the right ones and clean them good that that after awhile in the smoker they'll be what you are looking for. Wear gloves when cleaning the peppers. Nothing says ouch like rubbing your eyes later or worse going to take a leak. :shocked:

kpdiver
11-29-2011, 05:37 PM
Are you removing the viens and seeds?

I slice them in half (boats) and clean them well.

Jalapeno flavor without the heat.

TIM

How do you choose the jalapenos you are using? Look at each pepper, the ones with white striations are hotter than the smooth ones with no striations. Like them hot get the ones loaded with striations, less heat no striations. That will make a big difference along with being careful to remove all seeds and the whitish colored ribs in each pepper. I'm betting that if you buy the right ones and clean them good that that after awhile in the smoker they'll be what you are looking for. Wear gloves when cleaning the peppers. Nothing says ouch like rubbing your eyes later or worse going to take a leak. :shocked:

Yes I remove the seeds and ribs. I cut mine a little differently to hold the cheese in a little better. I cap them then take a thin fillet knife to remove the ribs and seeds then put the cap back on the pepper it came off of for a good fit. When I wrap the bacon I go around the pepper then back over the cap and stem with the stem punching through the bacon. It holds real well with no toothpicks. The last ones I did were out of my garden and come to think of it they had the striation you mentioned. I never knew that was a way of gaging the heat. Thanks for that info.
X 2 on the rubber gloves. Learned that the hard way years ago. Woo hoo! :doh:

El Pistolero
11-29-2011, 05:38 PM
I've never seen the hatch peppers before. Are they common in most grocery stores or more of a specialty produce store?

Peppers from Hatch are usually only available from late August thru mid October, and mostly only via mail order, tho some stores carry them for a brief time during harvest here in Texas. They're similar to anaheims.

I use sweet banana peppers for stuffing when the kids are around, but there are some mild varieties of jalapeno that they can stand also.

Saiko
11-29-2011, 05:43 PM
Poblanos would be perfect IMO. They are traditionally used in chili relleno and are mild with lots of flavor. They vary in size, but the smaller ones would be perfect. If you can't find them in your local grocery store, check out any Mexican grocery.

Just an FYI, but dried poblanos are called ancho, and ground ancho chili is one of my all time favorite spices.

http://www.getrealdenver.com/wp-content/photos/poblano.jpg

kpdiver
11-29-2011, 05:44 PM
I probably won't find any here in Ohio then. Thanks for the info.


KP

kpdiver
11-29-2011, 05:47 PM
Poblanos would be perfect IMO. They are traditionally used in chili relleno and are mild with lots of flavor. They vary in size, but the smaller ones would be perfect. If you can't find them in your local grocery store, check out any Mexican grocery.

Just an FYI, but dried poblanos are called ancho, and ground ancho chili is one of my all time favorite spices.

http://www.getrealdenver.com/wp-content/photos/poblano.jpg

I have seen these before. I'll see if I can find some of all the peppers mentioned and give them all a try. Thanks to all ye Brethren.

KP

kpdiver
11-29-2011, 05:53 PM
Woops, quoted the wrong text. Ignore me!

No problem...I was referring to the Hatch peppers. Poblanos I have seen here before.


KP

fingerlickin'
11-29-2011, 06:04 PM
I've gotten mini sweet peppers at one of the wholesale stores. I can't remember if it was Sam's, Costco or BJ's. I think I may have even seen them at Walmart the other day. They were the perfect size for ABT's, virtually identical to Jalapeno's minus the heat. The left side of this pan is sweet peps.

http://i1217.photobucket.com/albums/dd392/shellddy/IMG_1169.jpg

kpdiver
11-29-2011, 06:11 PM
I'll be checking my local Walmart this week for all the mentioned peppers. Thanks to everyone. :clap2:

KP

bizznessman
11-29-2011, 06:22 PM
I've never seen the hatch peppers before. Are they common in most grocery stores or more of a specialty produce store?


Hatch peppers originally came from Hatch, New Mexico but are now cultivated in other areas. Usually only available in markets in the SW but have become more popular and are sometimes available in chain specialty stores in the late Fall.

