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AD18
11-29-2011, 12:10 PM
Have been wanting a cast iron Dutch oven for a long time. Have been looking and was wondering what you people prefer. The old fashion straight up cast iron or the fancier enamel covered ones? The Le Creuset ones seem to be very popular but are pretty expensive. Lastly, do you use them on your cookers/smokers for anything in particular? Thanks a bunch.

OutlawSwine
11-29-2011, 12:17 PM
I personally like the old cast iron type. I'm using one that was handed down to me from my grandfather. I wouldn't trade it for anything.

BBQ Bacon
11-29-2011, 12:19 PM
I have a ceramic covered one and I've only used it in the oven for bread so far. I'm thinking of picking up a cast iron one for the grill/bbq.

nmayeux
11-29-2011, 12:28 PM
If you are looking to just use the oven in your kitchen, then either will work. However, if you want to use your oven inside and outside, then stick with the traditional stuff. The cool thing about the regular cast iron is that you can reseason at any time. If you chip the enamel, I wouldn't know where to start as to a repair.

Rick T
11-29-2011, 12:28 PM
I have a ceramic covered one and I've only used it in the oven for bread so far. I'm thinking of picking up a cast iron one for the grill/bbq.

For Bread; What kind? top on or off? Please post pron and explain.
Thanks
Rick

TIMMAY
11-29-2011, 12:33 PM
If you are looking to just use the oven in your kitchen, then either will work. However, if you want to use your oven inside and outside, then stick with the traditional stuff. The cool thing about the regular cast iron is that you can reseason at any time. If you chip the enamel, I wouldn't know where to start as to a repair.

Very good point. My wife would kill me if I took her Le Crueset stuff outside and put it over coals.

landarc
11-29-2011, 12:40 PM
The coals will stain the Le Creuset, it works fine though. I use both, they are different tools for sure. I like the enameled one for fine cooking, and it looks great serving on a set table. The black iron is my go to for most cooking, especially outside.

I prefer the black iron for bread as well, I think it is actually less inclined to stick and the shape works great.

GARNAAL
11-29-2011, 01:32 PM
Amazon.com: Lodge Logic 8-Quart Pre-Seasoned Cast-Iron Camp Dutch Oven: Kitchen & Dining@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41MBU00s0%2BL.@@AMEPARAM@@41MBU00s0%2BL (http://www.amazon.com/Lodge-Logic-8-Quart-Pre-Seasoned-Cast-Iron/dp/B00008GKDW/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1322594903&sr=8-3)

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41MBU00s0%2BL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

I have this one and love it - use it on the BBQ all the time -

bake bread in it,
https://public.bay.livefilestore.com/y1p2in2lNDDJgJ3G_iTwGuRsrd9kzWuaoigFG1RBh0r9g_UcRe P1EV7_Z4AHl2K7M9Vek3JtfN-E2vlg2myMDxlqw/HPIM3901r.JPG?psid=1
beans,
stews,
curries
you name it..:becky:

BBQ_MAFIA
11-29-2011, 01:47 PM
I never put my Le Creuset in the smoker the regular cast iron goes in my cookers all the time.

kyle corn
11-29-2011, 01:53 PM
efore anyone jumps in on some rant about Le Creuset being overly priced, I'd like to say that they are worth every penny IF you have a need for an enameled oven. The cheap enameled dutch ovens will be chipped to hell within months if you use them regularly. Plus, there are those that are concerned with the lead levels in the enamel used by the Chinese made dutch ovens. FYI, any low cost dutch oven you get at a big box store, or is endorsed by a celebrity chef or even the enameled Lodge products are all Chinese made and I really recommend you avoid them. If you like the enameled cast iron stuff then stick with Le Creuset or Staub. The only cheap enameled cast iron that I would recommend is the 6.5 qt french oven sold at Costco under the Kirkland brand. It is very well made and made in France. The downside to it is the cast iron is thinner than you'd get from a more expensive brand, but you save some cash and still get a good product.

Enameled vs bare cast iron: it took me a long time to see the benefits of enameled cast iron, but I love my enameled dutch oven. My bare Lodge dutch oven gets used a ton (just last week I made a vegetable stew over coals on my BGE) but the enameled stuff is a lifesaver.

