PDA

View Full Version : To Much Rub?


ddog27
05-09-2005, 02:12 PM
I remember watching an episode of "Good Eats" on the food network and Alton Brown said the most important thing about the rub is that it has as much contact with the meat as possible. That made sense to me. But since then I have also heard some experienced BBQ people say the opposite and say to go easy on the rub. So I thought I would ask you guys! Which is it? Getting as much rub as possible in contact with the meat or just a little bit of rub? Please share your thoughts!

chad
05-09-2005, 02:19 PM
"As much contact" is not the same as amount used!

I think Alton meant make sure you coat the meat and allow it to work it's magic - being a 1/2 inch thick wouldn't give you any more contact with the meat! But it sure would be nasty when you took a bite.

Most rubs are very salty - the advise to "go easy" is a wise one.

tommykendall
05-09-2005, 04:59 PM
Most rubs are very salty - the advise to "go easy" is a wise one.


That was my first thought. Many of the products out there caal their stuff "seasoning" instead of rub. Those typically contain high salt content and generally call for putting on your meat within 15 minutes from smoking. Rubs on the other hand can generally go on hours in advance but it greatly depends on overall salt content.

frognot
05-09-2005, 05:57 PM
Most rubs are very salty - the advise to "go easy" is a wise one.


That was my first thought. Many of the products out there caal their stuff "seasoning" instead of rub. Those typically contain high salt content and generally call for putting on your meat within 15 minutes from smoking. Rubs on the other hand can generally go on hours in advance but it greatly depends on overall salt content.

TK, i reckon you know a li'l about various rubs. :D

You used all them up yet?

Bigmista
05-09-2005, 06:02 PM
About 1/8 of my personal rub is salt. A bit more is brown sugar. I make sure i get rub all over and into all of the crevasses. They don't call it rub for nothin!!

Hoorenga
05-09-2005, 09:38 PM
I have found that if I rubb my ribbs the same way that I rubb my butt (sorry couldn't help that, it just slipped out) that the ribbs come out too salty. My simple conclusion is that a ribb is a thin piece of meat and can be easily over powered. A larger chunk of meat rubbed in the same manner can more easily absorbe the extra salt and spices.

BrooklynQ
05-09-2005, 09:43 PM
There's some schools that say you should only sprinkle on a rub so as not to clog the pores of the meat. Others say to rub it in. Others pat your meat real gently. Try it different ways till you get the result you like.

BBQchef33
05-09-2005, 11:33 PM
My homemade rubs contain NO Salt. I add the salt seperatly from the shaker so i know how much im putting on. Salt and MSG just about dont exist in my stuff. You can salt on your own if its needed but i don tlike adding it up front, especailly to rubs that will be sitting. Salt draws the juices out of the meat, so i like to add it after cooking if i have to.

Amount varies also. Sometimes its put on heavy and goes straight to the cooker shortly after, but if its going to sit overnight, i go lighter than i usually would. i have seen ribs dredged in rubs like chicken cutlets in bread crumbs... just dont know how that can be good. ?... be like crunching on rub.

Wayne
05-10-2005, 12:15 AM
I usually use a commercial rub, and how much I use depends on the meat that I am cooking and the people that will eat that meat. If I am feeding all the kids then I tend to go lighter on the rub. If I am fixing BBQ for adults then I use a lot of rub. If my guests are vegans then I use an extra heavy coating of rub because the only one that I have to please is myself, and I like it spicy and hot.

dapittboss
05-10-2005, 12:44 AM
I almost always use a mustard slather before sprinkling on my "rubs". I don't rub them but it sticks to the mustard really well. As most have already said, how much depends on the cut of meat I think.

Neil
05-10-2005, 04:10 AM
I splash the meat with worsteschire sauce then sprinkle the various spices on the meat directly from the shakers and pepper grinder. Next I rub it all in making a paste that gets spread all over
as I massage the spices into the meat.

spicewine
05-10-2005, 09:26 AM
There are 2 seasonings that I like to have total control over, that is Salt and Pepper. My rub contains only small amounts of these as I prefer to Salt and Pepper the meat before adding my rub. Then I cover the meat with rub and work it over real good. Reason---I like more pepper on my Beef than I do on my Pork or Chicken ect.