If you ever get the chance check out their festival. It's HOT!!! :mad2:

http://www.hatchchilefest.com/

Midnight Smoke
11-29-2011, 06:25 PM
I've never seen the hatch peppers before. Are they common in most grocery stores or more of a specialty produce store?

Not the best picture. This is a mixture of Jalapeno, Yellow and Hatch.

http://i85.photobucket.com/albums/k66/photolinks/BBQ/Peppers/Picture016.jpg



They vary from 4" to 8" long. Might be hard to find them there, but a mentioned Anaheim's are good too and may be available to you.

Militant83
11-29-2011, 06:29 PM
I had just smoke up some stuffed Yellow Hungarian wax peppers the other day and they were very mild and still had a good flavor.

WvSmoke
11-29-2011, 06:47 PM
If you are growing your own peppers, you could always grow the "no heat" jalapenos. Also, if growing your own regular jalapenos, keeping them well watered and picking them as soon as they are large enough will reduce the heat.

realspaazz
11-29-2011, 06:54 PM
I love the mini sweet peppers. The cubanelle pepper is another nice pepper, lots of pepper flavor with no heat.

RICK Allen
11-29-2011, 07:14 PM
Do not where I heard this, but appereantly if you soak your peppers overnite after cleaning them, in 7up it will take a lot of the heat out of them

kpdiver
11-29-2011, 07:33 PM
Alot of great suggestions, thank you. I've grown the cubanelle as well and they would make a good choice. I'm hoping I can find a few of these peppers suggested this time of year because I was hoping to make them for New Years Eve.


KP

Funky D
11-29-2011, 07:54 PM
My two suggestions would be....

1. Try cutting the peppers in half. I know it's not as pretty as a capped pepper, but it allows you to up the cheese to pepper ratio, and that will help mitigate the heat (I always seem to bite capped peppers and have the cheese shoot out... wrong end! doh...).

2. Slowwww cooking. Our best peppers get lots of smoke, and are slow and low. The bacon is crispy, but if the peppers have ANY crunch left in them, they have been cooked too fast, and there is still plenty of juice left in the pepper, which is the conduit for the heat. Granted, depending on our audience, sometimes we'll purposely run a batch thru a little quicker for people who like the bite, but for the general public, we'll try to get a 2+ hour smoke on them, and they come out very very mild. Even complete hot-o-phobics love em.

Just .02

D

morgaj1
11-29-2011, 07:58 PM
Won't help with New Years, but if you grow your own, try the "Jalepeno Mild Tam." It is about 1/3 of the way down this page:

http://www.pepperjoe.com/shoppingcart/html/pepper.html

bbqbull
11-29-2011, 08:04 PM
I have been told that if you slice your peppers, seed and devein them.
Then soak them in 7-up for 12 hrs before using them really helps reduce the residual heat left in them.
It is on my to do list very very soon.

kihrer
11-29-2011, 08:20 PM
Buy these since you can grow your own. http://www.dianeseeds.com/pepper-tam-jalapeno.html

These are Texas A&M mild jalapenos. they range from 500 to about 1500 Scoville.

martyleach
11-29-2011, 08:28 PM
Poblanos would be perfect IMO. They are traditionally used in chili relleno and are mild with lots of flavor. They vary in size, but the smaller ones would be perfect. If you can't find them in your local grocery store, check out any Mexican grocery.

Just an FYI, but dried poblanos are called ancho, and ground ancho chili is one of my all time favorite spices.

http://www.getrealdenver.com/wp-content/photos/poblano.jpg

They substitute Pasillas for Poblanos out here. The look the same to me.

parrdist
11-29-2011, 08:30 PM
I have done the 7up/ sprite soak and it works. Also you can use the left over soda in a spray bottle to add a little heat to your next Q, if you want.

martyleach
11-29-2011, 08:31 PM
I always deseed my hotter peppers (Serrano, Thai, Jalapeno, Habanero) and let them soak in water for at least a couple hours before stuffing or cooking. Makes a huge difference. Gets the burnya oils out of them.

normstar
11-29-2011, 08:35 PM
Are you blanching the Jalapeņos first?

kihrer
11-29-2011, 08:35 PM
Gets the burnya oils out of them.