That being said, a cast iron dutch oven should already be in your kitchen. I recommend you pick up a bare Lodge dutch oven and see what you’re missing out on. If you use it often enough you’ll probably start lusting after a Le Creuset, but you can deal with that later after you’ve caught the fever

BBQ Bacon
11-29-2011, 01:58 PM
For Bread; What kind? top on or off? Please post pron and explain.
Thanks
Rick

I use the Miracle Boule recipe from Laura Calder on Food Network Canada.
http://www.foodnetwork.ca/recipes/miracle-boule/recipe.html?dishID=9041

I've done it a couple times and it's been great. Sorry I don't recall taking pictures of it, but I may just make it this weekend.

El Pistolero
11-29-2011, 02:50 PM
The Le Creuset ones seem to be very popular but are pretty expensive.

Just a heads up, Le Creuset has outlet stores in most every major city now...I picked up a 9 qt. model the other day for $190...it's normally over $500.

For cooking outdoors tho, traditional cast iron is the way to go.

caseydog
11-29-2011, 02:55 PM
I have three different sizes of LeCreuset Dutch ovens -- or as they call them, French ovens. Whatever.

I love them. I using the big one right now to cook up some gumbo. There are several brands of LeCreuset-style enameled cast iron now. Even Lodge now has a line of them.

I'm luck in having a LeCreuset outlet near me, so I can get deals on factory seconds.

CD

kyle corn
11-29-2011, 03:02 PM
I use the Miracle Boule recipe from Laura Calder on Food Network Canada.
http://www.foodnetwork.ca/recipes/miracle-boule/recipe.html?dishID=9041

I've done it a couple times and it's been great. Sorry I don't recall taking pictures of it, but I may just make it this weekend.

That's the No Knead Bread recipe that was published in the NY Times a few years back. Very simple, very delicious bread that a 5 year old can make. Well worth giving it a shot. Google "no knead bread" and you'll also find tons of improvements and variations on the origial recipe.

kyle corn
11-29-2011, 03:07 PM
I love them. I using the big one right now to cook up some gumbo. There are several brands of LeCreuset-style enameled cast iron now. Even Lodge now has a line of them.


I just wanted to point out that even though Lodgeís bare cast iron is made in the USA, their enameled cast iron is made in China. The quality is no better than any other cheap enameled cast iron that you get at any big box store, but it costs almost twice as much. If anyone is considering a cheap enameled dutch oven I strongly recommend the French oven sold at Costco under the Kirkland brand (made in France) or if thatís too much just pick up the cheapest enameled dutch oven you can find. Just donít buy the Lodge enameled cast iron and expect it to be good quality.

Kirkland french oven
http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11631290&search=french%20oven&topnav=&Mo=0&cm_re=1_en-_-Top_Left_Nav-_-Top_search&lang=en-US&Nr=P_CatalogName:BC&N=5000043&whse=BC&Dx=mode%20matchallpartial&Ntk=Text_Search&Dr=P_CatalogName:BC&Ne=4000000&D=french%20oven&Ntt=french%20oven&No=0&Nty=1&Ntx=mode%20matchallpartial

AD18
11-29-2011, 03:10 PM
So if I want to put the oven in/on my BGE or Weber kettle OR kitchen stove top I should steer towards the Lodge? If I just want to use on kitchen stove the LeCrueset is pertier? I was concerned about the outside enamel getting all messed up with smoke etc. on either of the Q's with the LCr.

tish
11-29-2011, 03:12 PM
For Bread; What kind? top on or off? Please post pron and explain.
Thanks
Rick


I use my ancient Griswold dutch oven in which to make bread. The recipe I use most frequently is a "white-wheat". When it comes out of the dutch oven (with a closed lid) it actually "sings' with crackling sounds. It has a beautiful crust outside, and a light but chewy texture inside. I only use fresh churned butter on it, and it tastes outstanding! I haven't baked bread in my grill or smoker yet, but when I do, it will be in my dutch oven. I won't make bread any other way anymore. :wink:


http://i1217.photobucket.com/albums/dd392/lizzietish726/banginbread.jpg

Rubmybutt
11-29-2011, 03:25 PM
I use my ancient Griswold dutch oven in which to make bread. The recipe I use most frequently is a "white-wheat". When it comes out of the dutch oven (with a closed lid) it actually "sings' with crackling sounds. It has a beautiful crust outside, and a light but chewy texture inside. I only use fresh churned butter on it, and it tastes outstanding! I haven't baked bread in my grill or smoker yet, but when I do, it will be in my dutch oven. I won't make bread any other way anymore. :wink:


http://i1217.photobucket.com/albums/dd392/lizzietish726/banginbread.jpg

TISH that looks marvilous!!!!! Would you share the recipt? Thank you for posting that pron!!!!

