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View Full Version : Need A Reccomendation For A Spice Grinder.


Q-Dat
11-26-2011, 09:46 AM
Currently I am using a cheapo Hamilton Beach from Wally World, and don't care for it. It tends to make things too powdery when I'm looking for granular. Also it completely misses whole pieces sometimes. I think the problem is that it just operates with a spinning blade like a tiny food processor. It isn't really a grinder.

Is there an electric grinder that actually grinds like a pepper mill?

smokeyw
11-26-2011, 09:52 AM
I have always just used a small coffee grinder for spices. I have one that is only used for that. If I want the spices coarse, I just pulse the grinder a few times. If I want them fine, I grind a little longer.

El Ropo
11-26-2011, 09:54 AM
I have a second burr coffee grinder that I use exclusively for grinding spices. I use the coarsest grind setting and run the spices through several times for a consistent size. The end result is not quite powdery, but not quite coarse, somewhere in between.

LuvDbbq
11-26-2011, 10:03 AM
Coffee grinder works. I like to pulse then tap the sides then pulse.

JMSetzler
11-26-2011, 10:29 AM
Mortar and pestle.

Wampus
11-26-2011, 10:36 AM
Mortar and pestle.

That's what I use as well!:thumb:

We do have a mini food processor that I'll use sometimes for herb paste, light spice processing, etc. But usually I just use the M&P or the cutting board and chef's knife for fresh herbs.

Q-Dat
11-26-2011, 10:48 AM
I have a second burr coffee grinder that I use exclusively for grinding spices. I use the coarsest grind setting and run the spices through several times for a consistent size. The end result is not quite powdery, but not quite coarse, somewhere in between.

OK I just googled Burr Grinder and that looks like what I need! Thanks!

Q-Dat
11-26-2011, 10:49 AM
Mortar and pestle.

Yeah I have a set, I'm just too lazy to use it sometimes.

smokeyw
11-26-2011, 11:06 AM
I also have a mortar and pestle but find that the coffee grinder does just as good job (depending on the spices) and is quicker.

buccaneer
11-26-2011, 03:33 PM
I also have a mortar and pestle but find that the coffee grinder does just as good job (depending on the spices) and is quicker.
My experience is the opposite.
M&P is my first choice because the result leaves far more oils in the product and that makes a distinct difference. I think it is the heat generated by he blade speed.
I also have a mini coffee blender and have a burr grinder.
Burr grinder is my second choice, and it depends what I am doing really.

smokeyw
11-26-2011, 04:45 PM
I can go along with that. I have 2 different size M&Ps and still use them depending on what I am doing :thumb:

My experience is the opposite.
M&P is my first choice because the result leaves far more oils in the product and that makes a distinct difference. I think it is the heat generated by he blade speed.
I also have a mini coffee blender and have a burr grinder.
Burr grinder is my second choice, and it depends what I am doing really.

JMSetzler
11-26-2011, 04:47 PM
The mortar and pestle makes it easier to grind your spices to a desired consistency. It is, however, more difficult to deal with some things like whole peppercorns that don't grind as easily.

smokeyw
11-26-2011, 05:05 PM
I am a huge fan of fresh ground black pepper and probably use the coffee grinder to grind pepercorns more than anything.

The mortar and pestle makes it easier to grind your spices to a desired consistency. It is, however, more difficult to deal with some things like whole peppercorns that don't grind as easily.

buccaneer
11-26-2011, 06:19 PM
Lining up nicely here, I use the M&P for rough large grinds and use the coffee mill for fine stuff with peppercorns.

El Ropo
11-26-2011, 06:37 PM
All I know is making custom rubs in the coffee grinder works great!

SmokinAussie
11-26-2011, 09:53 PM
^^^^ Which is why I'm taking my new burr grinder out of the box right now. I've got a really expensive one for coffee... but that's just for coffee. I've been using a M+P for years, but I'll be making rubs in larger volume now from unground spices like cinnamon and nutmeg, and whole dried chilis (for example)...