Takes all the fun out of it the next morning:becky: I love hot peppers but my wife hates them. When I make Chili, I make two batches.

---k---
11-29-2011, 08:36 PM
I have cleaned and soaked jalapenos in Sprite for around 4 hours (if I recall correctly) and they came out with very little to mild heat. I'm pretty sure this works. I saw it once and did a search and lots of results came back with suggestions about soaking.

We can get Poblanos peppers in Mejier here. If they got them, any decent grocery store should.

---k---
11-29-2011, 08:37 PM
wow. lots of responses all at once. :shock:

kpdiver
11-29-2011, 10:03 PM
I'm absorbing all the advice. I will be trying the 7up method as well with the jalapenos. Looking forward to next growing season to try some of the other peppers mentioned.

Pyle's BBQ
11-29-2011, 10:14 PM
I'm with everyone that says to cut them in half. I did it for Thanksgiving Day and they turned out with very little heat. I usually do cut the top off and core them that way. I like the little "surprise" that may be left. Cutting them in half let you see what you have left in the pepper.

kpdiver
11-29-2011, 10:18 PM
I agree that you can get more of the rib out by cutting in half. Do you guys have a problem with the filling boiling out and dripping all over the place?



KP

Pyle's BBQ
11-29-2011, 10:23 PM
I didn't when I did mine. I did make sure I cut off the bare minimum from the top and that made a stop for the cream cheese. I did make the cream cheese fairly stiff also.

buccaneer
11-29-2011, 11:00 PM
Another thing to think about...The Fabulous One couldn't eat any hot spice when we met but I cut my teeth in Asia. The attitude is, dish it. You will develop a tolerance and a liking pretty quickly if you don't go all wimpy and let people chicken out!:tsk:
The Fabulous One LOVES hot spicy food now, it didn't take long to get her there.
I remember the rush of embarrassment when I ate some scorching Thai and wailed and fanned my mouth and my host looked at me like "Oh seriously, grow a couple" and pointed to his 3 year old chowing in hard with relish.:icon_blush:
Two weeks later I was really enjoying the heat!:-D:idea:

martyleach
11-29-2011, 11:10 PM
Another thing to think about...The Fabulous One couldn't eat any hot spice when we met but I cut my teeth in Asia. The attitude is, dish it. You will develop a tolerance and a liking pretty quickly if you don't go all wimpy and let people chicken out!:tsk:
The Fabulous One LOVES hot spicy food now, it didn't take long to get her there.
I remember the rush of embarrassment when I ate some scorching Thai and wailed and fanned my mouth and my host looked at me like "Oh seriously, grow a couple" and pointed to his 3 year old chowing in hard with relish.:icon_blush:
Two weeks later I was really enjoying the heat!:-D:idea:

Not to move this thread sideways but I cook for my family who doesn't really like hot stuff, so I have needed to compromise. I love hot food but when I cook it there are a lot of leftovers. So, I have learned how to de-heat the food without losing the flavor. Everyone is happy, sorta....

Midnight Smoke
11-29-2011, 11:55 PM
A little Brown Sugar mixed into the Cheese filling will cut the heat down.

buccaneer
11-29-2011, 11:59 PM
Not to move this thread sideways but I cook for my family who doesn't really like hot stuff, so I have needed to compromise. I love hot food but when I cook it there are a lot of leftovers. So, I have learned how to de-heat the food without losing the flavor. Everyone is happy, sorta....
Time Out<Marty, my lady cracked me up when she said"You know, I had no idea you were really being kind and thoughtful those few weeks you tortured me" while reminiscing and eating firey Thai food recently.>:laugh:
Time In.

DaveMW
11-30-2011, 05:12 AM
I agree that you can get more of the rib out by cutting in half. Do you guys have a problem with the filling boiling out and dripping all over the place?



KP

I cut mine in half and have no problem with filling coming out; that bacon keeps in snug inside the japapeno.

buccaneer
11-30-2011, 06:00 AM
:rolleyes:S'cuzi

captndan
12-01-2011, 05:23 AM
Yes the Sprite trick works very well. I soak them overnight.