I'm going with the flow, I owned a LeCreuset 7qt for years and it has served me very well! I use it on the stove and in the oven, even the inside is starting to darken but no chips! If I go to the grill smoker outdoors I'm going with the Lodge brothers! :thumb:

nmayeux
11-29-2011, 03:37 PM
My affinity towards regular cast iron is probably a result of an unnatural fetish...

tish
11-29-2011, 04:04 PM
http://i1217.photobucket.com/albums/dd392/lizzietish726/no-knead-bread-revisited.jpg

Wish I could take credit for the pron, but it's not mine. I don't have a camera. It's on my wish list, but until I get one, I'll have to be satisfied with photos from the sites where I get my recipes. *sigh* Anyway, these photos look exactly like my bread because it's the exact same recipe, done the same way, with the same equipment. Just thought it's the same as telling a lie not to let you know that. :tsk:

No-Knead Bread Recipe

Servings: One 1-pound loaf

This recipe for No-Knead Bread is adapted from Mark Bittman of the NY Times who got it from the Sullivan Street Bakery. The adaptation is from Rose Levy Beranbaum, author of the Bread Bible.

ngredients:

1-1/2 cups bread flour
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1/4 teaspoon instant yeast
3/4 tablespoon of kosher salt
1 1/2 cups warm water

Covered, five-quart or larger cast iron dutch oven

Directions:

1. Mix dough: The night before, combine all ingredients in a big bowl with a wooden spoon until the dough just comes together. It will be a shaggy, doughy mess. Cover with plastic wrap and let sit 12-20 hours on countertop.

2. Shape & preheat: The dough will now be wet, sticky and bubbly. With a wet spatula, dump the dough on a floured surface. Fold ends of dough over a few times with the spatula and nudge it into a ball shape. You can use your hands if you like, just keep your hands wet so that the dough does not stick. Generously dust a cotton towel (not terrycloth) with flour. Set dough seam side down on top of towel. Fold towel over the dough. Let it nap for 2 hours. When you've got about a half hour left, slip your covered dutch oven into the oven and preheat to 450F.

3. Bake: Your dough should have doubled in size. Remove dutch oven from oven. Holding towel, turn over and dump wobbly dough into dutch oven, using your hands to get the dough off the towel. Doesn't matter which way it lands. In fact, the messier it lands, the more "rustic" it looks. Shake to even dough out. Cover. Bake 30 minutes. Uncover, bake another 15-20 minutes or until the crust is beautifully golden and middle of loaf is 210F. Remove and let cool on wired rack. If not eating right away, you can re-crisp crust in 350F oven for 10 minutes. Best way to eat it? Smear a warm slice with some good butter. I use fresh-churned from my local dairy.

So, if you decide to make it, do let me know how it turns out. Enjoy! :whoo:

buccaneer
11-29-2011, 04:04 PM
My take: I would choose Staub over others for inside, but close is le Crueset
I would use cast iron outside(BBQ) with one exception to both.
Emile Henry ceramic pots.
I use for all my bread on the BBQ, beans and sometimes meat dishes like stews, cassoulets and casseroles.
If I am browning or frying cast iron wins.
HTH

Tish, that bread is glorious girl!:clap2:

caseydog
11-29-2011, 04:49 PM
I just wanted to point out that even though Lodgeís bare cast iron is made in the USA, their enameled cast iron is made in China. The quality is no better than any other cheap enameled cast iron that you get at any big box store, but it costs almost twice as much. If anyone is considering a cheap enameled dutch oven I strongly recommend the French oven sold at Costco under the Kirkland brand (made in France) or if thatís too much just pick up the cheapest enameled dutch oven you can find. Just donít buy the Lodge enameled cast iron and expect it to be good quality.

Kirkland french oven
http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11631290&search=french%20oven&topnav=&Mo=0&cm_re=1_en-_-Top_Left_Nav-_-Top_search&lang=en-US&Nr=P_CatalogName:BC&N=5000043&whse=BC&Dx=mode%20matchallpartial&Ntk=Text_Search&Dr=P_CatalogName:BC&Ne=4000000&D=french%20oven&Ntt=french%20oven&No=0&Nty=1&Ntx=mode%20matchallpartial

I wouldn't have guessed Lodge would go to China for their enameled iron. Too bad. I've seen the Kirkland stuff at Costco, but I never stopped to look at it.

