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View Full Version : Help Cleaning a Lang 60


Boshizzle
11-22-2011, 10:21 PM
Ok, I have a new to me Lang 60. I am a clean freak and don't buy into the whole "sludge, leftover grease, rancid meat means flavor" theory.

So, can I take the Lang to the local car wash, wash it out throughly, rinse it, and then build a hot fire in it to dry, rub it down with cooking oil and then continue to heat it up and let it season again?

Is there a way to remove the baffle/diffuser plates that make the reverse flow possible?

Thanks, brethren for any help.

BBQ Bandit
11-22-2011, 10:33 PM
Yes, and no.

The reverse flow plate baffle is welded in... not removable.

You could take it to a car wash... but that's when the cooker is without a fire.
Or... fire it up... and scrub down and steam clean when over 300*.

Either way... re-seasoning is required.

Big Bears BBQ
11-22-2011, 10:37 PM
I always used a power washer on mine or the car wash. I just used high pressure water no soap. I never took the baffle apart just whip the inside of the pipe with rags and never had a problem.

After washing I would spray it with Pam leave the doors open so it would dry good. Hope this helps...............

Boshizzle
11-22-2011, 10:38 PM
OK, Bob, thanks, I am just trying to figure out how to prevent it from rusting under the baffle.

Boshizzle
11-22-2011, 10:38 PM
I always used a power washer on mine or the car wash. I just used high pressure water no soap. I never took the baffle apart just whip the inside of the pipe with rags and never had a problem.

After washing I would spray it with Pam leave the doors open so it would dry good. Hope this helps...............

Yep, that helps. Thanks!

Big Bears BBQ
11-22-2011, 10:42 PM
Hey one other thing I always cleaned the fire box out before I washed it out.............

jonboy
11-22-2011, 10:47 PM
Fire it up. Let it get hot. Pressure wash it.Spray it down with some peanut oil and throw on a fatty or some chicken. Cook. Eat. Enjoy.
jon

Cloudsmoker
11-22-2011, 11:57 PM
Honest question: car wash?

I thought that was seriously frowned upon by car wash folksm-- messes up their drainage, or something like that.

HBMTN
11-23-2011, 12:10 AM
It's easy Joe, bring her to 300 degrees and raise the door hit the inside quick with a spray nozzle on a garden hose and shut the lid quick. Wait about 30 secodes and be careful not to get your arm in the steam, raise the door and spray the whole inside real good and shut the lid. I usually then wait about 5 minutes and repeat the process. I do this with the drain open.

Watch the end of this video of Ben Lang demonstrating firing up and cleaning a Lang Ben Lang demonstrates starting a fire in a Lang 36 - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GaWwcF5gIJ8&feature=results_video&playnext=1&list=PL997944DC01C3C18A)

G2
11-23-2011, 06:59 AM
My process...

1) After a cook when the smoker is still warm, scrape the grate surfaces with a wire brush.
2) Once the smoker is cool, I remove the grates and use a small flat shovel to scrape & shovel out the bottom of the smoker including the drain channel.
3) I use a metal brush and water hose to scrape both sides of the grates (outside of the smoker)
4) I place the grates back in the smoker then use my trusty weed burner to go over the entire inside taking care not to heat any one point so much to bust a weld.

I NEVER spray water inside the cooker unless it's to steam the grates just before meat goes on. Also, I never scrape the inside of the tank itself, just the grates and bottom pan.

The entire process takes about an hour by myself but considerably less time if you can find some sucker to clean the grates.

nmayeux
11-23-2011, 11:15 AM
Ok, I am a little different from the crowd, as I try to keep steel and water as separate as possible to keep rust at bay. I also have wondered about the stress on the steel caused by repeatedly hitting a hot surface with cold water, so here is what I do (sounds like a lot, but only takes about 15 minutes to do):

1. Keep the pit covered or in an enclosed space to keep moisture at bay.
2. Clean the pit after every use.
3. While hot, brush the grates (top and bottom) with a stainless welding brush, and set aside.
4. Scrape any loose creasote from door and top of smoke chamber.
5. Scrape the drip tray clean using a putty knife and welding brush. Spray any dry looking areas with cooking spray or a light coat of oil (including racks).
6. Because of the chemical reaction with ashes and water, make sure the firebox is emptied before storage. I use a flat shovel and a shop vac.
7. several times during a cook, I rub a coat of Crisco on the firebox to keep things nice and shiny (paint won't last).

Lastly, I have a tin foil fetish, so I put foil over the bottom lip to catch the condensation and drippings from running down the side of the smoker, and to also catch the creasote that drips from the exhaust. Because I won't be able to get another decent smoker until the kids are out of the house, taking care of this one is a priority!

nmayeux
11-23-2011, 11:19 AM
One more thing... I was having some trouble keeping my temps steady, and realized that a bunch of ash and other debris had collected under the pan between the firebox and the drain pipe. Using a brush to clean this out made all the difference in the world! It only took me 7 years to figure this out!

BBQ_MAFIA
11-23-2011, 01:51 PM
I do exactly what Noah does when cleaning my Langs and they stay looking good and are always clean. I just don't have a place to keep them indoors when they are not in use.



Ok, I am a little different from the crowd, as I try to keep steel and water as separate as possible to keep rust at bay. I also have wondered about the stress on the steel caused by repeatedly hitting a hot surface with cold water, so here is what I do (sounds like a lot, but only takes about 15 minutes to do):

1. Keep the pit covered or in an enclosed space to keep moisture at bay.
2. Clean the pit after every use.
3. While hot, brush the grates (top and bottom) with a stainless welding brush, and set aside.
4. Scrape any loose creasote from door and top of smoke chamber.
5. Scrape the drip tray clean using a putty knife and welding brush. Spray any dry looking areas with cooking spray or a light coat of oil (including racks).
6. Because of the chemical reaction with ashes and water, make sure the firebox is emptied before storage. I use a flat shovel and a shop vac.
7. several times during a cook, I rub a coat of Crisco on the firebox to keep things nice and shiny (paint won't last).

Lastly, I have a tin foil fetish, so I put foil over the bottom lip to catch the condensation and drippings from running down the side of the smoker, and to also catch the creasote that drips from the exhaust. Because I won't be able to get another decent smoker until the kids are out of the house, taking care of this one is a priority!

The Pigman
11-23-2011, 01:58 PM
Wow no caR WASH HERE PROB END UP WEARING IT ALL.
I wire brush the racks and then take them out
Then I scrape out what is in smoker
Then I place the racks back in get temp up to 450/500 and take garden hose and spray down racks and bottom so it all washes out drain tube
Then I take up to 450/500 again and steam/ wash again
Then I take back up to 450/500 again and dry out the inside of smoker when temp gets to about 250 I open up the smoker and spray down with pam

Works for me and no BIG mess

nmayeux
11-23-2011, 03:26 PM
I just don't have a place to keep them indoors when they are not in use.
That's because you have too many smokers dammit! I have a little extra room for one of your Spicewines...