Check this link. (http://www.krups.com/All+Products/coffee-grinders/Products/GVX2/GVX2.htm)

http://www.krups.com/NR/rdonlyres/25B32B40-79CE-41C7-9E3F-2D08FE95A409/0/gvx2_main.jpg

Cheers!

Bill

buccaneer
11-26-2011, 09:57 PM
Bucc gives a low whistle

Q-Dat
11-26-2011, 10:09 PM
^^^^ Which is why I'm taking my new burr grinder out of the box right now. I've got a really expensive one for coffee... but that's just for coffee. I've been using a M+P for years, but I'll be making rubs in larger volume now from unground spices like cinnamon and nutmeg, and whole dried chilis (for example)...

Check this link. (http://www.krups.com/All+Products/coffee-grinders/Products/GVX2/GVX2.htm)

http://www.krups.com/NR/rdonlyres/25B32B40-79CE-41C7-9E3F-2D08FE95A409/0/gvx2_main.jpg

Cheers!

Bill

Much thanks! I like that one.

landarc
11-27-2011, 12:56 AM
Try grinding cloves by hand in a small M&P, that is a pain.

smokestack
11-27-2011, 05:28 AM
I have killed a couple wally world coffee grinders so went to a local kitchen shop and they recomended the cuisinart spice and nutgrinder model sg -10 So far so good
Have ground spices to coarse all the way down to dust- seems to work fine so far and is around 40 bucks

El Ropo
11-27-2011, 07:37 AM
My experience is the opposite.
I think it is the heat generated by he blade speed.


That's why I never use a blade style coffee grinder for anything. High quality burr grinders have reduction gears to slow down the process, resulting in much lower heat. This is important when grinding coffee beans and spices as the oils aren't burnt or overheated. MMMMM fresh ground coffee!

I also roast my own beans!

Ron_L
11-27-2011, 09:02 AM
The biggest problem with a whirly-blade grinder is the inconsistency of the particle size. No matter what technique you use you'll end up with varying particle sizes and a bunch of dust. The second issue is reproducibility. It is impossible to achieve the same results twice. The third is the heat generated by the blades. If you look at the blade the edge is not sharp, and it causes friction when it pulverizes the spies (or coffee, for that matter. I do use one for spices once in a while when I'm in a hurry, but I don't let it run too long, and I shake it vigorously while grinding to try to get a more even grind.

My dissertation :) on coffee grinders (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=98321) applies here, too. A burr grinder will give you more even particle size and some degree of reproducibility, but not all burr grinders are created equal. The lower cost burr grinders use flat burrs and still produce a fair amount of heat due to friction and will produce more dust. Conical burrs grinder produce less heat and less dust.

SmokeOCD
11-27-2011, 09:08 AM
Try grinding cloves by hand in a small M&P, that is a pain.

Just did that for our pies over the holiday. Got about 75% and couldn't do any more - used a fine mesh strainer to separate. Best pie ever, but probably more due to the fresh pumpkins than the M&P cloves.

buccaneer
11-27-2011, 09:10 AM
That's what I suspected when I looked at the specs of the Krups pictured, Bill, that one doesn't say "conical" and it would if it was because that is a big plus.
Pretty for the bench but I'd get a Sunbeam Conical unless you are doing commercial volumes mate. Very good bang for your buck.
HTH

Capozzoli
11-27-2011, 09:16 AM
Mortar and pestle here too.

I use the electric coffee grinder also but like you said it makes it too powdery.

SmokinAussie
11-27-2011, 03:41 PM
That's what I suspected when I looked at the specs of the Krups pictured, Bill, that one doesn't say "conical" and it would if it was because that is a big plus.
Pretty for the bench but I'd get a Sunbeam Conical unless you are doing commercial volumes mate. Very good bang for your buck.
HTH

Yes, that one does not appear to be conical. I have taken it apart and found 2 circular discs. Not dissapointed though for the money. I ran some black peppercorns through it last night on a test run and the results were very pleasing. Very little dust, and quite a good consistency of grind.

Cheers!