CD

kyle corn
11-29-2011, 05:12 PM
I wouldn't have guessed Lodge would go to China for their enameled iron. Too bad. I've seen the Kirkland stuff at Costco, but I never stopped to look at it.

CD

Yeah, I was really considering a Lodge enamaled oven and was very disappointed to find that they farm the manufacturing out to China. The Costco oven is very nice, I got one for my dad on his birthday and he loves it. It is thinner than other pots, but it's still excellent for the price and and it's not so thin it's flimsy, but if you're used to really heavy Lodge ovens then you'll notice the difference.

buccaneer
11-29-2011, 05:14 PM
If it is true about the lead enamel, why isn't everyone freaking out about Weber?
They are manufactured in China too?:confused:
Aren't they?

nmayeux
11-29-2011, 05:19 PM
If it is true about the lead enamel, why isn't everyone freaking out about Weber?
They are manufactured in China too?:confused:
Aren't they?
Nope. Grills made here in the states. Packaging, and some small components made overseas.

landarc
11-29-2011, 05:40 PM
Plus, unless something has gone terribly wrong, I am not eating food that was in constant, or even temporary, contact with my kettles surface.

buccaneer
11-29-2011, 05:57 PM
Plus, unless something has gone terribly wrong, I am not eating food that was in constant, or even temporary, contact with my kettles surface.
Gravity.

Hoss
11-29-2011, 06:15 PM
I have both and use both on my BGE very often.

buccaneer
11-29-2011, 07:13 PM
Not official but on a thread somewhere I just read a page of conversation saying weber spirit manufactured in China 2007 on, but 2010 almost ALL weber manufactured in China with many assembled only in USA/Mexico?

caseydog
11-29-2011, 07:19 PM
Not official but on a thread somewhere I just read a page of conversation saying weber spirit manufactured in China 2007 on, but 2010 almost ALL weber manufactured in China with many assembled only in USA/Mexico?

All Weber charcoal grills a are still made in the USA, and the Genesis gassers are made in the USA with a mixture of American and imported parts.

CD

caliking
11-29-2011, 07:42 PM
If you need an enameled DO and have money to burn, then the Le Creuset or Staub are great. But if you don't have the cashola to burn, buy the Tramontina enameled DO - a Cook's Illustrated best buy, and you or your food won't know the difference. The finish on mine has held up well over 4-5 years of moderate use.

morgaj1
11-29-2011, 08:14 PM
Not official but on a thread somewhere I just read a page of conversation saying weber spirit manufactured in China 2007 on, but 2010 almost ALL weber manufactured in China with many assembled only in USA/Mexico?

I just bought a new Weber Performer with a 2010 date code. Made in USA was stamped all over the box.

Pyle's BBQ
11-29-2011, 09:51 PM
If you have a TJ Maxx or Marshall's near you check out their cooking section. They usually have LeCreuset seconds. They are still pricey but it is not full price.

Smiter Q
11-29-2011, 11:05 PM
LODGE Enamelware...
Consumer Reports ranked high as the Frenchie stuff...

Amazon.com: lodge enameled cast iron: Home & Kitchen (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_12?url=search-alias%3Dgarden&field-keywords=lodge+enameled+cast+iron&sprefix=lodge+enamel)

kyle corn
11-29-2011, 11:29 PM
LODGE Enamelware...
Consumer Reports ranked high as the Frenchie stuff...

Amazon.com: lodge enameled cast iron: Home & Kitchen (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_12?url=search-alias%3Dgarden&field-keywords=lodge+enameled+cast+iron&sprefix=lodge+enamel)

When brand new you won't see a difference in performance between Le Creuset, Staub, Lodge Enamelware or generic enameled cast iron. But in a few years the Lodge or generic stuff will be chipped to hell while the Le Creuset or Staub will be an heirloom piece. I had a Lodge that was chipped and gouged in 8 months before it got put away in the garage. The last cheap one I bought lasted about 6 months before it was chipping. The LC pot I have has been going strong for well over a year. I don't abuse my stuff and I know how to properly care for it. Of course, the enameled cast iron dutch oven is the most used piece of cookware in my kitchen so perhaps I put it to use more than others will.

You don't have to buy a Le Creuset or Staub for it to work well, just understand when you buy a 6 quart enameled dutch oven for $50 and if you plan to put it through its paces then you're buying a disposable pot. If you're only going to put it to occasional use to simmer beans once a month then buy cheap and don't look back, you'll never know the difference.

Trust me, I used to be there and think that Le Creuset was nothing more than overpriced crap sold at Williams Sonoma for housewives trying to one up eachother. If you're going to use it, it's worth the purchase price.

ALLENY
11-30-2011, 12:11 AM
Can anyone confirm where the weber grills are made? If they are made in china i will get rid of mine asap!

Flask
11-30-2011, 12:13 AM
The LC is a quality product. I get a little grin on my face everytime I can think of a way to put to use. Which seems to be more and more of late. I need to go look at those outlet stores for deals.

Plus you can throw it in the dishwasher after cooking.

Pyle's BBQ
11-30-2011, 02:16 AM
Here is your answer.

Pyle's BBQ
11-30-2011, 02:17 AM
All Weber charcoal grills a are still made in the USA, and the Genesis gassers are made in the USA with a mixture of American and imported parts.

CD

Can anyone confirm where the weber grills are made? If they are made in china i will get rid of mine asap!

See above entry.

buccaneer
11-30-2011, 02:26 AM
CD may not be right on this.
Weber page says the spirit series have been made in China since 2007, haven't researched further yet.

buccaneer
11-30-2011, 02:28 AM
Can anyone confirm where the weber grills are made? If they are made in china i will get rid of mine asap!
Send a quick email to weber USA, they have to tell you, then you will know for sure.
Weber in Aus is not Weber at all, owned by a different crowd.

AD18
11-30-2011, 07:09 AM
Has my Dutch/French oven post been hijacked by a US/Chinese Weber? :-D
Hehehehehehe.

Bigdog
11-30-2011, 07:10 AM
I have the enameled for inside cooking and the plain for outside. Buy what you can afford and yes, the expensive stuff is worth it IMHO. :thumb:

cdkeach
11-30-2011, 08:22 AM
For what it's worth, according to the Journal of Commerce PIERS (Import/Export reporting), Weber imported over 1000 40' containers from China in the last year. As declared to US Customs over half of these were gas or "bbq" grills.

I couldn't tell you what models specifically but there are certainly a lot of Webers made in China. Same is true with Charbroil, Chargriller and Brinkmann.

deltablues69
11-30-2011, 09:21 AM
Have been wanting a cast iron Dutch oven for a long time. Have been looking and was wondering what you people prefer. The old fashion straight up cast iron or the fancier enamel covered ones? The Le Creuset ones seem to be very popular but are pretty expensive. Lastly, do you use them on your cookers/smokers for anything in particular? Thanks a bunch.I have a like new Le Creuset that I bought on ebay for a lot less than a new one would have cost. I intentionally bought a black one so I wouldn't have to be concerned about smoke stains and discoloring. I use it both indoors and outdoors on the egg and it has worked out great!

BBQ Bacon
11-30-2011, 09:28 AM
http://i1217.photobucket.com/albums/dd392/lizzietish726/no-knead-bread-revisited.jpg

Wish I could take credit for the pron, but it's not mine. I don't have a camera. It's on my wish list, but until I get one, I'll have to be satisfied with photos from the sites where I get my recipes. *sigh* Anyway, these photos look exactly like my bread because it's the exact same recipe, done the same way, with the same equipment. Just thought it's the same as telling a lie not to let you know that. :tsk:

No-Knead Bread Recipe

Servings: One 1-pound loaf

This recipe for No-Knead Bread is adapted from Mark Bittman of the NY Times who got it from the Sullivan Street Bakery. The adaptation is from Rose Levy Beranbaum, author of the Bread Bible.

ngredients:

1-1/2 cups bread flour
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1/4 teaspoon instant yeast
3/4 tablespoon of kosher salt
1 1/2 cups warm water

Covered, five-quart or larger cast iron dutch oven

Directions:

1. Mix dough: The night before, combine all ingredients in a big bowl with a wooden spoon until the dough just comes together. It will be a shaggy, doughy mess. Cover with plastic wrap and let sit 12-20 hours on countertop.

2. Shape & preheat: The dough will now be wet, sticky and bubbly. With a wet spatula, dump the dough on a floured surface. Fold ends of dough over a few times with the spatula and nudge it into a ball shape. You can use your hands if you like, just keep your hands wet so that the dough does not stick. Generously dust a cotton towel (not terrycloth) with flour. Set dough seam side down on top of towel. Fold towel over the dough. Let it nap for 2 hours. When you've got about a half hour left, slip your covered dutch oven into the oven and preheat to 450F.