Bill

buccaneer
11-27-2011, 05:30 PM
Fair enough!:-D

Soulman1282
11-27-2011, 05:38 PM
Mortar and pestle, all the way. Someone said it was a pain grinding cloves in a small M&P, solution: get a large one! I have one large, granite M&P and it is the best. Takes a little elbow grease but the results and flavor difference is well worth it. Plus its an excellent multi-tasker. grind spices, make marinades and vinaigrette, or just really bash up some garlic and herbs to get mega flavor into/onto foods! plus it only cost about 30-40 dollars and will last a lifetime. Loves my mortar and pestle!

NorthwestBBQ
11-27-2011, 05:45 PM
The biggest problem with a whirly-blade grinder is the inconsistency of the particle size. No matter what technique you use you'll end up with varying particle sizes and a bunch of dust. The second issue is reproducibility. It is impossible to achieve the same results twice. The third is the heat generated by the blades. If you look at the blade the edge is not sharp, and it causes friction when it pulverizes the spies (or coffee, for that matter. I do use one for spices once in a while when I'm in a hurry, but I don't let it run too long, and I shake it vigorously while grinding to try to get a more even grind.

My dissertation :) on coffee grinders (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=98321) applies here, too. A burr grinder will give you more even particle size and some degree of reproducibility, but not all burr grinders are created equal. The lower cost burr grinders use flat burrs and still produce a fair amount of heat due to friction and will produce more dust. Conical burrs grinder produce less heat and less dust.

So what is the best burr grinder that you like, Ron?

buccaneer
11-27-2011, 05:48 PM
So what is the best burr grinder that you like, Ron?
Jumping in but have a look at these
http://www.mahlkoenig.com/

NorthwestBBQ
11-27-2011, 05:55 PM
Jumping in but have a look at these
http://www.mahlkoenig.com/ (http://www.mahlkoenig.com/)

Nice.

http://www.mahlkoenig.com/images/172/300x500.jpg

Only $8,400. :-P

colonel00
11-27-2011, 06:54 PM
Nice.

http://www.mahlkoenig.com/images/172/300x500.jpg

Only $8,400. :-P

:shocked::tsk:

buccaneer
11-27-2011, 08:00 PM
I can't help it....I saw the words "best burr grinder" and....:icon_blush:

Ron_L
11-27-2011, 11:13 PM
So what is the best burr grinder that you like, Ron?

I hate when people answer questions with questions, but... :becky:

For what application? That's important.

For brewed coffee (drip, press, pour over, etc.) I think the Baratza Maestro Plus is an excellent grinder at an excellent price ($129 typical, less on sale). It is a conical burr grinder with a decent size motor and burrs and fine enough adjustability for any brewing method. It would be an excellent spice grinder, too, but probably overkill. The Baratza Maestro would be better choice for spices and is cheaper since with spices you dont need as many adjustment steps.

For espresso, now we're into another ball park :-D. The lowest priced grinder that I would consider for espresso is the Gaggia MDF at about $250. It has a decent adjustment range with fine enough steps to be able to dial in the right grind for espresso. If I were buying a new espresso grinder today I would get either a Mazzar Mini or a Macap M4. Both start out in the $550 range and go up to close to $1,000 depending on the control system. The Macap M4 Manual Stepless is a great grinder for the money.

If money were no object, I would buy a Macap M7A stepless automatic. The thing is a tank with a huge motor and 3" burrs. But, it's also $1200!

Honestly, if I were going to buy another espresso grinder (note I typed 'another', not 'new') I would do what I did before and find a cafe that is going out of business and buy their grinder for a fraction of the cost of a new one. I bought a commercial grinder that sold for over $2000 5 years ago and paid $150 for it and then added another $40 for a new set of burrs.

TMI? :-D

buccaneer
11-27-2011, 11:21 PM
I hate when people answer questions with questions, but... :becky:

For what application? That's important.

The Baratza Maestro would be better choice for spices and is cheaper since with spices you dont need as many adjustment steps.



TMI? :-D
Not TMI!
I thought about the Baratza Maestro but doubted it could do things like cinnamon sticks and star anise?
What do you think?