3. Bake: Your dough should have doubled in size. Remove dutch oven from oven. Holding towel, turn over and dump wobbly dough into dutch oven, using your hands to get the dough off the towel. Doesn't matter which way it lands. In fact, the messier it lands, the more "rustic" it looks. Shake to even dough out. Cover. Bake 30 minutes. Uncover, bake another 15-20 minutes or until the crust is beautifully golden and middle of loaf is 210F. Remove and let cool on wired rack. If not eating right away, you can re-crisp crust in 350F oven for 10 minutes. Best way to eat it? Smear a warm slice with some good butter. I use fresh-churned from my local dairy.

So, if you decide to make it, do let me know how it turns out. Enjoy! :whoo:

The only adaptation I did to this was use parchment paper instead of a cotton towel. Then I just dropped the parchment paper with the dough straight into the Dutch oven and popped it in the stove. I just quickly trimmed off excess parchment paper. That way I didn't have to worry about cleaning up a cotton towel afterwards. I'm lazy that way!

tish
11-30-2011, 10:16 AM
Do let me know how it comes out, BBQ Bacon! :wink:

Bourbon Barrel BBQ
11-30-2011, 02:35 PM
I've got a big 12 inch LC frying pan and a 6.5 Qt. Staub French oven. They are both awesome to cook with.

Myrdhyn
11-30-2011, 03:27 PM
I have a non-enameled lodge dutch oven that is probably my very favorite cooking vessel. Non-enameled is a bit fussier to take care of, but not very much so, and I don't hesitate to put it on the stove (gas or ceramic topped), in the oven, on my gasser, on my kettle grill, or in my WSM. It's a tank as long as you remember to wipe it out and give it a few swipes with a few drops of fresh oil/fat after you use it.

That said, I do plan on picking up an enameled lodge dutch oven for when I cook acidic foods for long periods of time (read: spaghetti sauce, adobo, or chili in the dutch oven in the oven) or when I take something IN the dutch oven somewhere besides home (so I don't have to clean immediately after eating/cooking).

Hankdad1
11-30-2011, 06:49 PM
I've been looking to buy a cast iron dutch oven, any opinions on what is a good size?

tish
11-30-2011, 06:56 PM
I've been looking to buy a cast iron dutch oven, any opinions on what is a good size?

I like my 5-quart CIDO. Big enough to make my bread, or stew for the whole family, but not so big that I feel like it's overkill. :roll:

Big Bears BBQ
11-30-2011, 07:24 PM
Tish, the bread really looks good.........

tish
11-30-2011, 07:29 PM
Thank you, Big Bears! I tastes really good, too. And it's chit easy to make. I almost feel like I'm cheating when I make it. :rolleyes:

tish
11-30-2011, 07:31 PM
IT!! IT tastes really good... not I!! lol Well, I tastes really good, too, but you'll have to take Harvard's word for that. OMG... I'll just take this opportunity to shut up now. :tape:

Kathy's Smokin'
11-30-2011, 07:48 PM
After reading this thread I decided to take a look at some of our Dutch and French cast iron. I had no idea so much of what we have is from China -- mind you, the two "La Compagnie" large French ovens we bought brand new, about 5 years ago now, are sadly from China too, I wasn't as fussy about where stuff was coming from then as I am now. I was glad to see many of my frying pans are old Wagner Ware made in the US. They were gifts decades ago when I was newly in my first apartments and learning to cook. The massive deep CI frying pan with lid we got at a thrift store for $4 last year was made in China. Sad. It's monster thick, big and heavy, though, so maybe not so cheap. A few years ago we picked up several vintage LC pieces in fire orange, well used but still in good shape, for just a few dollars a piece so there's always that option for those Brethren, like us, who are on a tight budget. I'm inspired to use what we have more since I've been reading this thread, thank you all for your input.

Big Bears BBQ
11-30-2011, 08:49 PM
Tish thanks for posting this I'm going to try it next week I just keep thinking warm bread with butter soaking in, the crust is my best part....

tish
11-30-2011, 10:00 PM
Big Bears, there's nothing better than smelling this baking. When it comes out of the oven and you put it on a rack to cool, you can hear it crackling. We say it's singing. lol The taste with some good, fresh butter is so satisfying. Please let me know how it turns out. :wink:

ALLENY
12-01-2011, 12:06 AM
i have a non-enameled lodge dutch oven that is probably my very favorite cooking vessel. Non-enameled is a bit fussier to take care of, but not very much so, and i don't hesitate to put it on the stove (gas or ceramic topped), in the oven, on my gasser, on my kettle grill, or in my wsm. It's a tank as long as you remember to wipe it out and give it a few swipes with a few drops of fresh oil/fat after you use it.

That said, i do plan on picking up an enameled lodge dutch oven for when i cook acidic foods for long periods of time (read: Spaghetti sauce, adobo, or chili in the dutch oven in the oven) or when i take something in the dutch oven somewhere besides home (so i don't have to clean immediately after eating/cooking).

how do you take care of a non enameled dutch oven?

Myrdhyn
12-01-2011, 09:53 AM
how do you take care of a non enameled dutch oven?

As soon as we're done cooking and serving, any leftovers get moved to another container for storage/getting seconds. I rinse it out with hot water, and use a stiff PLASTIC brush to get anything off of it that might be stuck on. Then dry it completely, drop about a teaspoon or less of veg oil in it and the lid (pay particular attention to the underside of the lid), and then use paper towels to completely cover it in said oil, when you're done it should look dry and slighly shiney, it should NOT look like it's got a coating of oil on it. Then put it away in the cabinet with the lid offset (don't store cast iron with lids on or they can rust inside).

If it needs more than just hot water and a plastic brush, I scrub it with kosher salt and a paper towel, alton brown style. Then complete the process as normal. If it needs anything more than that (say I need to use soap/detergent), I immediately re-season after washing.

Rover24
12-01-2011, 11:19 AM
As soon as we're done cooking and serving, any leftovers get moved to another container for storage/getting seconds. I rinse it out with hot water, and use a stiff PLASTIC brush to get anything off of it that might be stuck on. Then dry it completely, drop about a teaspoon or less of veg oil in it and the lid (pay particular attention to the underside of the lid), and then use paper towels to completely cover it in said oil, when you're done it should look dry and slighly shiney, it should NOT look like it's got a coating of oil on it. Then put it away in the cabinet with the lid offset (don't store cast iron with lids on or they can rust inside).

If it needs more than just hot water and a plastic brush, I scrub it with kosher salt and a paper towel, alton brown style. Then complete the process as normal. If it needs anything more than that (say I need to use soap/detergent), I immediately re-season after washing.


I do exactly as above for all of my iron skillets, Myrdhyn gives some great advise. The only deviance I have from his process is that I never use soap on my pans. Soap destroys the pan's seasoning. If I have some particularly baked on crud, I fill the skillet half full of water and bring it to a boil on the stove top. That has always done the job to loosen up the crud so that the plastic brush (I use my daughters old bottle brushes) gets the skillet clean.

tish
12-01-2011, 11:31 AM
I do exactly as above for all of my iron skillets, Myrdhyn gives some great advise. The only deviance I have from his process is that I never use soap on my pans. Soap destroys the pan's seasoning. If I have some particularly baked on crud, I fill the skillet half full of water and bring it to a boil on the stove top. That has always done the job to loosen up the crud so that the plastic brush (I use my daughters old bottle brushes) gets the skillet clean.

I do the same. Has always worked for me.

Myrdhyn
12-01-2011, 01:22 PM
Just to clarify, I've only ever had to use soap in extreme circumstances brought about by my own absent mindedness (we're talking seriously baked on crud). What you're saying about it destroying the seasoning is true though, that's why I say to immediately re-season the pan afterwards. I wish I had thought of the boiling water thing, that should work perfectly. I'll be doing that in the future.

Cloudsmoker
12-01-2011, 08:26 PM
Agree withi all the above. Just want to add that I've gotten unusually lucky shopping for La Creuset on eBay. Just sayin.

Kathy's Smokin'
12-01-2011, 08:38 PM
For some of the really hard crud, often bacon because I like it super crispy, I let the pan sit with cold water in it while I'm doing the other dishes, etc.. The plastic brush I use for my CI is rectangular and has a hard plastic scraper side if you flip it over. I've never had crud that didn't come off with a short soak and that scraper --- except back in the old days when I didn't cook with enough oil. I continually made a mess of the seasoning and couldn't figure out why because I didn't use soap or hot water. Got that figured out, started cooking with enough oil and I've not had a problem since.